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IASSIST 2012

Become rich and famous: publish in the IQ!

These days many IASSIST members have received acceptance for their papers to the upcoming conference IASSIST 2013 in Cologne. There will be many interesting presentations at the conference. The conference presentation is your chance to present a project you are involved in, to air your argumentation for special areas, and in general to add to the IASSIST knowledge bank.

Projects are typically focused on support of social science research but the IASSIST related support now takes many forms with the developments of technology and applications. With your presentation at the conference you will have discussions and improvements of your work. After the conference you can in addition to the presentation at the conference reach a greater audience by publishing a revised paper in a coming issue of the IQ. Articles for the IASSIST Quarterly are always very welcome. They can be papers from IASSIST conferences or other conferences and workshops, from local presentations or papers especially written for the IQ.

If you are chairing a conference session you have the opportunity to become guest editor and to aggregate and integrate papers on a common subject for a special issue of the IQ.

Authors are very welcome to take a look at the instructions and article template on the IASSIST website. Authors and guest editors can also contact the editor via e-mail: kbr@sam.sdu.dk.

Karsten Boye Rasmussen     -    March 2013

Some reflections on research data confidentiality, privacy, and curation by Limor Peer

Some reflections on research data confidentiality, privacy, and curation

Limor Peer

Maintaining research subjects’ confidentiality is an essential feature of the scientific research enterprise. It also presents special challenges to the data curation process. Does the effort to open access to research data complicate these challenges?

A few reasons why I think it does: More data are discoverable and could be used to re-identify previously de-identified datasets; systems are increasingly interoperable, potentially bridging what may have been insular academic data with other data and information sources; growing pressure to open data may weaken some of the safeguards previously put in place; and some data are inherently identifiable

But these challenges should not diminish the scientific community’s firm commitment to both principles. It is possible, and desirable, for openness and privacy co-exist. It will not be simple to do, and here’s what we need to keep in mind:

First, let’s be clear about semantics. Open data and public data are not the same thing. As Melanie Chernoff observed, “All open data is publicly available. But not all publicly available data is open.” This distinction is important because what our community means by open (standards, format) may not be what policy-makers and the public at large mean (public access). Chernoff rightly points out that “whether data should be made publicly available is where privacy concerns come into play. Once it has been determined that government data should be made public, then it should be done so in an open format.” So, yes, we want as much data as possible to be public, but we most definitely want data to be open.

Another term that could be clarified is usefulness. In the academic context, we often think of data re-use by other scholars, in the service of advancing science. But what if the individuals from whom the data were collected are the ones who want to make use of it? It’s entirely conceivable that the people formerly known as “research subjects” begin demanding access to, and control over, their own personal data as they become more accustomed to that in other contexts. This will require some fresh ideas about regulation and some rethinking of the concept of informed consent (see, for example, the work of John Wilbanks, NIH, and the National Cancer Institute on this front). The academic community is going to have to confront this issue.

Precisely because terms are confusing and often vaguely defined, we should use them carefully. It’s tempting to pit one term against the other, e.g., usefulness vs. privacy, but it may not be productive. The tension between privacy and openness or transparency does not mean that we have to choose one over the other. As Felix Wu says, “there is nothing inherently contradictory about hiding one piece of information while revealing another, so long as the information we want to hide is different from the information we want to disclose.” The complex reality is that we have to weigh them carefully and make context-based decisions.

I think the IASSIST community is in a position to lead on this front, as it is intimately familiar with issues of disclosure risk. Just last spring, the 2012 IASSIST conference included a panel on confidentiality, privacy and security. IASSIST has a special interest group on Human Subjects Review Committees and Privacy and Confidentiality in Research. Various IASSIST members have been involved with heroic efforts to create solutions (e.g., via the DDI Alliance, UKDA and ICPSR protocols) and educate about the issue (e.g., ICPSR webinar , ICPSR summer course, and MANTRA module). A recent panel at the International Data Curation Conference in Amsterdam showcased IASSIST members’ strategies for dealing with this issue (see my reflections about the panel).

