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IASSIST 2012 - Call for Papers

Topic:

The Call for Papers for IASSIST 2012 is below.  The conference website is still under development, but we thought it important to disseminate the call for papers to IASSIST membership now.  The Call will be reposted and further disseminated once the conference website is up and running.  Thanks.

 

2012 Conference Program Chairs

-Pascal, Oliver and Jake   

 

===========================

Data Science for a Connected World: Unlocking and Harnessing the Power of Information

The 38th International Association for Social Science Information Services

and Technology (IASSIST) annual conference will be held in Washington DC, June 4 - 8, 2012.

 

The theme of this year's conference is Data Science for a Connected World: Unlocking and Harnessing the Power of Information. This theme reflects the growing desire of research communities, government agencies and other organizations to build connections and benefit from the better use of data through practicing good management, dissemination and preservation techniques.

The theme is intended to stimulate discussions on building connections across all scholarly disciplines, governments, organizations, and individuals who are engaged in working with data.  IASSIST as a professional organization has a long history of bringing together those who provide information technology and data services to support research and teaching in the social sciences.  What can we as data professionals with shared interests and concerns learn from others going forward and what can they learn from us?  How can data professionals of all kinds build the connections that will be needed to address shared concerns and leverage strengths to better manage, share, curate and preserve data? 

We welcome submissions on the theme outlined above, and encourage conference participants to propose papers and sessions that would be of interest to a diverse audience. Any paper related to the conference theme will be considered; below is a sample of possible topics

Topics:

  • Innovative/disruptive technologies for data management and preservation
  • Infrastructures, tools and resources for data production and research
  • Linked data: opportunities and challenges
  • Metadata standards enhancing the utility of data
  • Challenges and concerns with inter-agency / intra-governmental data sharing
  • Privacy, confidentiality and regulation issues around sensitive data
  • Roles, responsibilities, and relationships in supporting data
  • Facilitating data exchange and sharing across boundaries
  • Data and statistical literacy
  • Data management plans and funding agency requirements
  • Norms and cultures of data in the sciences, social sciences and the humanities
  • Collaboration on research data infrastructure across domains and communities
  • Addressing the digital/statistical divide and the need for trans-national outreach

Papers will be selected from a wide range of subjects to ensure a broad balance of topics.

  • The Program Committee welcomes proposals for:
  • Individual presentations (typically 15-20 minutes)
  • Complete sessions, which could take a variety of formats (e.g. a set of three to four individual presentations on a theme, a discussion panel, a discussion with the audience, etc.)
  • Posters/demonstrations for the poster session
  • Pecha Kucha (a presentation of 20 slides shown for 20 seconds each, heavy emphasis on visual content) http://www.wired.com/techbiz/media/magazine/15-09/st_pechakucha
  • Round table discussions (as these are likely to have limited spaces, an explanation of how the discussion will be shared with the wider group should form part of the proposal).
  • [Note: A separate call for workshops is forthcoming].


Session formats are not limited to the ideas above and session organizers are welcome to suggest other formats.

Proposals for complete sessions should list the organizer or moderator and possible participants; the session organizer will be responsible for securing both session participants and a chair.

All submissions should include the proposed title and an abstract no longer than 200 words (note: longer abstracts will be returned to be shortened before being considered).  Abstracts submitted for complete sessions should provide titles and a brief description for each of the individual presentations.  Abstracts for complete session proposals should be no longer than 300 words if information about individual presentations are needed.  

Please note that all presenters are required to register and pay the registration fee for the conference; registration for individual days will be available.

Deadline for submission of individual presentations and sessions: 5 December 2011.

Deadline for submission of posters, Pecha Kucha sessions and round table discussions: 16 January 2012.

Notification of acceptance for individual presentations and sessions: 3 February 2012.

Notification of acceptance for posters, Pecha Kucha sessions and round table discussions: 24 February 2012.

