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Opening for a Collections & Research Librarian for Agricultural & Environmental Sciences at NCSU

Topic:

NC State University Libraries is seeking a talented individual for the position of Collections & Research Librarian for Agricultural & Environmental Sciences

The ideal candidate for this position will be an individual who has the ability to engage deeply with agricultural and environmental sciences researchers and students at all levels. This position will be primarily responsible for leading collaborative collection management in agricultural and environmental sciences and, in collaboration with our team, providing expert services for faculty, staff, and students across the research life cycle including information discovery, data curation, visualization, research computing, and scholarly communication.    

For your reference, please find the full vacancy announcement and more information about the position and the NC State University Libraries at https://www.lib.ncsu.edu/jobs/ehra/crlaes.

Failure as the Treatment for Transforming Complexity to Complicatedness

Welcome to the fourth issue of volume 42 of the IASSIST Quarterly (IQ 42:4, 2018).

The IASSIST Quarterly presents in this issue three papers. When you know how, cycling is easy. However, data for cycling infrastructure appears to be a messiness of complications, stakeholders and data producers. The exemplary lesson is that whatever your research area there are often many views and types of data possible for your research. And the fuller view does not make your research easier, but it does make it better. The term geospatial data covers many different types of data, and as such presents problems for building access points or portals for these data. The second paper also brings experiences with complicated data, now with a focus on data management and curation. I would say that the third paper on software development in digital humanities is also about complicatedness, but this time the complicatedness was not overcome. Maybe here complexity is a better choice of word than complicatedness. In my book things are complex until we have solved how to deal with them; after that they are only complicated. The word failure is even among the keywords selected for this entry. Again: Read and learn. You might learn more from failure than from success. I find that Sir Winston Churchill is always at hand to keep up the good spirit: ‘Success consists of going from failure to failure without loss of enthusiasm’.

From Canada comes the paper ‘Cycling Infrastructure in the Ottawa-Gatineau Area: A Complex Assemblage of Data’ that some readers might have seen in the form of a poster at the IASSIST 2018 conference in Montreal. The authors are Sylvie Lafortune, Social Sciences Librarian at Carleton University in Ottawa, and Joël Rivard, Geography and GIS Librarian at the University of Ottawa. The article is a commendable example of how to encompass and illuminate an area of research not only though data but also by including the data producers and stakeholders, and the relationships between them. The article is based upon a study conducted in 2017-2018 that explored the data story behind the cycling infrastructure in Ottawa, Canada’s capital city; or to be precise, the infrastructure of the cycling network of over 1,000 km which spans both sides of the Ontario and Quebec provincial boundary known as the Ottawa-Gatineau National Capital Region. The municipalities invest in cycling infrastructure including expanded and improved bike lanes and paths, traffic calming measures, parking facilities, bike-transit integration, bike sharing and training programs to promote cycling and increased cycling safety. The research included many types of data among which were data from telephone interviews concerning ‘who, where, why, when, and how’ in an Origin-Destination survey, data generated by mobile apps tracking fitness activities, collision data, and bike counters placed in the area. The study shows how a narrow subject topic such as cycling infrastructure is embedded in complicated data and many relationships.

Ningning Nicole Kong is the author of ‘One Store has All? –  the Backend Story of Managing Geospatial Information Toward an Easy Discovery’. Many libraries are handling geographical information and my shortened version of the abstract from the article promises: GeoBlacklight and OpenGeoportal are two open-source projects that initiated from academic institutions, which have been adopted by many universities and libraries for geospatial data discovery. The paper provides a summary of geospatial data management strategies by reviewing related projects, and focuses on best management practices when curating geospatial data. The paper starts with a historical introduction to geospatial datasets in academic libraries in the United States and also presents the complicatedness involved in geospatial data. The paper mentions geoportals and related projects in both the United States and Europe with a focus on OpenGeoportal. Nicole Kong is an assistant professor and GIS specialist at Purdue University Libraries.  

