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IASSIST Conferences

Conferences important to data professionals.

Now Accepting Proposals for IASSIST 2013

IASSIST 2013 will be hosted by GESIS – Leibniz Institute for the Social Sciences at Maternushaus in Cologne, Germany from May 28-31.

The Conference Website can be accessed here: http://www.iassist2013.org/iassist-2013-home/

As announced previously, the theme of this year’s conference is Data Innovation: Increasing Accessibility, Visibility and Sustainability

This theme reflects recent efforts across the globe by the largest government agencies down to the smaller independent research units to make data (be it survey, administrative, geospatial, or scientific) more open, accessible and understandable for all.

With an ever-increasing availability of new technologies offering unparalleled opportunities to sustainably deliver, share, model and visualize data, we anticipate that there is much to share with and much to learn from one another.  Interdisciplinarity is a large part of where innovation comes from, and we hope to receive submissions from those in the social sciences, humanities, sciences, and computer science fields.

We welcome submissions on the theme outlined above, and encourage conference participants to propose papers and sessions that would be of interest to a diverse audience. In order to make session formation and scheduling more streamlined, we have created three distinct tracks.  If you are not sure where your submission fits, or feel that it fits into more than one track, that’s perfectly fine. Please do still make your submission, and if accepted, we will find an appropriate fit.

Online submission forms and guidelines for BOTH conference content and workshops are be found here: http://www.iassist2013.org/conference/calls/

NOTE: The top of the page is for sessions/papers/posters/round tables/pecha kuchas the bottom is for workshops – please note that the submission forms are completely separate.

All submissions are due by December 5, 2012.  Notification of acceptance will be made by February 5, 2012

Questions about session/paper submissions may be sent to iassist.twentythirteen@gmail.com
Questions about workshop submission may be sent to the Workshop Coordinator, Lynda Kellam at lmkellam@uncg.edu

- Friday posting -

One of the highlights of the after hours hanging out during IASSIST conferences is getting to play some pool and make geeky data jokes you don't have to explain to anyone.  

For you pool-playing enthusiasts, I share this YouTube of a potential future IASSIST conference goer .. (note, none of us can play anywhere near the level of this 5 yr old.) 

Happy Weekend everyone! 

Videos from the IASSIST 2011 Plenaries

Hello - for those who were not able to attend IASSIST 2011 and for those asking to have access to video presentations, the two videos of the Plenaries from IASSIST 2011 are now available for viewing:

Chuck Humphrey - Data Library Coordinator, University of Alberta
Research Data Infrastructure: Are the Social Sciences on Main Street or a Side Road?

Chuck Humphrey is passionate about data and has been examining research data infrastructure with a global perspective. His talk will locate the social sciences in the broader E-science picture and give us a glimpse of the future.

Plenary II 

Date: Thursday, June 02 

Video   

 

Andrea Reimer - Councillor, City of Vancouver
Open Data in Vancouver: The Inspiration and the Vision


Andrea Reimer is a Councillor for the city of Vancouver and is a passionate advocate for democracy and civic engagement. The City of Vancouver has led the way with the adoption of a resolution in May [2009] that endorsed open and accessible data, open standards, and open source software. Ms Reimer has been heavily involved in this initiative and will share her passion with IASSIST.

Plenary III 

Date: Friday, June 03 

Video

 

The QuickTime .mov files are available in a variety of viewing formats: via desktops, iPhone, iPod, iPad, smartphones.

We have had various and mixed reports on streaming successes. These are large Video files (each over an Hour in length), so patience is required.


New Look for Past Conferences Web Pages

We are pleased to present the new layout for the Past Conferences section of the website. Follow the [presentations] links for 2009 and 2010 to see the new layout.  Past conference pages from 2000 to 2008 will be converted in the weeks to come. All presentations since 2000 have now been preserved in pdf format to ensure future access to the files.

Thanks go out to the webteam for their hard work in making this possible.

Minutes 2009

Meeting of the General Assembly, Thursday, May 28, 2009, Tampere, Finland

1. Welcome – M Wright, President

2. Approval of the minutes of the previous AGM (2008)

Minutes for 2008 are labeled 2007. Motion to accept as amended passes.

3. Executive Officers Report

Treasurer – J Green more...

Special IQ: Moving Research Data Into and Out of Institutional Repositories

The IASSIST Quarterly IQ Vol. 31 issue 3&4 is now available on the web:

http://iassistdata.org/publications/iq/iqvol31.html

This issue will only be available on the web. There will be no printed version mailed out to the membership.

This double issue is the work of the authors and their articles are introduced below. We are presenting an integrated double issue of high quality. We should also give a special thanks to the editors of the issue. Gretchen Gano is the writing guest editor of this IQ as you can see below. Gretchen Gano is the Assistant Curator Librarian for Public Administration & Government Information and Coordinator, Data Service Studio at New York University Libraries. Gretchen Gano collaborated on this issue from the start with former IASSIST president Ann Green. Together with the authors a great issue has been made.

