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IASSIST 2016

IASSIST Quarterly (IQ) volume 40-2 is now on the website: Revolution in the air

Welcome to the second issue of Volume 40 of the IASSIST Quarterly (IQ 40:2, 2016). We present three papers in this issue.

http://iassistdata.org/iq/issue/40/2

First, there are two papers on the Data Documentation Initiative that have their own special introduction. I want to express my respect and gratitude to Joachim Wackerow (GESIS - Leibniz Institute for the Social Sciences). Joachim (Achim) and Mary Vardigan (University of Michigan) have several times and for many years communicated to and advised the readers of the IASSIST Quarterly on the continuing development of the DDI. The metadata of data is central for the use and reuse of data, and we have come a long way through the efforts of many people.    

The IASSIST 2016 conference in Bergen was a great success - I am told. I was not able to attend but heard that the conference again was 'the best ever'. I was also told that among the many interesting talks and inputs at the conference Matthew Woollard's keynote speech on 'Data Revolution' was high on the list. Good to have well informed informers! Matthew Woollard is Director of the UK Data Archive at the University of Essex. Here in the IASSIST Quarterly we bring you a transcript of his talk. Woollard starts his talk on the data revolution with the possibility of bringing to users access to data, rather than bringing data to users. The data is in the 'cloud' - in the air - 'Revolution in the air' to quote a Nobel laureate. We are not yet in the post-revolutionary phase and many issues still need to be addressed. Woollard argues that several data skills are in demand, like an understanding of data management and of the many ethical issues. Although he is not enthusiastic about the term 'Big Data', Woollard naturally addresses the concept as these days we cannot talk about data - and surely not about data revolution - without talking about Big Data. I fully support his view that we should proceed with caution, so that we are not simply replacing surveys where we 'ask more from fewer' with big data that give us 'less from more'. The revolution gives us new possibilities, and we will see more complex forms of research that will challenge data skills and demand solutions at data service institutions.  

Papers for the IASSIST Quarterly are always very welcome. We welcome input from IASSIST conferences or other conferences and workshops, from local presentations or papers especially written for the IQ. When you are preparing a presentation, give a thought to turning your one-time presentation into a lasting contribution. We permit authors 'deep links' into the IQ as well as deposition of the paper in your local repository. Chairing a conference session with the purpose of aggregating and integrating papers for a special issue IQ is also much appreciated as the information reaches many more people than the session participants, and will be readily available on the IASSIST website at http://www.iassistdata.org

Authors are very welcome to take a look at the instructions and layout:

http://iassistdata.org/iq/instructions-authors

Authors can also contact me via e-mail: kbr@sam.sdu.dk. Should you be interested in compiling a special issue for the IQ as guest editor(s) I will also be delighted to hear from you.

Karsten Boye Rasmussen   
Editor, IASSIST Quarterly

IQ 40:1 Now Available!

Our World and all the Local Worlds
Welcome to the first issue of Volume 40 of the IASSIST
Quarterly (IQ 40:1, 2016). We present four papers in this issue.
The first paper presents data from our very own world,
extracted from papers published in the IQ through four
decades. What is published in the IQ is often limited in
geographical scope and in this issue the other three papers
present investigations and project research carried out at
New York University, Purdue University, and the Federal
Reserve System. However, the subject scope of the papers
and the methods employed bring great diversity. And
although the papers are local in origin they all have a strong
focus for generalization in order to spread the information
and experience.


We proudly present the paper that received the 'best
paper award' at the IASSIST conference 2015. Great thanks
are expressed to all the reviewers who took part in the
evaluation! In the paper 'Social Science Data Archives: A
Historical Social Network Analysis' the authors Kristin R.
Eschenfelder (University of Wisconsin-Madison), Morgaine
Gilchrist Scott, Kalpana Shankar, and Greg Downey
are reporting on inter-organizational influence and
collaboration among social science data archives through
data of articles published in IASSIST Quarterly in 1976
to 2014. The paper demonstrates social network analysis
(SNA) using a web of 'nodes' (people/authors/institutions)
and 'links' (relationships between nodes). Several types
of relationships are identified: influencing, collaborating,
funding, and international. The dynamics are shown in
detail by employing five year sections. I noticed that from
a reluctant start the amount of relationships has grown
significantly and archives have continuously grown better
at bringing in 'influence' from other 'nodes'. The paper
contributes to the history of social science data archives and
the shaping of a research discipline.