Sophie 1.0 was an attempt to create a multimedia editing, reading, and publishing platform. Based at the University of Southern California with national and international collaboration, Sophie 2.0 was a project to rewrite Sophie 1.0 in the Java programming language. The author Jasmine S. Kirby gives the rationale for the article ‘How NOT to Create a Digital Media Scholarship Platform: The History of the Sophie 2.0 Project’ in the sentence: ‘Understanding what went wrong with Sophie 2.0 can help us understand how to create better digital media scholarship tools’. For the first time we now have  failure among the keywords used for a paper in IQ. The Institute of the Future of the Book (IFB) was a central collaborator in the development of the Sophie versions. The IFB describes itself as a think-and-do tank and it is doing many projects. The Kirby paper gives us a brief insight into the future of reading, starting from basic e-books in the 1960s. When you read through the article you will note caveats like lack of focus on usability and changing of the underneath software language. The article ends with good questions for evaluating digital scholarship tools.

Submissions of papers for the IASSIST Quarterly are always very welcome. We welcome input from IASSIST conferences or other conferences and workshops, from local presentations or papers especially written for the IQ. When you are preparing such a presentation, give a thought to turning your one-time presentation into a lasting contribution. Doing that after the event also gives you the opportunity of improving your work after feedback. We encourage you to login or create an author login to https://www.iassistquarterly.com (our Open Journal System application). We permit authors 'deep links' into the IQ as well as deposition of the paper in your local repository. Chairing a conference session with the purpose of aggregating and integrating papers for a special issue IQ is also much appreciated as the information reaches many more people than the limited number of session participants and will be readily available on the IASSIST Quarterly website at https://www.iassistquarterly.com.  Authors are very welcome to take a look at the instructions and layout:

https://www.iassistquarterly.com/index.php/iassist/about/submissions

Authors can also contact me directly via e-mail: kbr@sam.sdu.dk. Should you be interested in compiling a special issue for the IQ as guest editor(s) I will also be delighted to hear from you.

Karsten Boye Rasmussen - February 2019

DPC2018 Conference Report

By Adetoun Oyelude, University of Ibadan

From Saturday 1st September 2018 when one of the participants from Uganda arrived in Nigeria, the Digital Preservation Conference started on a high note. The preparations for the Monday Opening Ceremony took place on Sunday 2nd with the Ugandan participant joining at the venue in preparing the Hall and other ancillaries concerning the conference. 

Day 1: The Opening Ceremony conference commenced at 11.45am on Monday, 3rd September 2018. In attendance were dignitaries from public and private sectors. The Chairman of the occasion was Barrister D. D. Fer who is the Acting Director of National Archives of Nigeria. Dr Abiola Abioye, the Chairman of the NLA-PACS delivered a welcome address. The Keynote addresswas given by Prof. G. Olubunmi Alegbeleye of  Babcock University, Ilisan Remo who is the Founding Chairman of the Section. Prof Alegbeleye dwelt on the imperatives of digital preservation having regards to the unique nature of digital information resources. James Lowry, a digital preservation expert at Liverpool University Centre for Archive Studies, University of Liverpool, United Kingdom contributed a keynote remotely. His keynote focused on digital preservation in a recessed economy with stringent budgets.

Goodwill messages were received from the National Librarian/CEO, National Library of Nigeria, Director-General of National Information Technology Development Agency (NITDA) and former President of Nigerian Library Association, Alhaji Rilwanu Abdulsalam. The representatives of the Head of Department of Library, Archival and Information Studies, University of Ibadan and the Director of African Regional Centre for Information Studies also presented goodwill messages on their behalf. The Comptroller-General of the Nigerian Immigration Service was also represented at the opening ceremony. The Director of the FCT Archives and History Bureau, Ms. Cyril Jogai and the Librarian of the Nigerian National Petroleum Company (NNPC) were also in attendance. The high point of the opening ceremony was the unveiling of the Section's website which participants at the opening ceremony instantly logged on to using the link https://nlapac.ng to gain access. The role of the International Association for Social Science Information Science and Technology (IASSIST) in sponsoring the conference, was acknowledged and emphasized and IASSIST's relevance in digital preservation was highlighted. Group photographs were taken and refreshments served.

Immediately after the opening ceremony, 3 paper presentations by Prof. G.O. Alegbeleye, Dr. Akinniyi Adeleke and Dr. Ngozi Azubogu were taken. The first speaker presented An Overview of Digital Preservation strategies while the other speakers presented two case studies of Digital Preservation from Tekena Tamuno University Libray, Adeleke University, Ede, and the Federal University of Technology, Owerri Library respectively. The session was chaired by Prof Yacob Haliso of Babcock University, Ilisan-Remo, Ogun State, Nigeria.