Data can be cool

As I prepare to leave Guelph there are lots of things I will miss - but what I will maybe miss most is the Data Resource Centre and the creative people who work there.   If you link to the picasa album below you will see some awesome posters they have made to showcase services and bring people into the world of Data and GIS. The images on some of the posters are really powerful....

posters on picasa

DDI/Java developer @ Metadata Technology

Topic:

Metadata Technology North America is looking for full-time Java developers with strong background in XML and web service technologies. We are seeking entry level programmers as well as a more senior individual that can potentially operate as both a Java developer and project manager. Individuals must be able to work independently and posses the ability to adapt existing knowledge to new applications and technologies.

Our company focus is on providing solutions for the management of socio-economic and health statistical data and metadata, leveraging the Data Documentation Initiative (DDI), the Statistical Data and Metadata Exchange (SDMX), and related XML specifications.

Candidates must have the following qualifications:
- Strong Java development in a client / server environment
- Creative, quick learner, independent
- Solid expertise with XML and related technologies (XSL, XPath/XQuery, XSchema, SOAP, etc.)
- Development web service based J2EE applications
- Experience with the Eclipse Integrated Development Environment, including JUnit, Subversion, and JavaDocs

Familiarity with the following is desired but not required:
- Eclipse RCP framework
- Google Web Toolkit
- Spring framework
- Relational and/or native XML databases
- Apache XMLBeans
- Statistical data and software
- DDI, SDMX and related specifications
- Pentaho or similar BI/ETL platform

Positions are local to Knoxville, TN or Washington, DC metropolitan area.

Interested candidates should submit resume and letter of motivation to mtna@metadatatechnology.com.

Metadata Technology North America is committed to the principles of equal employment opportunity and to making employment decisions based on merit. We are committed to complying with Federal, State and local laws providing equal employment opportunities, as well as all laws related to terms and conditions of employment. The company desires to keep a work environment free of sexual harassment or discrimination based on race, religion, ethnicity, national origin, sexual orientation, physical or mental disability, marital status, age or any other status protected by Federal, State or local laws.

ANES Announcement: : Deadlines for the ANES 2010-2012 EGSS Online Commons Proposals

The American National Election Studies are continuing to accept proposals for the ANES 2010-2012 Evaluations of Government and Society Study. The deadline to submit proposals for EGSS 4 is 3:00p.m. EDT, August 30, 2011. The deadline for members of the Online Commons community to comment on proposals is September 8, 2011. The deadline for revisions to proposals is at 3:00p.m. EDT on September 14, 2011. For additional information about how to submit a proposal, please visit: http://www.electionstudies.org/

Proposals may be submitted through the ANES Online Commons. The following describes the goals of this study and proposal process.

About The 2010-2012 Evaluations of Government and Society Study

The overarching theme of the surveys is citizen attitudes about government and society. These Internet surveys represent the most cost-effective way for the ANES user community to gauge political perceptions during one of the most momentous periods in American history. Aside from the historic nature of the current administration and the almost unprecedented economic crisis facing the country, we believe it is imperative that researchers assess attitudes about politics and society in the period leading up to the 2012 national elections. Potential topics include: attitudes about the performance of the Obama administration on the major issues of the day, evaluations of Congress and the Supreme Court, identification with and attitudes about the major political parties, and levels of interest in and engagement with national politics. This is primarily because these perceptions are unmistakably correlated with both presidential vote choice and levels of political participation. We intend to measure each of these topics at multiple points throughout the two-year period preceding the

2012 elections. In addition to these subjects, we envision that each of these surveys would explore a particular aspect of these political perceptions.

