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December 2018

DPC2018 Conference Report

By Adetoun Oyelude, University of Ibadan

From Saturday 1st September 2018 when one of the participants from Uganda arrived in Nigeria, the Digital Preservation Conference started on a high note. The preparations for the Monday Opening Ceremony took place on Sunday 2nd with the Ugandan participant joining at the venue in preparing the Hall and other ancillaries concerning the conference. 

Day 1: The Opening Ceremony conference commenced at 11.45am on Monday, 3rd September 2018. In attendance were dignitaries from public and private sectors. The Chairman of the occasion was Barrister D. D. Fer who is the Acting Director of National Archives of Nigeria. Dr Abiola Abioye, the Chairman of the NLA-PACS delivered a welcome address. The Keynote addresswas given by Prof. G. Olubunmi Alegbeleye of  Babcock University, Ilisan Remo who is the Founding Chairman of the Section. Prof Alegbeleye dwelt on the imperatives of digital preservation having regards to the unique nature of digital information resources. James Lowry, a digital preservation expert at Liverpool University Centre for Archive Studies, University of Liverpool, United Kingdom contributed a keynote remotely. His keynote focused on digital preservation in a recessed economy with stringent budgets.

Goodwill messages were received from the National Librarian/CEO, National Library of Nigeria, Director-General of National Information Technology Development Agency (NITDA) and former President of Nigerian Library Association, Alhaji Rilwanu Abdulsalam. The representatives of the Head of Department of Library, Archival and Information Studies, University of Ibadan and the Director of African Regional Centre for Information Studies also presented goodwill messages on their behalf. The Comptroller-General of the Nigerian Immigration Service was also represented at the opening ceremony. The Director of the FCT Archives and History Bureau, Ms. Cyril Jogai and the Librarian of the Nigerian National Petroleum Company (NNPC) were also in attendance. The high point of the opening ceremony was the unveiling of the Section's website which participants at the opening ceremony instantly logged on to using the link https://nlapac.ng to gain access. The role of the International Association for Social Science Information Science and Technology (IASSIST) in sponsoring the conference, was acknowledged and emphasized and IASSIST's relevance in digital preservation was highlighted. Group photographs were taken and refreshments served.

Immediately after the opening ceremony, 3 paper presentations by Prof. G.O. Alegbeleye, Dr. Akinniyi Adeleke and Dr. Ngozi Azubogu were taken. The first speaker presented An Overview of Digital Preservation strategies while the other speakers presented two case studies of Digital Preservation from Tekena Tamuno University Libray, Adeleke University, Ede, and the Federal University of Technology, Owerri Library respectively. The session was chaired by Prof Yacob Haliso of Babcock University, Ilisan-Remo, Ogun State, Nigeria.

Day 2: Three Posters were presented by Grace Ikenna; Dr D'Anna Shotts and Anthonia Ahima; and Adetoun Oyelude on different aspects of digital preservation. The first was on the state of digital preservation in the Kenneth Dike Library, University of Ibadan, Nigeria; the second on the progress of digitization in the Northeastern Baptist collection in Nigeria while the third was on the impact of IASSIST on digital preservation in the African Region. Datasheets on IASSIST were distributed to participants at the conference. They were encouraged to visit the IASSIST website and join the network as Africa was poorly represented in IASSIST. 

Apart from posters, six papers were presentated in very stimulating sessions by Dr. Ezra Gbaje & Prof. Umar Ibrahim; Omobolade Adeagbo/Sunday Obadare/Femi Oguntuase & Samson Akande; Kathryn Phillips & Edidiong Eyo in the morning session. The afternoon session had Prince Jacob Igwe & Chidinma; Ifeyinwa Okafor & Olalekan Awujoola and Aishat Egbunu/ Adeyinka Koiki-Owoyele & Adefunke Alabi presenting on preserving cultural heritage through digital preservation. After each session activities, lots of networking, exchange of ideas, international perspectives... name it!