The paper 'Understanding Academic Patrons’ Data Needs
through Virtual Reference Transcripts: Preliminary Findings
from New York University Libraries' is authored by Margaret
Smith and Jill Conte who are both librarians at New York
University, and Samantha Guss, a librarian at University
of Richmond who worked at New York University from
2009-14. The goal of their paper is 'to contribute to the
growing body of knowledge about how information
needs are conceptualized and articulated, and how this
knowledge can be used to improve data reference in an
academic library setting'. This is carried out by analysis of
chat transcripts of requests for census data at NYU. There is
a high demand for the virtual services of the NYU Libraries
and there are as many as 15,000 annual chat transactions.
There has not been much qualitative research of users'
data needs, but here the authors exemplify the iterative
nature of grounded theory with data collection and analysis
processes inextricably entwined and also using a range of
software tools like FileLocator Pro, TextCrawler, and Dedoose.
Three years of chat reference transcripts were filtered down
to 147 transcripts related to United States and international
census data. The unique data provides several insights,
shown in the paper. However, the authors are also aware of
the limitations in the method as it did not include whether
the patron or librarian considered the interaction successful.
The conclusion is that there is a need for additional librarian
training and improved research guides.


The third paper is also from a university. Amy Barton, Paul
J. Bracke, Ann Marie Clark, all from Purdue University,
collaborated on the paper 'Digitization, Data Curation,
and Human Rights Documents: Case Study of a Library
Researcher-Practitioner Collaboration'. The project
concerns the digitization of Urgent Action Bulletins of
Amnesty International from 1974 to 2007. The political
science research centered on changes of transnational
human rights advocacy and legal instrumentation, while
the Libraries’ research related to data management,
metadata, data lifecycle, etcetera. The specific research
collaboration model developed was also generalized for
future practitioner-librarian collaboration projects. The
project is part of a recent tendency where academic
libraries will improve engagement and combine activities
between libraries and users and institutions. The project
attempts to integrate two different lifecycle models thus
serving both research and curatorial goals where the
central question is: 'can digitization processes be designed
in a manner that feeds directly into analytical workflows
of social science researchers, while still meeting the
needs of the archive or library concerned with long-term
stewardship of the digitized content?'. The project builds
on data of Urgent Action Bulletins produced by Amnesty
International for indication of how human rights concerns
changed over time, and the threats in different countries
at different periods, as well as combining library standards
for digitization and digital collections with researcher-driven
metadata and coding strategies. The data creation
started with the scanning and creation of the optical
character recognized (OCR) version of full text PDFs for text
recognition and modeling in NVivo software. The project
did succeed in developing shared standards. However, a
fundamental challenge was experienced in the grant-driven
timelines for both library and researcher. It seems to me that
the expectation of parallel work was the challenge to the
project. Things take time.


In the fourth paper we enter the case of the Federal Reserve
System. San Cannon and Deng Pan, working at the Federal
Reserve Bank in Kansas City and Chicago, created a pilot
for an infrastructure and workflow support for making the
publication of research data a regular part of the research
lifecycle. This is reported in the paper 'First Forays into
Research Data Dissemination: A Tale from the Kansas City
Fed'. More than 750 researchers across the system produce
yearly about 1,000 journal articles, working papers, etcetera.
The need for data to support the research has been
recognized, and the institution is setting up a repository
and defining a workflow to support data preservation
and future dissemination. In early 2015 the internal Center
for the Advancement of Research and Data in Economics
(CADRE) was established with a mission to support, enhance,
and advance data or computationally intensive research,
and preservation and dissemination were identified as
important support functions for CADRE. The paper presents
details and questions in the design such as types of
collections, kind and size of data files, and demonstrates
influence of testers and curators. The pilot also had to
decide on the metadata fields to be used when data is
submitted to the system. The complete setup including
incorporated fields was enhanced through pilot testing and
user feedback. The pilot is now being expanded to other
Federal Reserve Banks.


Papers for the IASSIST Quarterly are always very welcome.
We welcome input from IASSIST conferences or other
conferences and workshops, from local presentations or
papers especially written for the IQ. When you are preparing
a presentation, give a thought to turning your one-time
presentation into a lasting contribution. We permit authors
'deep links' into the IQ as well as deposition of the paper in
your local repository. Chairing a conference session with
the purpose of aggregating and integrating papers for a
special issue IQ is also much appreciated as the information
reaches many more people than the session participants,
and will be readily available on the IASSIST website at
http://www.iassistdata.org.