Day 2: Three Posters were presented by Grace Ikenna; Dr D'Anna Shotts and Anthonia Ahima; and Adetoun Oyelude on different aspects of digital preservation. The first was on the state of digital preservation in the Kenneth Dike Library, University of Ibadan, Nigeria; the second on the progress of digitization in the Northeastern Baptist collection in Nigeria while the third was on the impact of IASSIST on digital preservation in the African Region. Datasheets on IASSIST were distributed to participants at the conference. They were encouraged to visit the IASSIST website and join the network as Africa was poorly represented in IASSIST. 

Apart from posters, six papers were presentated in very stimulating sessions by Dr. Ezra Gbaje & Prof. Umar Ibrahim; Omobolade Adeagbo/Sunday Obadare/Femi Oguntuase & Samson Akande; Kathryn Phillips & Edidiong Eyo in the morning session. The afternoon session had Prince Jacob Igwe & Chidinma; Ifeyinwa Okafor & Olalekan Awujoola and Aishat Egbunu/ Adeyinka Koiki-Owoyele & Adefunke Alabi presenting on preserving cultural heritage through digital preservation. After each session activities, lots of networking, exchange of ideas, international perspectives... name it!

Day 3- even more exciting! Four papers by Dr. Benedict Oladele; Titilayo Ilesanmi; Christopher Okiki & Racheal Odunlade; and Adetoun Oyelude & Winny Akullo were delivered in the morning session which sparked stimulating discussions.

One needed to be there to listen to the afternoon session by Abass Mustapha on Audio-Visual Digital Preservation of Yoruba Indigenous Knowledge and its economic benefits, as well as the Busicon Exhibitor's presentation on equipment for Digital Preservation and methods for it, presented by Lola Akanbi, the CEO of the company. Quite a package! Participants were practically 'chased out' from the venue at 5.45pm, almost two hours beyond target, not due to lateness, but to the lively discussions that kept coming. See!

And... without doubt, NLA-PACS is creating a networking family that say nothing to each other, but come out with a colour code, simply coincidental! *Code purple!*. It was fun!

Day 4: The Grand finale was grand! The three papers that ended the conference were information packed, by Isaac Ajibola; Rachael Odunlade & Chris Okiki; plus a final one from Okwor, Ihekwoaba et al. The wrap-up, putting the communique together was another interesting exercise. The communiquehas been issued! It can be found on the NLA-PACS website. In closing the conference, the NLA-PACS Chairman, Dr. Abiola Abioye expressed appreciation to all those who contributed in various respects to make the conference a reality. On the whole, the Digital Preservation Conference 2018 was a huge success. Lessons were however, learnt which will properly position NLA-PACS for the next conference at which participants are expecting hands-on workshops. 

Not less than 15 participants from Africa promised to join the IASSIST network, and 3 who were members but in default, promising to renew their membership and also contribute to the next IASSIST conference in Sydney, Australia. The support from IASSIST ensured that the NLA-PACS website is up and running; making the Section the 3rd Section of the Nigerian Library Association to have a website (in spite of being almost the newest Section); and also producing "a most exciting conference which even though the first of its kind, is already giving the NLA Cataloguing Classification and Indexing Section (the best Section for the year 2017) a hot competition as the best," as described by a participant. The conference evaluation forms gave lots more comments, even on the innovative conference bags favoured by many participants!  The Section is already looking forward to NLA-PACS 2019, the best yet to come!

IASSIST Quarterly Volume 42:3 now available!

Editor's notes:  Digital curation after digital extraction for data sharing

Welcome to the third issue of volume 42 of the IASSIST Quarterly (IQ 42:3, 2018).

The IASSIST Quarterly presents in this issue three papers from geographically widespread countries. We call IASSIST ‘International’, so I am happy to present papers from three continents in this issue with papers from Zimbabwe, Italy and Canada.