It might be the case that STEM is leading the push for open data, but these disciplines are increasingly confronted with problems of re-identification, while the private sector is increasingly being scrutinized for its practices (see this on “data hops”). The social (and, of course, medical) sciences have a well-developed regulatory framework around the issue of research ethics that many of us have been steeped in. Government agencies have their own approaches and standards (see recent report by the U.S. Government Accountability office). IASSIST can provide a bridge; we have the opportunity to help define the conversation and offer some solutions.

2012 Report from the Interest Group on Human Subjects Review Committees and Privacy and Confidentiality in Research

Topic:
For those of you exploring issues of human subjects, privacy and confidentiality, this group may be of interest.  In the coming year we hope to put together some resources and guides for those working with confidential data or human subjects related work.  Please contact libbie@ucla.edu if you are "interested"!

Interest Group on Human Subjects Review Committees and Privacy and Confidentiality in Research
This group will focus on issues related to conducting research using human subjects in the social sciences. Particular areas of focus and discussion will include, but are not limited to the following:
· The role and function of the human subjects review board as social science research enters the digital age.
· The human subject review influences and effects on data management, dissemination, curation and preservation practices.
· Issues related to protection of human subjects laws and policies established in IASSIST member countries.
· Issues related to privacy and confidentiality of human subjects in research.
We will seek out and take advantage of opportunities for education, outreach and advocacy on subjects related to human subjects review committees, including proposing sessions with rele vant presentations at IASSIST conferences and creating web based resources and tools for members.
2011-2012 Chair: Libbie Stephenson, libbie@ucla.edu

2011-2012 report:  The Interest group has been largely inactive this past year; however two efforts are worthy of mention.  In the U.S. the Department of Health and Human Services circulated an Advanced Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (ANPRM): Human Subjects Research and Reducing Burden, Delay and Ambiguity for Investigators.  The research community was invited to comment.  Given time constraints it was decided that IASSIST (via email discussion with IASSIST AC members) would not make a formal statement; however individual members of IASSIST were encouraged to submit comments.  A link to the details on this effort is here: http://www.hhs.gov/ohrp/humansubjects/anprm2011page.html and contains directions to individual comments. The Interest Group would like to thank George Alter (DataPASS, ICPSR) Micah Altman (MIT) and Joann Juhnke for their support and collaboration on responses to this ANPRM.

A second activity involved a U.S. Office of Science and Technology Request for Information: Public Access to Digital Data Resulting from Federally Funded Scientific Research.  This RFI was broad in scope however, several of the questions were of a human subjects nature and again, IASSIST members were encouraged to submit responses and a number did so. Details on the RFI can be found here: https://www.federalregister.gov/articles/2011/12/23/2011-32947/request-for-information-public-access-to-digital-data-resulting-from-federally-funded-scientific.  The Interest Group would like to thank George Alter (DataPASS, ICPSR) Micah Altman (MIT) for their support and collaboration on responses to this RFI.

The Interest Group would like to continue for another year and unless there is someone else who would like to become Chair, the current Chair is willing to continue in this role.  The Interest Group would welcome suggestions for further activities from the AC if any are forthcoming.

Respectfully submitted,
Libbie Stephenson, Chair

iassist 2012 conference song

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My thanks to Vince Gray, Lisa Neidert, and Melanie Wright for help with the lyrics, Melanie for the great guitar accompaniment, and Melanie, Vince, and Kate McNeill for singing along (and thereby drowning out the sound of what passes for my singing voice :)

(Sung, sort of, to the tune of "America the beautiful")

It's 2012 in Washington,
We met for IASSIST;
Unfortunately we're all done,
But memories persist -
     IASSIST oh IASSIST,
     We look forward to you;
     The meetings and the people
     Give us so much to do.

Meetings started Sunday
And all day Monday too;
Workshops took up Tuesday -
Evening reception too.
     Wednesday's plenary began
     Things in a proper way;
     Talks on research management,
     Pecha kuchas filled the day.

Thursday was a special day
Will lots of talks to view;
The boat cruise on a special night -
Eight presidents hove to.
     Wordles, wordles everywhere,
     And metadata too;
     Captain Carrot's data cows
     Make data folks say "mooooo".

On Friday things start winding down -
We all start going home.
The song starts getting written down -
The banner finds a new home.
     IASSISTers, please persist;
     We'll meet you all next year
     In 2013 in Cologne,
     We'll drink the better beer!