Authors are very welcome to take a look at the instructions
and layout: http://iassistdata.org/iq/instructions-authors.

Authors can also contact me via e-mail: kbr@sam.sdu.dk.
Should you be interested in compiling a special issue for
the IQ as guest editor(s) I will also be delighted to hear
from you.


Karsten Boye Rasmussen
June 2016
Editor

Feel the Berg! IASSIST 2016

Topic:

The conference began with a reception from the Mayor of Bergen, beautifully performed Norwegian folk song, and dissent over the conference hashtag (it was #iassist16).

The next morning data talk began with Gudmund Hernes. His plenary theme is data availability or the latest “revolution” is, as it always has, causing a shift in power. The role of IASSISTers and data archives should be to “keep the record straight”.

UK Data Service Director Matthew Woollard’s plenary offered a similar theme of adjustment to a changed data world. In sum, a data revolution is only mature when lots of the data created as part of this revolution is reusable. Therefore we need enhance trust between creators and participants, and advocate data quality rather than quantity. Look for a future IASSIST Quarterly article based on his plenary.

The theme of quality and reproducibility was captured in presentations by Christian (Odum) on data verification, which found reproducibly to be a resource intensive activity with 92 percent of manuscripts submitted to Odum requiring resubmission. Arguillas (Cornell) demonstrated R2 at CISER which runs replications. Their job is not to find errors on behalf of researchers but to check replication values; so if replicated study value is off by fraction of a decimal the study is not replicated. Again, it is a time intensive process so Arguillas advised researchers to “curate as you code and code with reuse in mind”. Brown (Cornell) talked about the CED2AR metadata repository that works primarily with those accessing or wishing to access restricted data files. Peer introduced Yale’s new curation tool. Curation for quality and reproducibility, she argued, will become routinized when research data policies and culture mature to recognise curation and sharing and tools to capture the entire workflow become embedded in the research process.

Highlights in other concurrent sessions I attended included Strategies for Discussing and Communicating Data Services where Herndon (Duke) and O’Reilly (Emory) emphasised how expectations of transparency and sharing have changed. Meanwhile, Terrence Bennett (The Collage of New Jersey) killed of his co-author in the name of data sharing to show how negative messages have more impact.

“Teaching data” themed sessions included a systematic “scaffolding” approach from Sapp Nelson (Perdue) on helping learners move across data management domains over time. Hofelich Mohr (Minnesota) and Motes (Surrey) demonstrated teaching activities at the University of Minnesota which included targeting courses with a research methods component. The results are positive, but the costs in resources are intensive and the need to be flexible is critical. Abbaspour (Lewis & Clark) presented lessons learnt from teaching undergraduate students about data, including the lesson that when it comes to licences undergraduate students have limited mental tolerance for a world that deals in shades of grey, and is not simple black and white.

Simpson and Wiltshire (UK Data Service) had presentations on supporting students and researchers in using either using data for dissertations or on using specific datasets. Scott’s (UK Data Service) audience was a little different: researchers applying to use sensitive data. One thing that was positive to see here is how sensitive data holding organisations in the UK are collaborating on this training.

A sizable cohort from the UK Administrative Data Research Network presented at IASSIST on how this service is tackling access to data and its responsible reuse. Presentations from Knight and Greci provide examples. Continuing the theme of responsible reuse, Segadal (NSD) outlined the incoming European Union regulation on general data protection and how it will affect researchers.

The international in IASSIST was demonstrated in a session on Research Data Management Services, with speakers from Denmark, Canada, and India. Fink and Olesen (DDA) presented the role the Danish National Archive will play in supporting Data Management Planning. Mowers (Ottawa) presented a range of research data on management and sharing practices that will inform support. Gunjal (NIT Rourkela) presented on the RDM challenges in India, his institution as a case study, and on initiatives to build Indian data infrastructure.