Day 3- even more exciting! Four papers by Dr. Benedict Oladele; Titilayo Ilesanmi; Christopher Okiki & Racheal Odunlade; and Adetoun Oyelude & Winny Akullo were delivered in the morning session which sparked stimulating discussions.

One needed to be there to listen to the afternoon session by Abass Mustapha on Audio-Visual Digital Preservation of Yoruba Indigenous Knowledge and its economic benefits, as well as the Busicon Exhibitor's presentation on equipment for Digital Preservation and methods for it, presented by Lola Akanbi, the CEO of the company. Quite a package! Participants were practically 'chased out' from the venue at 5.45pm, almost two hours beyond target, not due to lateness, but to the lively discussions that kept coming. See!

And... without doubt, NLA-PACS is creating a networking family that say nothing to each other, but come out with a colour code, simply coincidental! *Code purple!*. It was fun!

Day 4: The Grand finale was grand! The three papers that ended the conference were information packed, by Isaac Ajibola; Rachael Odunlade & Chris Okiki; plus a final one from Okwor, Ihekwoaba et al. The wrap-up, putting the communique together was another interesting exercise. The communiquehas been issued! It can be found on the NLA-PACS website. In closing the conference, the NLA-PACS Chairman, Dr. Abiola Abioye expressed appreciation to all those who contributed in various respects to make the conference a reality. On the whole, the Digital Preservation Conference 2018 was a huge success. Lessons were however, learnt which will properly position NLA-PACS for the next conference at which participants are expecting hands-on workshops. 

Not less than 15 participants from Africa promised to join the IASSIST network, and 3 who were members but in default, promising to renew their membership and also contribute to the next IASSIST conference in Sydney, Australia. The support from IASSIST ensured that the NLA-PACS website is up and running; making the Section the 3rd Section of the Nigerian Library Association to have a website (in spite of being almost the newest Section); and also producing "a most exciting conference which even though the first of its kind, is already giving the NLA Cataloguing Classification and Indexing Section (the best Section for the year 2017) a hot competition as the best," as described by a participant. The conference evaluation forms gave lots more comments, even on the innovative conference bags favoured by many participants!  The Section is already looking forward to NLA-PACS 2019, the best yet to come!

IASSIST Quarterly Volume 42:3 now available!

Editor's notes:  Digital curation after digital extraction for data sharing

Welcome to the third issue of volume 42 of the IASSIST Quarterly (IQ 42:3, 2018).

The IASSIST Quarterly presents in this issue three papers from geographically widespread countries. We call IASSIST ‘International’, so I am happy to present papers from three continents in this issue with papers from Zimbabwe, Italy and Canada.

The paper 'The State of Preparedness for Digital Curation and Preservation: A Case Study of a Developing Country Academic Library' is by Phillip Ndhlovu, who works as the institutional repository librarian and liaison librarian, and Thomas Matingwina, who is a lecturer at the Department of Library and Information Service at the National University of Science and Technology (NUST) in Bulawayo, Zimbabwe. Modern day libraries have vast amounts of digital content and the authors noted that because these collections require very different management than the traditional paper-based materials, the new materials’ longevity is endangered. Their study assessed the state of preparedness of the NUST Library for digital curation and preservation, including the assessment of awareness, competencies, technology infrastructure, digital disaster preparedness, and challenges to digital curation and preservation. They found a lack of policies, lack of expertise by library staff, and lack of funding.

You might conclude that investigating your own organization and reaching the very well known conclusion that 'we need more money!' is not so surprising. However, you have to take note that the Jeff Rothenberg statement from 1995 that 'Digital information lasts forever – or five years, whichever comes first' has not yet sunk in with politicians and administrators, who will immediately associate the term 'digital' with 'saving money'. This study shows them why this is not a valid connotation. It is a study of a single institution, and as the authors note it cannot be generalized even to other academic libraries in Zimbabwe. However, other libraries - also outside Zimbabwe - have here a good guide for making their own assessment of the digital preparedness of their institution. 