The paper 'The State of Preparedness for Digital Curation and Preservation: A Case Study of a Developing Country Academic Library' is by Phillip Ndhlovu, who works as the institutional repository librarian and liaison librarian, and Thomas Matingwina, who is a lecturer at the Department of Library and Information Service at the National University of Science and Technology (NUST) in Bulawayo, Zimbabwe. Modern day libraries have vast amounts of digital content and the authors noted that because these collections require very different management than the traditional paper-based materials, the new materials’ longevity is endangered. Their study assessed the state of preparedness of the NUST Library for digital curation and preservation, including the assessment of awareness, competencies, technology infrastructure, digital disaster preparedness, and challenges to digital curation and preservation. They found a lack of policies, lack of expertise by library staff, and lack of funding.

You might conclude that investigating your own organization and reaching the very well known conclusion that 'we need more money!' is not so surprising. However, you have to take note that the Jeff Rothenberg statement from 1995 that 'Digital information lasts forever – or five years, whichever comes first' has not yet sunk in with politicians and administrators, who will immediately associate the term 'digital' with 'saving money'. This study shows them why this is not a valid connotation. It is a study of a single institution, and as the authors note it cannot be generalized even to other academic libraries in Zimbabwe. However, other libraries - also outside Zimbabwe - have here a good guide for making their own assessment of the digital preparedness of their institution. 

The second paper was - as was the paper above - presented at the IASSIST conference in 2018 and is also about the transition from media known for thousands of years to new media and digital forms. Peter Peller presented the paper 'From Paper Map to Geospatial Vector Layer: Demystifying the Process'. He is the Director of the Spatial and Numeric Data Services unit at Libraries and Cultural Resources at the University of Calgary in Canada. 

The conversion of raster images of maps to vector data is analogous to OCR technologies extracting words from scanned print documents. Thereby the map information becomes more accessible, and usable in geographic information systems (GIS). An illustrative example is that historical geospatial information can be overlaid in Google Earth. The description of the entire process incorporates examples of the various techniques, including different types of editing. Furthermore, descriptions of the software used in selected studies are listed in the appendix. It is mentioned that 'paper texture and ink spread' can be responsible for introducing noise and errors, so remember to keep the old maps. This is because what is considered noise in one context might become the subject for interesting future research. In addition the software for extracting information will most certainly improve.

For once both the author and we at IASSIST Quarterly have been quite fast. The data for the third paper was collected in late 2017 and the results are presented here only a year later. In October 2017 a message appeared on the IASSIST mail list with the start of the sentence 'I would share the data but...' It quickly generated many ways of completing that sentence. Flavio Bonifacio - who works at Metis Ricerche srl in Torino, Italy - quickly launched a questionnaire sent to members of the mail list and to others from similar communities of interested individuals. The questionnaire was an extension of an earlier one concerning scientists' reuse and sharing of data. The paper includes many tabulations and models showing the background as well as the data sharing attitudes found in the survey. A respondent typology is developed based upon the level of propensity for sharing data and the level of experiencing problems in data sharing into a 2-by-2 table consisting of 'irreducible reluctant', 'reducible reluctant', 'problematic follower', and 'premium follower'.    

In the Nordic countries we tend to have the impression that certain services are publicly available and for free. This impression is plainly superficial because we Nordic people also know very well that 'there is no such thing as a free lunch'! All services must be paid for in one way or another. If you have many services that carry no direct cost, it is probably because you - and others - paid for them beforehand through taxation. Because of cuts in the public economy one of the things Flavio Bonifacio wanted to investigate was the question 'Is there a market for selling data-sharing services?' The results imply that 'reducible reluctants' can be a target for services that reduce the problems of that group.

Submissions of papers for the IASSIST Quarterly are always very welcome. We welcome input from IASSIST conferences or other conferences and workshops, from local presentations or papers especially written for the IQ. When you are preparing such a presentation, give a thought to turning your one-time presentation into a lasting contribution. Doing that after the event also gives you the opportunity of improving your work after feedback. We encourage you to login or create an author login to https://www.iassistquarterly.com (our Open Journal System application). We permit authors 'deep links' into the IQ as well as deposition of the paper in your local repository. Chairing a conference session with the purpose of aggregating and integrating papers for a special issue IQ is also much appreciated as the information reaches many more people than the limited number of session participants and will be readily available on the IASSIST Quarterly website at https://www.iassistquarterly.com.  Authors are very welcome to take a look at the instructions and layout:

https://www.iassistquarterly.com/index.php/iassist/about/submissions

Authors can also contact me directly via e-mail: kbr@sam.sdu.dk. Should you be interested in compiling a special issue for the IQ as guest editor(s) I will also be delighted to hear from you.