Enjoy

Karsten Boye Rasmussen, IQ editor, associate professor, kbr@sam.sdu.dk, Marketing & Management, SDU, University of Southern Denmark +45 6550 2115

Guest Editor's Notes:

The 2008 IASSIST Conference, “Technology of Data: Collection, Communication, Access and Preservation” included a session entitled “Moving Research Data Into and Out of Institutional Repositories” from which several papers emerged. In “Interoperability Between Institutional and Data Repositories: a Pilot Project at MIT”, Katherine McNeill describes a pilot project to enhance study discovery between two repository systems housed in the same institution, DSpace and the Institute for Quantitative Social Science Dataverse Network, by enabling the harvesting and replication of metadata and content across the two systems. In a related project across the pond, Libby Bishop scales this discussion in her description of crossinstitutional collection sharing between the University of Leeds and the UK Data Archive in the Timescapes project. Bishop asserts that coordination among multiple agents is likely to be challenging under any circumstances. Challenges magnify when the trajectories of different life cycles, for research projects and for data sharing, are considered. Robin Rice echoes these sentiments in her article on the DISC-UK DataShare Project, a collaboration between the Universities of Edinburgh, Oxford and Southampton and the London School of Economics. Rice provides visual evidence in a compelling diagram of the data sharing continuum based on storage, discovery, and preservation conditions of the digital research materials at each level along the scale -- from the lowly thumb drive to the officious national archive. We see plainly that as one moves up the continuum, more and more human effort and intervention is required to craft the discovery, access, analytic and preservation environment. In other words, data curators matter.

Two other papers tackle these challenges by emphasizing the needs of data producers. Luis Martinez-Uribe introduces the University of Oxford’s Scoping Digital Repository Services for Research Data Management project and the findings of a requirement gathering exercise. While the study results reveal researchers’ needs and workflows. Martinez-Uribe asserts that the study process itself made an impact on the participants. Study participants reflected on and, as a result, fine-tuned how they work with data, why they create these materials in the first place and were able to articulate reasons for managing these resources the way they do. Similarly, Research Data & Environmental Sciences Librarian, Gail Steinhart, writes about the development of DataStaR, a Data Staging Repository hosted by Cornell University’s Albert R. Mann Library. The project developed as a “managed workspace” where researchers contribute datasets they are still actively using in direct response to questions that have to do with sharing in the active research environment, rather than an archival one.

While the authors in this issue describe projects going on in many different places and settings, taken together, these articles address common themes. All address the challenge of scaling data exchange between systems and then between institutions. This raises the perennial question of standards: by what mechanisms will we set them, and how well will we be able to follow them and still accommodate local needs? The importance of aligning repository services with researcher needs is another common thread. Data managers must ask, “how will the active researcher benefit from curation efforts”? The answer may be that benefit is more than finding or accessing a particular resource (yep, I have downloaded the whole thing and all the bits are there), but instead being able to examine this resource in many ways (okay, lets run frequencies, now I want to see it on a map, and let’s include some other variables). This is a rich reuse experience, creating a real digital “laboratory.”

Finally, each contributor notes the expanding role of data manager. In its own way, each project described here moves data managers upstream, pre-publication, into the place where research is actively happening. Though all of the articles focus on technological choices and architectures to support research data curation, it is striking to realize that each of these choices emerge from old-fashioned personal, social, and organizational relationships. What we can strive for as data and information managers is to work together as fellow researchers and to be ever curious about how these partnerships and the sharing of information back and forth can be enhanced by thoughtful information and technology design. Some call this the digital plumbing, but I like to think of it as e-gilding.

Gretchen Gano, New York University Libraries

Registration for the IASSIST 2009 is open

Tervetuloa Tampereelle, Welcome to Tampere!

 

Registration for the 2009 IASSIST conference is now officially open. On the conference web site there is more information on registration, accommodations and excursions.

  more...

new IQ

The IASSIST Quarterly (IQ Vol. 31 issue 1 - 2007) is now available on the web:

 

http://iassistdata.org/publications/iq/iqvol31.html

The IASSIST Quarterly (IQ Vol. 31 issue 1 - 2007) is now available on the web:

 

http://iassistdata.org/publications/iq/iqvol31.html

  more...

IASSIST 2008 Accommodations and Registration Reminder

Happy Earth Day to everyone!!

Hope your day is filled with loads of celebratory reducing, renewing, and recycling.

Registration for this year's IASSIST Conference (May 27-30): "Technology of Data: Collection, Communication, Access and Preservation" is proceeding at a rumbling pace, and the five conference hotels have been filling with eager California-bound IASSISTers.
  • IASSIST Quarterly

    Publications Special issue: A pioneer data librarian
    Welcome to the special volume of the IASSIST Quarterly (IQ (37):1-4, 2013). This special issue started as exchange of ideas between Libbie Stephenson and Margaret Adams to collect

    more...

  • Resources

    Resources

    A space for IASSIST members to share professional resources useful to them in their daily work. Also the IASSIST Jobs Repository for an archive of data-related position descriptions. more...

  • community

    • LinkedIn
    • Facebook
    • Twitter

    Find out what IASSISTers are doing in the field and explore other avenues of presentation, communication and discussion via social networking and related online social spaces. more...