The second paper was - as was the paper above - presented at the IASSIST conference in 2018 and is also about the transition from media known for thousands of years to new media and digital forms. Peter Peller presented the paper 'From Paper Map to Geospatial Vector Layer: Demystifying the Process'. He is the Director of the Spatial and Numeric Data Services unit at Libraries and Cultural Resources at the University of Calgary in Canada. 

The conversion of raster images of maps to vector data is analogous to OCR technologies extracting words from scanned print documents. Thereby the map information becomes more accessible, and usable in geographic information systems (GIS). An illustrative example is that historical geospatial information can be overlaid in Google Earth. The description of the entire process incorporates examples of the various techniques, including different types of editing. Furthermore, descriptions of the software used in selected studies are listed in the appendix. It is mentioned that 'paper texture and ink spread' can be responsible for introducing noise and errors, so remember to keep the old maps. This is because what is considered noise in one context might become the subject for interesting future research. In addition the software for extracting information will most certainly improve.

For once both the author and we at IASSIST Quarterly have been quite fast. The data for the third paper was collected in late 2017 and the results are presented here only a year later. In October 2017 a message appeared on the IASSIST mail list with the start of the sentence 'I would share the data but...' It quickly generated many ways of completing that sentence. Flavio Bonifacio - who works at Metis Ricerche srl in Torino, Italy - quickly launched a questionnaire sent to members of the mail list and to others from similar communities of interested individuals. The questionnaire was an extension of an earlier one concerning scientists' reuse and sharing of data. The paper includes many tabulations and models showing the background as well as the data sharing attitudes found in the survey. A respondent typology is developed based upon the level of propensity for sharing data and the level of experiencing problems in data sharing into a 2-by-2 table consisting of 'irreducible reluctant', 'reducible reluctant', 'problematic follower', and 'premium follower'.    

In the Nordic countries we tend to have the impression that certain services are publicly available and for free. This impression is plainly superficial because we Nordic people also know very well that 'there is no such thing as a free lunch'! All services must be paid for in one way or another. If you have many services that carry no direct cost, it is probably because you - and others - paid for them beforehand through taxation. Because of cuts in the public economy one of the things Flavio Bonifacio wanted to investigate was the question 'Is there a market for selling data-sharing services?' The results imply that 'reducible reluctants' can be a target for services that reduce the problems of that group.

Submissions of papers for the IASSIST Quarterly are always very welcome. We welcome input from IASSIST conferences or other conferences and workshops, from local presentations or papers especially written for the IQ. When you are preparing such a presentation, give a thought to turning your one-time presentation into a lasting contribution. Doing that after the event also gives you the opportunity of improving your work after feedback. We encourage you to login or create an author login to https://www.iassistquarterly.com (our Open Journal System application). We permit authors 'deep links' into the IQ as well as deposition of the paper in your local repository. Chairing a conference session with the purpose of aggregating and integrating papers for a special issue IQ is also much appreciated as the information reaches many more people than the limited number of session participants and will be readily available on the IASSIST Quarterly website at https://www.iassistquarterly.com.  Authors are very welcome to take a look at the instructions and layout:

https://www.iassistquarterly.com/index.php/iassist/about/submissions

Authors can also contact me directly via e-mail: kbr@sam.sdu.dk. Should you be interested in compiling a special issue for the IQ as guest editor(s) I will also be delighted to hear from you.

Karsten Boye Rasmussen - November 2018

Data Workshop Conducted at the National Library of Uganda

By Winny Nekesa Akullo, Uganda Library and Information Associations 

I won sponsorship from the International Association for Social Science Information Services and Technology (IASSIST) for a One-day Data workshop conducted on 29th November 2018 at the National Library of Uganda on behalf of the Uganda Library and Information Associations (ULIA). The workshop aimed at bringing together librarians from different institutions in Uganda to learn how to collect relevant and meaningful data to tell stories relating to the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The workshop attracted 20 librarians from government departments, academia, public and community libraries.