Karsten Boye Rasmussen - November 2018

Data Workshop Conducted at the National Library of Uganda

By Winny Nekesa Akullo, Uganda Library and Information Associations 

I won sponsorship from the International Association for Social Science Information Services and Technology (IASSIST) for a One-day Data workshop conducted on 29th November 2018 at the National Library of Uganda on behalf of the Uganda Library and Information Associations (ULIA). The workshop aimed at bringing together librarians from different institutions in Uganda to learn how to collect relevant and meaningful data to tell stories relating to the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The workshop attracted 20 librarians from government departments, academia, public and community libraries.

The workshop was facilitated by Dr. Sarah Kaddu, the President, ULIA and Mr. Eric Haumba, Chief Librarian, YMCA Comprehensive Institute and moderated by Ms. Winny Nekesa Akullo, the Publicity Secretary of ULIA, IASSIST Event Liaison Officer and a member of IASSIST.

The workshop topics included; The UN 2030 Agenda and AU Agenda 2063; the role of libraries in the 2030 Agenda and” Telling Your Story” Tracking and Collection of Relevant Data Template for Documenting Stories. At the end of the workshop participants were presented with certificates of participations.

In his opening remarks, the Director of the National Library of Uganda, Mr. Adonia Katungisa, noted that the workshop was timely and more relevant to the librarians considering that the policy makers and researchers are now demanding for data and statistics to enable them make informed decisions and planning for the libraries in the country. Its therefore, time for people to know what libraries are doing.

Dr. Kaddu on the other hand emphasized that as librarians, “we need to work closely within the profession and other sectors to achieve UN 2030 Agenda”, she implored the participants to use statistics to advocate for positive change in their societies. Using relevant data is a very good way to support our advocacy and tell our stories. There is need to define the purpose for the data, what data do you need, where to find the data, explain the data and connect the numbers to the story you are trying to tell. 

Therefore, there is need to strengthen data collection, management and dissemination to capture evidence to inform decision making.

Feedback from the participants indicated the objective of the workshop was fully achieved and the quality of the results at the workshop was high quality. The participants also recommended for establishment of a database/system to collect library statistics and activities countrywide and training in data literacy skills to ensure that data are used and interpreted correctly.

The Participants were very enthusiastic to be part of the workshop and also looked forward to joining IASSIST as members.

We are very grateful to IASSIST for its support without which this workshop wouldn’t have been possible.

Data Workshop Conducted at the National Library of Uganda

By Winny Nekesa Akullo, Uganda Library and Information Associations 

I won sponsorship from the International Association for Social Science Information Services and Technology (IASSIST) for a One-day Data workshop conducted on 29th November 2018 at the National Library of Uganda on behalf of the Uganda Library and Information Associations (ULIA). The workshop aimed at bringing together librarians from different institutions in Uganda to learn how to collect relevant and meaningful data to tell stories relating to the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The workshop attracted 20 librarians from government departments, academia, public and community libraries.

 

The workshop was facilitated by Dr. Sarah Kaddu, the President, ULIA and Mr. Eric Haumba, Chief Librarian, YMCA Comprehensive Institute and moderated by Ms. Winny Nekesa Akullo, the Publicity Secretary of ULIA, IASSIST Event Liaison Officer and a member of IASSIST.

The workshop topics included; The UN 2030 Agenda and AU Agenda 2063; the role of libraries in the 2030 Agenda and” Telling Your Story” Tracking and Collection of Relevant Data Template for Documenting Stories. At the end of the workshop participants were presented with certificates of participations.

In his opening remarks, the Director of the National Library of Uganda, Mr. Adonia Katungisa, noted that the workshop was timely and more relevant to the librarians considering that the policy makers and researchers are now demanding for data and statistics to enable them make informed decisions and planning for the libraries in the country. Its therefore, time for people to know what libraries are doing.

Dr. Kaddu on the other hand emphasized that as librarians, “we need to work closely within the profession and other sectors to achieve UN 2030 Agenda”, she implored the participants to use statistics to advocate for positive change in their societies. Using relevant data is a very good way to support our advocacy and tell our stories. There is need to define the purpose for the data, what data do you need, where to find the data, explain the data and connect the numbers to the story you are trying to tell. 