A couple of librarian orientated sessions provided insights. Solis (NYU) offered findings on her research into economics graduate students data-seeking behaviour, finding a lot of intuitive independent data gathering activity and, worryingly, a “liberal” attitude to sharing licenced data and a perturbing attitude that if something is online then it will always be online. Hogenboom (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign) talked about building small dataset collections, considering decisions on the basis of licence terms, quality, money available, potential future use of data, and who is requesting. Blake (Michigan) talked about a data grants programme they ran which saw researchers competitively apply for data resources. Nobel (ICPSR) presented on their curating content activity, deciding to curate studies submitted to Open ICPSR on the basis of methodological rigour, reputation, high priority data, data and documentation quality.

The other data librarian session was built around a new book edited by Kellam (UNCG) and Thompson (Windsor) and featuring a panel of IASSISTers. No spoilers. Go and buy the book. But it was interesting to hear how people found themselves in data librarian positions, the different aspects of the role, and critically, the wide ranging and (unrealistic?) expectations under which data librarian positions are advertised.

A closing mention goes to this year’s conference paper winners: Lafferty Hess and Christian (ODUM) for their paper "More Data, Less Process: The Applicability of MPLP to Research Data" in which they ask what the “golden minimum” is for archiving digital data.

Finally, IASSIST recognised Libby Stephenson and Ann Green with achievement awards for too many accomplishments to cover in this blog post.

The conference closed with a little less polished singing than the reception featured, hashtag wars resolved, and the IASSIST banner packed and headed for #iassist17 in Lawrence, Kansas.

#iassist16 tweets are Storified (including #iassist2016 tweets).

IASSIST 2016 Conference Papers Announcement

Topic:

Hello IASSISTers,

Thank you for the outstanding participation in this year's Conference Paper Competition! We received a lot of quality submissions that will be presented next week at IASSIST 2016 in Bergen, Norway. 

In advance of the conference, and on behalf of the Program Committee, I'd like to announce the winners and runner-ups for the 2016 Conference Paper Award:

Congratulations to Sophia Lafferty Hess and Thu-Mai Christian from ODUM for their paper titled "More Data, Less Process: The Applicability of MPLP to Research Data"!

And, the first runner-up: “Image Data Management as a Data Service” by Berenica Vejvoda, K. Jane Burpee and Paula Lackie

Second runner-up: “Mitigating Survey Fraud and Human Error: Lessons Learned From A Low Budget Village Census in Bangladesh” by Muhammad F. Bhuiyan and Paula Lackie

Many thanks to Berenica Vejvoda, Coordinator, and the team of evaluators:

Jennifer Green
Wendy Mann
Kathleen Fear
James Ng
Inna Kouper
Laine Ruus
Matthew Gertler
Ron Nakao
Tom Lindsay

Berenica will be giving a presentation about the papers at the business lunch (see Conference Program), so if you are attending, more information will be provided there.

All of the papers will be eligible for publication in the IASSIST Quarterly. For more information about publishing in the IQ, please contact Karsten Rasmussen

See you in Bergen!

Best,
Amber & Florio

New to IASSIST or Willing to Mentor Someone New?

Topic:

 

New to IASSIST or Willing to Mentor Someone New?

We are excited to have new members in IASSIST. IASSIST is a home for data services professionals across many disciplines: librarians, data archivists, open data proponents, data support staff, etc. For some, it is an organization where you don’t have to explain what you do because our members already understand. We get metadata, data support, data access issues, database challenges, the challenge of replication and so much more! Although we are a long-established organization, new members are the lifeblood of IASSIST!
  Networking is a great benefit of attending the IASSIST conference but the week quickly goes by and and it can be daunting to join a lively group like this. To get the most out of your membership, we encourage everyone to join the IASSIST mentorship program. Please answer the following questions so we can match mentors and mentees. We will try to match you with someone who has similar interests and experiences. If you know of anyone who will be participating that you would like to be matched with, please indicate below. Please sign up by Friday, May 13. Conference contact assignments for IASSIST will be emailed by the end of the day Tuesday, May 17.You can register in Google Forms 
https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1l1M58RqsGiamN2z1wPQwzCyqwdU9Z3ETMbnJoZzpPvY/viewform?c=0&w=1

If you have any questions, please contact Bobray Bordelon (bordelon@princeton.edu). Thank you for participating & see you in Bergen!

Interested in the “data revolution” and what it means for research? Here’s why you should attend IASSIST2016

 

Part 1: Data sharing, new data sources and data protection

IASSIST is an international organisation of information technology and data services professionals which aims to provide support to research and teaching in the social sciences. It has over 300 members ranging from data archive staff and librarians to statistical agencies, government departments and non-profit organisations.