IASSIST 2012 - Registration Now Open

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We are pleased to announce that registration is now open for the IASSIST 2012 Conference!

IASSIST 2012 conference site: http://www.iassist2012.org/index.html

Conference Theme: Data Science for a Connected World: Unlocking and Harnessing the Power of Information

Dates: June 4th – 8th, Washington D.C. USA.

Register before May 1st to take advantage of special conference and workshops rates. Fees and other details are available at: http://www.iassist2012.org/indexfolder/Register/index.php

The theme “Data Science for a Connected World: Unlocking and Harnessing the Power of Information” reflects the growing desire of research communities, government agencies and other organizations to build connections and benefit from the better use of data through practicing good management, dissemination and preservation techniques.

Information about the papers, panels, and other events can be found at: http://www.iassist2012.org/indexfolder/program

The theme for IASSIST 2012 is also reflective of this year's host city and nation's capital: Washington, DC. The seat of many US government agencies, as well as major international institutions like the World Bank and IMF, Washington is an ideal backdrop for discussing the importance of data sharing and management or international best practices. The city is also known for its vibrant nightlife, emerging cultural scene, historical sites, and free museums (check out post- conference tours options!).

We look forward to welcoming you to Washington DC for the IASSIST 2012 Conference.

IASSIST Fellows application now closed

The application for IASSIST Fellows is now closed. Over 40 applications from 23 different countries have been received with the following number of applications by region:

  • 23 Latin America
  • 12 Africa
  • 6 Asia

The Fellows Committee is now working to evaluate the applications and will make the decisions in the following weeks. Good luck to all participants.

IASSIST 2012 Fellows Program

The IASSIST Fellows Program is now accepting applications for financial support to attend the IASSIST 2012 conference in Washington [http://www.iassist2012.org/], from data professionals from countries with emerging economies who are developing and managing data infrastructures at their home institutions.

Please be aware that funding is not intended to cover the entire cost of attending the conference. The applicant’s home institution must provide some level of financial support to supplement the IASSIST Fellow award. Strong preference will be given to first time participants, and applicants from Latin-American countries. Only fully completed applications will be accepted. Applicants submitting a paper for the conference will be given priority consideration for funding.

 You may apply for funding via this form.

For more information, to apply for funding or nominate a person for a Fellowship, please send an email to the Fellows Committee chair, Luis Martínez-Uribe.

 

Call for Workshops

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Don't forget to propose that extra special workshop for IASSIST 2012. Deadline is Jan 16. You can also propose Pecha Kuchas, posters, and roundtable discussions until Jan 16.

Call for Workshops

Data Science for a Connected World: Unlocking and Harnessing the Power of Information

The 38th International Association for Social Science Information Services and Technology (IASSIST) annual conference will be hosted by NORC at the University of Chicago and will be held at the George Washington University in Washington DC, June 4 - 8, 2012.

The theme of this year's conferences is Data Science for a Connected World: Unlocking and Harnessing the Power of Information. This theme reflects the growing desire of research communities, government agencies and other organizations to build connections and benefit from the better use of data through practicing good management, dissemination and preservation techniques. Submissions are encouraged that offer improvements for creating, documenting, submitting, describing, disseminating, and preserving scientific research data.

Workshops details:
The conference committee seeks workshops that highlight this year’s theme Data Science for a Connected World: Unlocking and Harnessing the Power of Information.  Below is a sample of possible workshop topics that may be considered:

  • Innovative/disruptive technologies for data management and preservation
  • Infrastructures, tools and resources for data production and research
  • Linked data: opportunities and challenges
  • Metadata standards enhancing the utility of data
  • Challenges and concerns with inter-agency / intra-governmental data sharing
  • Privacy, confidentiality and regulation issues around sensitive data
  • Roles, responsibilities, and relationships in supporting data
  • Facilitating data exchange and sharing across boundaries
  • Data and statistical literacy
  • Data management plans and funding agency requirements
  • Norms and cultures of data in the sciences, social sciences and the humanities
  • Collaboration on research data infrastructure across domains and communities
  • Addressing the digital/statistical divide and the need for trans-national outreach
  • Citation of research data and persistent identifiers
  • The evolving data librarian profession

Successful workshop proposals will blend lecture and active learning techniques.  The conference planning committee will provide the necessary classroom space and computing supplies for all workshops.  For previous examples of IASSIST workshops, please see our 2010 workshops and our 2011 workshops. Workshops can be a half-day or full-day in length.