Therefore, there is need to strengthen data collection, management and dissemination to capture evidence to inform decision making.

Feedback from the participants indicated the objective of the workshop was fully achieved and the quality of the results at the workshop was high quality. The participants also recommended for establishment of a database/system to collect library statistics and activities countrywide and training in data literacy skills to ensure that data are used and interpreted correctly.

The Participants were very enthusiastic to be part of the workshop and also looked forward to joining IASSIST as members.

We are very grateful to IASSIST for its support without which this workshop wouldn’t have been possible.

IASSIST Quarterly Volume 42:2 now available!

Editor's notes:  Metadata is key - the most important data after data

Welcome to the second issue of volume 42 of the IASSIST Quarterly (IQ 42:2, 2018).

The IASSIST Quarterly has had several papers on many different aspects of the Data Documentation Initiative - for a long time better known by its acronym DDI, without any further explanation. DDI is a brand. The IASSIST Quarterly has also included special issues of collections of papers concerning DDI.

Among staff at data archives and data libraries, as well as the users of these facilities, I think we can agree that it is the data that comes first. However, fundamental to all uses of data is the documentation describing the data, without which the data are useless. Therefore, it comes as no surprise that the IASSIST Quarterly is devoted partly to the presentation of papers related to documentation. The question of documentation or data resembles the question of the chicken or the egg. Don't mistake the keys for your car. The metadata and the data belong together and should not be separated.

DDI now is a standard, but as with other standards it continues to evolve. The argument about why standards are good comes to mind: 'The nice thing about standards is that you have so many to choose from!'. DDI is the de facto standard for most social science data at data archives and university data libraries.

The first paper demonstrates a way to tackle the heterogeneous character of the usage of the DDI. The approach is able to support collaborative questionnaire development as well as export in several formats including the metadata as DDI. The second paper shows how an institutionalized and more general metadata standard - in this case the Belgian Encoded Archival Description (EAD) - is supported by a developed crosswalk from DDI to EAD. However, IQ 42:2 is not a DDI special issue, and the third paper presents an open-source research data management platform called Dendro and a laboratory notebook called LabTablet without mentioning DDI. However, the paper certainly does mention metadata - it is the key to all data.

The winner of the paper competition of the IASSIST 2017 conference is presented in this issue. 'Flexible DDI Storage' is authored by Oliver Hopt, Claus-Peter Klas, Alexander Mühlbauer, all affiliated with GESIS - the Leibniz-Institute for the Social Sciences in Germany. The authors argue that the current usage of DDI is heterogeneous and that this results in complex database models for each developed application. The paper shows a new binding of DDI to applications that works independently of most version changes and interpretative differences, thus avoiding continuous reimplementation. The work is based upon their developed DDI-FlatDB approach, which they showed at the European DDI conferences in 2015 and 2016, and which is also described in the paper. Furthermore, a web-based questionnaire editor and application supports large DDI structures and collaborative questionnaire development as well as production of structured metadata for survey institutes and data archives. The paper describes the questionnaire workflow from the start to the export of questionnaire, DDI XML, and SPSS. The development is continuing and it will be published as open source. 

The second paper is also focused on DDI, now in relation to a new data archive. 'Elaborating a Crosswalk Between Data Documentation Initiative (DDI) and Encoded Archival Description (EAD) for an Emerging Data Archive Service Provider' is by Benjamin Peuch who is a researcher at the State Archives of Belgium. It is expected that the future Belgian data archive will be part of the State Archives, and because DDI is the most widespread metadata standard in the social sciences, the State Archives have developed a DDI-to-EAD crosswalk in order to re-use their EAD infrastructure. The paper shows the conceptual differences between DDI and EAD - both XML based - and how these can be reconciled or avoided for the purpose of a data archive for the social sciences. The author also foresees a fruitful collaboration between traditional archivists and social scientists.