The theme of this year’s conference is Embracing the ‘data revolution’: opportunities and challenges for research” and it is the 42nd of its kind, taking place every year. IASSIST2016 will take place in Bergen, Norway, from 31 May to 3 June, hosted by NSD - Norwegian Centre for Research Data.

Here is a first snapshot of what is there and why it is important.

Data sharing

If you have ever wondered whether data sharing is to the advantage of researchers, there will be a session led by Utrecht University Library exploring the matter. The first results of a survey which explores personal beliefs, intention and behaviour regarding the sharing of data will also be presented by GESIS. The relationship between data sharing and data citation, relatively overlooked until now, will then be addressed by the Australian Data Archive.

If you are interested in how a data journal could incentivise replications in economics, you should think about attending a session by ZBW Leibniz Information Centre for Economics which will present some studies describing the outcome of replication attempts and discuss the meaning of failed replications in economics.

GESIS will then look into improving research data sharing by addressing different scholarly target groups such as individual researchers, academic institutions, or scientific journals, all of which place diverse demands on a data sharing tool. They will focus on the tools offered by GESIS as well as a joint tool, “SowiDataNet”, offered together with the Social Science Centre Berlin, the German Institute for Economic Research, and the German National Library of Economic.

The UKDA and UKDS will present a paper which seeks to explore the role that case studies of research can play in regard to effective data sharing, reuse and impact.

The Data Archive in Finland (FSD) will also be presented as a case study of an archive that is broadening its services to the health sciences and humanities, disciplines in which data sharing practices have not yet been established.

If you’d like to know more about data accessibility, which is being required by journals and mandated by government funders, join a diverse group of open data experts as IASSIST dives into open data dialogue that includes presentations on Open Data and Citizen Empowerment and 101 Cool Things to do with Open Data as part of the “Opening up on open data workshop.” Presenters will be from archives from across the globe.

New data sources

A talk entitled “Data science: The future of social science?” by UKDA will introduce its conceptual and technical work in developing a big data platform for social science and outline preliminary findings from work using energy data.

If you have been wondering about the role of social media data in the academic environment, the session by the University of California will include an overview of the social media data landscape and the Crimson Hexagon product.

The three Vs of big data, volume, variety and velocity, are being explored in the “Hybrid Data Lake” being built by UKDA using the Universal Decimal Classification platform and expanding “topics” search while using big data management. Find out more about it as well as possible future applications.

Data protection

If you follow data protection issues, the panel on “Data protection: legal and ethical reviews” is for you, starting off with a presentation of the Administrative Data Research Network's (ADRN) Citizen's Panel, which look at public concerns about research using administrative data, the content of which is both personal and confidential. The ADRN was set up as part of the UK Government’s Big Data initiative as a UK-wide partnership between universities, government bodies, national statistics authorities and the wider research community.

The next ADRN presentation within this session will outline their application process and the role of the Approvals Panel in relation to ethical review. The aim is “to expand the discussion towards a broader reflection on the ethical dilemmas that administrative data pose”, as well as present some steps taken to address these difficulties.

NSD will then present the new EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), recently adopted at EU level, and explain how it will affect data collection, data use, data preservation and data sharing. If you have been wondering how the regulation will influence the possibilities for processing personal data for research purposes, or how personal data are defined, what conditions apply to an informed consent, or in which cases it is legal and ethical to conduct research without the consent of the data subjects, this presentation is for you.

The big picture

Wednesday 1 June will kick-off with a plenary entitled “Data for decision-makers: Old practice - new challenges” by Gudmund Hernes, the current president of the International Social Science Council and Norway’s former Minister of Education and Research 1990-95, and Minister of Health 1995-97.

The third day of the conference (2 June) will begin with a plenary - “Embracing the ‘Data Revolution’: Opportunities and Challenges for Research’ or ‘What you need to know about the data landscape to keep up to date”, by Matthew Woollard, Director of the UK Data Archive at the University of Essex and Director of the UK Data Service.

If you want to know more about the three European projects under the framework of the Horizon 2020 programme of the European Commission that CESSDA is involved in, one on big data (Big Data Europe - Empowering Communities with Data Technologies), another on - strengthening and widening the European infrastructure for social science data archives (CESSDA SaW) and a third on synergies for Europe's Research Infrastructures in the Social Sciences (SERISS), this panel is for you.  