Procedure: Please submit the proposed title and an abstract of no longer than 200 words to Lynda Kellam (lmkellam@uncg.edu). With your submission please include a preliminary list of requirements including:

  • computer Lab OR classroom
  • software and hardware requirements
  • any additional expected requirements

Deadline for submissionJanuary 16, 2012
Notification of acceptance: March 2, 2012

Please contact Lynda Kellam, IASSIST workshop Coordinator, if you have any questions regarding workshop submissions at lmkellam@uncg.edu

IASSIST is an international organization of professionals working in and with information technology and data services to support research and teaching in the social sciences.  Typical workplaces include data archives/libraries, statistical agencies, research centers, libraries, academic departments, government departments, and non‐profit organizations.  Visit iassistdata.org  for further information.

IASSIST 2012
June 4 - 8, 2012
Washington DC, USA

-IASSIST 2012 Program Chairs: Jake Carlson, Pascal Heus and Oliver Watteler

IASSIST 2012 - Call for Workshops

Topic:

 

The Call for Papers for IASSIST 2012 is closed, but proposals for Workshops are now being accepted.  The Call for Workshops is listed below:

 

Call for Workshops

Data Science for a Connected World:
Unlocking and Harnessing the Power
of Information

The 38th International Association for Social Science Information Services and Technology (IASSIST) annual conference will be hosted by NORC at the University of Chicago and will be held at the George Washington University in Washington DC, June 4 - 8, 2012. 

The theme of this year's conferences is Data Science for a Connected World: Unlocking and Harnessing the Power of Information. This theme reflects the growing desire of research communities, government agencies and other organizations to build connections and benefit from the better use of data through practicing good management, dissemination and preservation techniques. Submissions are encouraged that offer improvements for creating, documenting, submitting, describing, disseminating, and preserving scientific research data. 

Workshops details:
The conference committee seeks workshops that highlight this year’s theme Data Science for a Connected World: Unlocking and Harnessing the Power of Information.  Below is a sample of possible workshop topics that may be considered: 

  • Innovative/disruptive technologies for data management and preservation
  • Infrastructures, tools and resources for data production and research
  • Linked data: opportunities and challenges
  • Metadata standards enhancing the utility of data
  • Challenges and concerns with inter-agency / intra-governmental data sharing
  • Privacy, confidentiality and regulation issues around sensitive data
  • Roles, responsibilities, and relationships in supporting data
  • Facilitating data exchange and sharing across boundaries
  • Data and statistical literacy
  • Data management plans and funding agency requirements
  • Norms and cultures of data in the sciences, social sciences and the humanities
  • Collaboration on research data infrastructure across domains and communities
  • Addressing the digital/statistical divide and the need for trans-national outreach
  • Citation of research data and persistent identifiers
  • The evolving data librarian profession

Successful workshop proposals will blend lecture and active learning techniques.  The conference planning committee will provide the necessary classroom space and computing supplies for all workshops.  For previous examples of IASSIST workshops, please see our 2010 workshops and our 2011 workshops. Workshops can be a half-day or full-day in length.

Procedure: Please submit the proposed title and an abstract of no longer than 200 words to Lynda Kellam (lmkellam@uncg.edu). With your submission please include a preliminary list of requirements including:

  • computer Lab OR classroom
  • software and hardware requirements
  • any additional expected requirements

Deadline for submissionJanuary 16, 2012
Notification of acceptance: March 2, 2012

Please contact Lynda Kellam, IASSIST workshop Coordinator, if you have any questions regarding workshop submissions at lmkellam@uncg.edu

IASSIST is an international organization of professionals working in and with information technology and data services to support research and teaching in the social sciences.  Typical workplaces include data archives/libraries, statistical agencies, research centers, libraries, academic departments, government departments, and non‐profit organizations.  Visit iassistdata.org  for further information. 