The third paper is by a group of scholars connected to the Informatics Engineering Department of University of Porto and the INESC TEC in Portugal. Cristina Ribeiro, João Rocha da Silva, João Aguiar Castro, Ricardo Carvalho Amorim, João Correia Lopes, and Gabriel David are the authors of 'Research Data Management Tools and Workflows: Experimental Work at the University of Porto'. The authors start with the statement that 'Research datasets include all kinds of objects, from web pages to sensor data, and originate in every domain'. The task is to make these data visible, described, preserved, and searchable. The focus is on data preparation, dataset organization and metadata creation. Some groups were proposed a developed open-source research data management platform called Dendro and a laboratory notebook called LabTablet, while other groups that demanded a domain-specific approach had special developed models and applications. All development and metadata modelling have in sight the metadata dissemination.

Submissions of papers for the IASSIST Quarterly are always very welcome. We welcome input from IASSIST conferences or other conferences and workshops, from local presentations or papers especially written for the IQ. When you are preparing such a presentation, give a thought to turning your one-time presentation into a lasting contribution. Doing that after the event also gives you the opportunity of improving your work after feedback. We encourage you to login or create an author login to https://www.iassistquarterly.com (our Open Journal System application). We permit authors 'deep links' into the IQ as well as deposition of the paper in your local repository. Chairing a conference session with the purpose of aggregating and integrating papers for a special issue IQ is also much appreciated as the information reaches many more people than the limited number of session participants and will be readily available on the IASSIST Quarterly website at https://www.iassistquarterly.com.  Authors are very welcome to take a look at the instructions and layout:

https://www.iassistquarterly.com/index.php/iassist/about/submissions

Authors can also contact me directly via e-mail: kbr@sam.sdu.dk. Should you be interested in compiling a special issue for the IQ as guest editor(s) I will also be delighted to hear from you.

Karsten Boye Rasmussen - June, 2018

Qualitative Social Science and Humanities Data Interest Group (QSSHDIG)

The Qualitative Social Science and Humanities Data Interest Group (QSSHDIG) had another great year. We would love to have you join us if you are interested in our group. Just ask Mandy or Lynda.

  • At IASSIST 2017 we had social gathering and a BoF meeting to brainstorm activities for upcoming year. You can read our notes from the discussion on our website.
  • A subgroup posted a four-part blog series in late July/early August of 2017. Big thanks to Mandy, Liz Cooper, and Jill Conte for organizing and writing.
  • Gathered group feedback for a book proposal outline on Qualitative Research Data Librarianship book proposal. Planning to do special issue of IQ with Celia Emmelhainz and Lynda Kellam as guest editors. Email Lynda if you are interested in working with us.
  • Created IASSIST QSSHDIG google site – includes an “expert list” that we compiled and circulated to the IASSIST listserv.
  • Coordinated with Amy Pienta and Qualitative Data Repository (QDR) folks to arrange IASSIST PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT WEBINAR SERIES: Teaching Qualitative Data Management: Lessons from QDR.
  • Subgroup is reviewing the list of libraries that are Association of Research Libraries for qualitative data support and training/edu materials. Out of 126 libraries we were able to review 116. Data are compiled, but not ready to report out findings yet. We plan to use it for compiling a teaching materials page on our site and for possible article in the special issue. Thanks to Sara Demott, Liz Cooper, Alesia Montgomery, Jonathan Cain, and Mandy for doing the reviews and special thanks to Sara for setting up the Qualtrics survey.

IASSIST Quarterly Volume 42:1 available

Editor's notes:  Rebuilding, Preserving and Reproducing

Welcome to the first issue of Volume 42 of the IASSIST Quarterly (IQ 42:1, 2018).

The IASSIST Quarterly has a focus on curation, preservation and reproduction of research, and all three bases are covered in this issue. The reproduction of earlier results from archived data is a validation of the data and also of the earlier research. The mimicking reuse of data for reproduction of the original results is the normal first step before use of the data for new purposes. This IQ starts with a paper on reproduction. Before reproduction is possible, intensive work is required at the earliest stage to curate the data, and in the case of older data - as presented in this issue - a costly process of rebuilding the data from old formats and forms of storage. Between the establishment of the data as a resource and the subsequent reproduction, the preservation process secures the data for future use. The middle paper brings special attention to preservation of 3D digital data.