 

The workshop was facilitated by Dr. Sarah Kaddu, the President, ULIA and Mr. Eric Haumba, Chief Librarian, YMCA Comprehensive Institute and moderated by Ms. Winny Nekesa Akullo, the Publicity Secretary of ULIA, IASSIST Event Liaison Officer and a member of IASSIST.

The workshop topics included; The UN 2030 Agenda and AU Agenda 2063; the role of libraries in the 2030 Agenda and” Telling Your Story” Tracking and Collection of Relevant Data Template for Documenting Stories. At the end of the workshop participants were presented with certificates of participations.

In his opening remarks, the Director of the National Library of Uganda, Mr. Adonia Katungisa, noted that the workshop was timely and more relevant to the librarians considering that the policy makers and researchers are now demanding for data and statistics to enable them make informed decisions and planning for the libraries in the country. Its therefore, time for people to know what libraries are doing.

Dr. Kaddu on the other hand emphasized that as librarians, “we need to work closely within the profession and other sectors to achieve UN 2030 Agenda”, she implored the participants to use statistics to advocate for positive change in their societies. Using relevant data is a very good way to support our advocacy and tell our stories. There is need to define the purpose for the data, what data do you need, where to find the data, explain the data and connect the numbers to the story you are trying to tell. 

Therefore, there is need to strengthen data collection, management and dissemination to capture evidence to inform decision making.

Feedback from the participants indicated the objective of the workshop was fully achieved and the quality of the results at the workshop was high quality. The participants also recommended for establishment of a database/system to collect library statistics and activities countrywide and training in data literacy skills to ensure that data are used and interpreted correctly.

The Participants were very enthusiastic to be part of the workshop and also looked forward to joining IASSIST as members.

We are very grateful to IASSIST for its support without which this workshop wouldn’t have been possible.

Data Workshop Conducted at the National Library of Uganda

By Winny Nekesa Akullo, Uganda Library and Information Associations 

I won sponsorship from the International Association for Social Science Information Services and Technology (IASSIST) for a One-day Data workshop conducted on 29th November 2018 at the National Library of Uganda on behalf of the Uganda Library and Information Associations (ULIA). The workshop aimed at bringing together librarians from different institutions in Uganda to learn how to collect relevant and meaningful data to tell stories relating to the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The workshop attracted 20 librarians from government departments, academia, public and community libraries.

The workshop was facilitated by Dr. Sarah Kaddu, the President, ULIA and Mr. Eric Haumba, Chief Librarian, YMCA Comprehensive Institute and moderated by Ms. Winny Nekesa Akullo, the Publicity Secretary of ULIA, IASSIST Event Liaison Officer and a member of IASSIST.

The workshop topics included; The UN 2030 Agenda and AU Agenda 2063; the role of libraries in the 2030 Agenda and” Telling Your Story” Tracking and Collection of Relevant Data Template for Documenting Stories. At the end of the workshop participants were presented with certificates of participations.

In his opening remarks, the Director of the National Library of Uganda, Mr. Adonia Katungisa, noted that the workshop was timely and more relevant to the librarians considering that the policy makers and researchers are now demanding for data and statistics to enable them make informed decisions and planning for the libraries in the country. Its therefore, time for people to know what libraries are doing.

Dr. Kaddu on the other hand emphasized that as librarians, “we need to work closely within the profession and other sectors to achieve UN 2030 Agenda”, she implored the participants to use statistics to advocate for positive change in their societies. Using relevant data is a very good way to support our advocacy and tell our stories. There is need to define the purpose for the data, what data do you need, where to find the data, explain the data and connect the numbers to the story you are trying to tell. 

Therefore, there is need to strengthen data collection, management and dissemination to capture evidence to inform decision making.

Feedback from the participants indicated the objective of the workshop was fully achieved and the quality of the results at the workshop was high quality. The participants also recommended for establishment of a database/system to collect library statistics and activities countrywide and training in data literacy skills to ensure that data are used and interpreted correctly.

The Participants were very enthusiastic to be part of the workshop and also looked forward to joining IASSIST as members.

We are very grateful to IASSIST for its support without which this workshop wouldn’t have been possible.

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