IASSIST 2012
June 4 - 8, 2012
Washington DC, USA

-IASSIST 2012 Program Chairs: Jake Carlson, Pascal Heus and Oliver Watteler

Reminder - Submit your paper and panel proposals to IASSIST 2012

Topic:

Just a reminder that the deadline to submit an individual paper or a panel session to IASSIST 2012 is Friday December 9th.  The Submission Form can be found at: http://www.iassist2012.org/index.php/CPMS/submissions2012.html  

Call for Papers

Data Science for a Connected World: Unlocking and Harnessing the Power of Information

The theme of this year's conference is Data Science for a Connected World: Unlocking and Harnessing the Power of Information. This theme reflects the growing desire of research communities, government agencies and other organizations to build connections and benefit from the better use of data through practicing good management, dissemination and preservation techniques.

The theme is intended to stimulate discussions on building connections across all scholarly disciplines, governments, organizations, and individuals who are engaged in working with data.  IASSIST as a professional organization has a long history of bringing together those who provide information technology and data services to support research and teaching in the social sciences.  What can we as data professionals with shared interests and concerns learn from others going forward and what can they learn from us?  How can data professionals of all kinds build the connections that will be needed to address shared concerns and leverage strengths to better manage, share, curate and preserve data?

We welcome submissions on the theme outlined above, and encourage conference participants to propose papers and sessions that would be of interest to a diverse audience. Any paper related to the conference theme will be considered; below is a sample of possible topics

Topics:

  • Innovative/disruptive technologies for data management and preservation
  • Infrastructures, tools and resources for data production and research
  • Linked data: opportunities and challenges
  • Metadata standards enhancing the utility of data
  • Challenges and concerns with inter-agency / intra-governmental data sharing
  • Privacy, confidentiality and regulation issues around sensitive data
  • Roles, responsibilities, and relationships in supporting data
  • Facilitating data exchange and sharing across boundaries
  • Data and statistical literacy
  • Data management plans and funding agency requirements
  • Norms and cultures of data in the sciences, social sciences and the humanities
  • Collaboration on research data infrastructure across domains and communities
  • Addressing the digital/statistical divide and the need for trans-national outreach

Papers will be selected from a wide range of subjects to ensure a broad balance of topics.

The Program Committee welcomes proposals for:
Individual presentations (typically 15-20 minutes)
Complete sessions, which could take a variety of formats (e.g. a set of three to four individual presentations on a theme, a discussion panel, a discussion with the audience, etc.)
Posters/demonstrations for the poster session
Pecha Kucha (a presentation of 20 slides shown for 20 seconds each, heavy emphasis on visual content) http://www.wired.com/techbiz/media/magazine/15-09/st_pechakucha
Round table discussions (as these are likely to have limited spaces, an explanation of how the discussion will be shared with the wider group should form part of the proposal).
[Note: A separate call for workshops is forthcoming].

Session formats are not limited to the ideas above and session organizers are welcome to suggest other formats.

Proposals for complete sessions should list the organizer or moderator and possible participants; the session organizer will be responsible for securing both session participants and a chair.

All submissions should include the proposed title and an abstract no longer than 200 words (note: longer abstracts will be returned to be shortened before being considered).  Abstracts submitted for complete sessions should provide titles and a brief description for each of the individual presentations.  Abstracts for complete session proposals should be no longer than 300 words if information about individual presentations are needed. 

Please note that all presenters are required to register and pay the registration fee for the conference; registration for individual days will be available.

  • Deadline for submission of individual presentations and sessions: 9 December 2011.
  • Deadline for submission of posters, Pecha Kucha sessions and round table discussions: 16 January 2012.
  • Notification of acceptance for individual presentations and sessions: 10 February 2012.
  • Notification of acceptance for posters, Pecha Kucha sessions and round table discussions: 2 March 2012.

We would want to receive confirmation of acceptance from those we invite to present by two weeks after notification.

  • IASSIST Quarterly

    Publications Special issue: A pioneer data librarian
    Welcome to the special volume of the IASSIST Quarterly (IQ (37):1-4, 2013). This special issue started as exchange of ideas between Libbie Stephenson and Margaret Adams to collect

    more...

  • Resources

    Resources

    A space for IASSIST members to share professional resources useful to them in their daily work. Also the IASSIST Jobs Repository for an archive of data-related position descriptions. more...

  • community

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    Find out what IASSISTers are doing in the field and explore other avenues of presentation, communication and discussion via social networking and related online social spaces. more...