At the IASSIST 2017 conference the presentation 'Reproducing and Preserving Research with ReproZip' was given at the session 'E3: Tools for Reproducible Workflows Across the Research Lifecycle'. This is presented here as a paper with the title 'Using ReproZip for Reproducibility and Library Services' by Vicky Steeves, Rémi Rampin, and Fernando Chirigati. The authors work at New York University as Librarian for Research Data Management and Reproducibility, Research Engineer, and PhD candidate. They present ReproZip, an open source tool designed to help overcome the technical difficulties involved in preserving and replicating research, ranging from digital humanities to machine learning as well as library services. The paper addresses the concept of computational reproducibility leading to capture and preservation of digital environments, and the creation of a file that encapsulates metadata about the computational environment - including the operating system, hardware architecture, and software library dependencies - in order to achieve reproducibility. The authors state that ReproZip can be used to reproduce and preserve research holistically.

At the same conference in the session 'E1: Preservation Matters' Jennifer Moore of Washington University Libraries in St. Louis and Hannah Scates Kettler of University of Iowa Libraries presented their paper 'Who cares about 3D data preservation?'. Well, the IQ does! 3D digital data preservation is necessary when for example an anthropologist produces digital 3D data as a preservation and presentation mechanism for an artefact. The 3D digital data has - like other data - to be treated for preservation. The artefact could be a building, and the paper holds much technical information and literature that refers to various interesting 3D projects; for example the Augmented Asbury Park app that projects lost - and now virtual - buildings and attractions upon their earlier physical space using augmented reality.

The last paper in this issue is 'Retirement in the 1950s: Rebuilding a Longitudinal Research Database' by Amy M. Pienta and Jared Lyle, respectively Associate Research Scientist and Director of Curation at ICPSR at the University of Michigan. This tells the story of the successful recovery of the important data from Gordon Streib’s Cornell Study of Occupational Retirement (CSOR). The paper includes the caveat that the work involved in rescuing these old data was many times more expensive than curating newer data would be. The CSOR followed a large (over 4,000 person) national cohort of retirement-age men and women in the period 1952 to 1958. The study is of great value for research in such areas as the relationships between health and gender and retirement. The data was deemed unrecoverable, as the punched cards did not directly match the documentation. Further work and additional materials were required to make it possible. The data is enriched by collections of several types of health records and examinations; some remaining in paper form that can be consulted for closer investigation on-site at ICPSR.                                            

Submissions of papers for the IASSIST Quarterly are always very welcome. We encourage you to login or create an author login to https://www.iassistquarterly.com .  We welcome input from IASSIST conferences or other conferences and workshops, from local presentations or papers especially written for the IQ. When you are preparing a presentation, give a thought to turning your one-time presentation into a lasting contribution. We permit authors 'deep links' into the IQ as well as deposition of the paper in your local repository. Chairing a conference session with the purpose of aggregating and integrating papers for a special issue IQ is also much appreciated as the information reaches many more people than the session participants, and will be readily available on the IASSIST Quarterly website at http://www.iassistquarterly.com. 

Authors are very welcome to take a look at the instructions and layout:

https://www.iassistquarterly.com/index.php/iassist/about/submissions

Authors can also contact me directly via e-mail: kbr@sam.sdu.dk. Should you be interested in compiling a special issue for the IQ as guest editor(s) I will also be delighted to hear from you.

Karsten Boye Rasmussen - April, 2018

New to IASSIST or Willing to Mentor Someone New?

 New to IASSIST or Willing to Mentor Someone New?

 

Please sign up by Thursday, May 17. Conference contact assignments for IASSIST will be emailed by the end of the day Monday, May 21.

 

 

Please fill out in Google forms:
https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScyW2B9m8o5-6Z0D0FPdsTcqkOpUDk_w_u4WwuyIpDWgjAQJQ/viewform Looking forward to the best IASSIST ever!   Bobray Bordelon bordelon@Princeton.edu IASSIST 2018 Mentor Coordinator
  • IASSIST Quarterly

    Publications Special issue: A pioneer data librarian
    Welcome to the special volume of the IASSIST Quarterly (IQ (37):1-4, 2013). This special issue started as exchange of ideas between Libbie Stephenson and Margaret Adams to collect

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    Resources

    A space for IASSIST members to share professional resources useful to them in their daily work. Also the IASSIST Jobs Repository for an archive of data-related position descriptions. more...

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