"Don't Hate the Player, Hate the Game": Strategies for Discussing and Communicating Data Services” considers how libraries might strategically reconsider communications about data services.

Keep an eye on this blog for more news in the run-up to IASSIST2016.

Find out more on the IASSIST2016 website.

Spread the word on Twitter using #IASSIST16.

We are looking forward to seeing you in Bergen! 


A story by Eleanor Smith (CESSDA)

2016 IASSIST Fellowships

The IASSIST Fellows Committee are pleased to announce that we will be awarding an IASSIST Fellowship award for the 2016 conference to the following recipients:

Marijana Glavica - Systems Librarian, University of Zagreb, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, Croatia

'As a systems librarian I work with bibliographic data and manage library automation systems. I am also involved in designing library policies and procedures. As a subject specialist I provide information services to psychology professors and students, and I teach a course about information resources in psychology. In the last few years I started to work towards establishment of data archive and services for the social sciences in Croatia, an effort supported by SERSCIDA project in the past and currently by two ongoing projects - SEEDS and CESSDA-SaW.'

Dr Bhojaraju Gunjal - Head of Central Library, National Institute of Technology Rourkela, India

'I am serving as Head, Central Library (Deputy Librarian) of our institute library since August, 2014. In this capacity, I am responsible for management of the Biju Patnaik Central Library of this institute which employs 33 people including library staff, trainees, support staff and has an annual budget of over Rs. 6 Crores.

Our library manages institutional repositories using the DSpace and e-Prints tools with a number of new initiatives  under progress such as integrating ORCID with all our repositories, research data management, etc.  In this regard, programs like IASSIST will definitely help in managing our data repositories in much more effective way.

The library also provides special services by implementing state-of-the-art technologies in various initiatives such as Research data management, Liaison Program, Migration of library software to Open Source tools, Integration of Bio-metric with RFID, Mobile Apps including SMS/email alerts, QR Code, Knowledge Management aspects, Discovery Services, etc. for our library.

I will use this acquired knowledge through the Fellows program for the development of our library data repositories in developing, supporting and managing data infrastructures for our users and help other fellow colleagues in implementing the same in other libraries of India.'

Shima Moradisomehsaraei - Lecturer, Tehran Medical University & Azad University, Iran

'I teach information science and Information technology related courses to library , Medical Information system and Medical bioinformatic students. This means I teach students on how to use softwares to manage,correct and analysis data and how to design models and graphs. Teaching on the "indexing and retrieving" course we work on big data and linked data issues. I also teach on another related course "medical information systems" which I discusses big data and how it influences medical data of the whole society.'

Ya-Chi Lin, Data Specialist, Survey Research Data Archive, Academia Sinica, Taiwan

'Our institution, Survey Research Data Archive (SRDA) is an electronic library of the largest collection of digital data in social sciences in Taiwan. Part of my work entails is to promote SRDA and help SRDA members to use data to conduct secondary data analysis. I go to the campus and launch webinars to introduce the academic survey data and government survey data, and the enquiry service of SRDA to potential users.'

We would like to welcome our fellows into the IASSIST community and we're sure that they'll be made to feel at home by all IASSIST members at our forthcoming conference in Bergen, Norway.

Stuart Macdonald & Florio Arguillas (Chairs of IASSIST Fellows Committee)

IASSIST Fellows Program 2015-16

The IASSIST Fellows Program is pleased to announce that it is now accepting applications for financial support to attend the IASSIST 2016 conference in Bergen [http://iassist2016.org/] from data professionals who are developing, supporting and managing data infrastructures at their home institutions.

Please be aware that funding is not intended to cover the entire cost of attending the conference. The applicant's home institution must provide some level of financial support to supplement an IASSIST Fellow award. Strong preference will be given to first time participants and applicants from those countries currently with insufficient representation at IASSIST. Only fully completed applications will be considered. Applicants submitting a paper for the conference will be given priority consideration for funding.

You may apply for funding via this form<http://tinyurl.com/jsutx9z>. The deadline for applications is the 31st of January 2016.

For more information, to apply for funding or nominate a person for a Fellowship, please send an email to the Fellows Committee chairs, Florio Arguillas (foa2@cornell.edu) and Stuart Macdonald (stuart.macdonald@ed.ac.uk)

All best wishes
Stuart Macdonald & Florio Arguillas

  • IASSIST Quarterly

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