IQ

Editor's Notes: Data management for students, researchers, and data science projects

By IQ Editor

September 28, 2021

Welcome to the second issue of IASSIST Quarterly 2021 (IQ vol. 45(2) 2021) . Data management is the focal point of the articles in this issue of the IQ. Aspects of data management have often been the central topic of many earlier IQ articles. Metaphorically simply said: Data is what IASSIST members breathe - data management is how we breathe it. The first two articles concern raising the attention and knowledge of data management among students and researchers.

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Final Call for Papers: Systemic Racism in Data Practices IASSIST Quarterly

By IQ Editor

June 14, 2021

Final Call: Systemic Racism in Data Practices Inspired by the work of Black scholars, technologists, and activists including Dr. Safiya Noble, Yeshimabeit Milner, and Joy Buolamwini, IASSIST Quarterly is publishing a special issue focusing on systemic racist practices in data. We invite you to submit a proposal that discusses anti-Blackness, anti-indigeneity, white supremacy, and racism against minoritized and marginalized communities in data, research, tools, and practices. Case studies, essays, book reviews, and articles will be considered.

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Editor's notes: Joining language with data and data with data

By Karsten Boye Rasmussen

March 29, 2021

Welcome to the IASSIST Quarterly first issue of 2021 and of volume 45 (IQ 45(1) 2021). I always find it interesting to learn more about other research areas. Often, I find approaches in less well-known areas can be transformed and transferred to my own areas, or make me aware of problems unwisely ignored hitherto and becoming potentials. In the case of the first article, you will become aware of the connection with linguistics from a data viewpoint.

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Editor's notes: Sharing open data without risk, and with machine-actionable provenance metadata

By Karsten Boye Rasmussen

December 18, 2020

Welcome to the fourth issue of 2020 and the last issue of volume 44 of the IASSIST Quarterly (IQ 44(4) 2020). At a future time, there might be a special issue of IASSIST Quarterly on ‘Corona data’. Right now, the numbers are rising as we are entering winter, but on the other hand vaccination is around the corner. I hope that only 2020 will be remembered as the year of the Coronavirus, and that 2021 will bring us better times.

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CFP for Special Issue: Systemic Racism in Data Practices

By IQ Editor

December 14, 2020

Systemic Racism in Data Practices Inspired by the work of Black scholars, technologists, and activists including Dr. Safiya Noble, Yeshimabeit Milner, and Joy Buolamwini, IASSIST Quarterly is publishing a special issue focusing on systemic racist practices in data. We invite you to submit a proposal that discusses anti-Blackness, antiindigeneity, white supremacy, and racism against minoritized and marginalized communities in data, research, tools, and practices. Case studies, essays, and articles will be considered.

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Welcome to the third issue of volume 44 of the IASSIST Quarterly

By Karsten Boye Rasmussen

September 23, 2020

Welcome to the third issue of volume 44 of the IASSIST Quarterly (IQ 44(3) 2020). Transparency is a prerequisite for valid analysis of data. Full disclosure of all aspects of the creation process is necessary for the evaluation of a data collection. The Roper Center has collaborated, assembled and developed standards, and performed scoring of datasets to facilitate the evaluation of data. It is easy to say that all aspects of data collection are important, but with more knowledge about the process of data curation PhD students become aware of how it is important for their research.

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Countries closing down - Reproducibility keeping science open

By Karsten Boye Rasmussen

July 2, 2020

Welcome to volume 44 of the IASSIST Quarterly. Here in 2020 we start with a double issue on reproducibility (IQ 44(1-2)). The start of 2020 was in the sign of Corona. Though we are now only in the middle of the year, we can say with confidence that 2020 will be known for the closing down of nearly all public life. From our very own world this included the move of the IASSIST 2020 conference to 2021.

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IQ 43(4) available!

By mhayslett

January 8, 2020

Welcome to the fourth issue of volume 43 of the IASSIST Quarterly (IQ 43:4, 2019). The first article is authored by Jessica Mozersky, Heidi Walsh, Meredith Parsons, Tristan McIntosh, Kari Baldwin, and James M. DuBois – all located at the Bioethics Research Center, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri in USA. They ask the question “Are we ready to share qualitative research data?”, with the subtitle “Knowledge and preparedness among qualitative researchers, IRB Members, and data repository curators.

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IQ 43(3) Available: As open as possible and as closed as needed

By mhayslett

September 27, 2019

Welcome to the third issue of volume 43 of the IASSIST Quarterly (IQ 43:3, 2019). Yes, we are open! Open data is good. Just a click away. Downloadable 24/7 for everybody. An open government would make the decisionmakers' data open to the public and the opposition. As an example, communal data on bicycle paths could be open, so more navigation apps would flourish and embed the information in maps, which could suggest more safe bicycle routes.

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Editor's notes: The interest group on qualitative data sums up and continues

By mhayslett

June 28, 2019

Welcome to the second issue of volume 43 of the IASSIST Quarterly (IQ 43:2, 2019). With joy and pride the many people behind each issue of the IQ are here presenting a special issue. IASSIST has several interest groups of members committed to selected important areas under the umbrella of IASSIST. Be aware that you could become a member of an interest group (see: Committees and groups). If an interest area that you find important is not presently on this list, you are invited to start campaigning for the formation of a new interest group.

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