This Study includes five rolling cross-section surveys that will allow us the opportunity to pilot new items for possible inclusion on the 2012 time series. Proposals for the first three surveys of the study were accepted earlier this year. The first survey of the study was conducted in October 2010; the second survey was conducted in the Spring of 2011. The third survey will be in the field later this year. We are currently accepting proposals for the final two surveys of the study. The fourth survey will be conducted in early 2012 and the final survey will be in the field in the middle of 2012. For the timelines and deadlines for the remaining surveys, please see http://electionstudies.org/studypages/2010_2012EGSS/2010_2012EGSScalendar.htm

By offering multiple opportunities for the user community to place their items on one or more surveys, we are providing the capacity to survey on a diverse set of topics that are relevant to a wide set of research communities. Lastly, the flexibility of these surveys as to both content and timing will allow the ANES to respond promptly to emerging political issues in this volatile period in our country's history.

About the Online Commons

The design of the questionnaires for The 2010-2012 Evaluations of Government and Society Study will evolve from proposals and comments submitted to the Online Commons (OC). The OC is an online system designed to promote communication among scholars and to yield innovative proposals about the most effective ways to measure electorally-relevant concepts and relationships. The goal of the OC is to improve the quality and scientific value of ANES data collections, to encourage the submission of new ideas, and to make such experiences more beneficial to and enjoyable for investigators. In the last study cycle, more than 700 scholars sent over 200 proposals through the Online Commons.

Proposals for the inclusion of questions must include clear theoretical and empirical rationales. All proposals must also clearly state how the questions will increase the value of the respective studies. In particular, proposed questions must have the potential to help scholars understand the causes and/or consequences of turnout or candidate choice.

For more information about the criteria that will be used to evaluate proposals, please see http://www.electionstudies.org/studypages/2010_2012EGSS/2010_2012EGSScriteria.htm

For additional information on how to submit a proposal, please see http://www.electionstudies.org/onlinecommons/proposalsubmit.htm

ANES Announcement: The ANES 2012 Time Series Study

On June 30, 2011, the American National Election Studies (ANES) began accepting proposals for questions to include on the ANES 2012 Time Series Study.  Proposals may be submitted through the ANES Online Commons. The following describes the goals of this study and the opportunity to include questions on it.

About The ANES 2012 Time Series Study

The ANES’s core mission is to promote cutting-edge and broadly-collaborative research on American national elections. The heart of the ANES is its presidential year time series surveys. The time series legacy is well known, serving as a model for election studies around the world and having generated thousands of publications. Every four years, a large representative sample of American adults has been interviewed on two occasions, first between Labor Day and Election Day, and again between Election Day and the onset of the winter holidays. The two face-to-face interviews will last approximately one hour each in 2012. Pre-election interviews focus on candidate preferences and anticipated vote choice; an array of possible predictors of candidate preferences, turnout, citizen engagement; and an array of indicators of cognitive and behavioral engagement in the information flow of the campaign. Post-election interviews measures a variety of behavioral experiences people might have had throughout the campaign (e.g., turnout, mobilization efforts), plus additional posited predictors of candidate preferences, turnout, and citizen engagement.

Some of the questions asked during these interviews are categorized as standard (also known as core) items, meaning that they have been asked regularly over the years.  These questions are scheduled to appear on subsequent editions of the ANES Time Series in order to permit comparisons across elections.  The purpose of categorizing items as standard is to assure scholars who conduct longitudinal analyses that they can continue to depend on ANES to include variables that have been shown to perform well in the past.

Although recognizing the importance of continuity, ANES has also sought to develop the time series in innovative ways. The non-standard component of each questionnaire has routinely focused on matters of interest to the current election cycle. These items are often selected from an "ANES Question Inventory," which includes the standard questions and questions that have been asked in past ANES surveys but are not part of the standard battery of questions.  Researchers can access the question inventory at:

ftp://ftp.electionstudies.org/ftp/anes/OC/CoreUtility/ALT2010core.htm

The non-standard content of questionnaires has varied over the years. For example, candidate positions on issues of government policy are recognized as predictors of candidate preferences, but two one-hour interviews do not permit measuring positions on all of the many issues enjoying government attention at any one time in history. So from year to year, different choices have been made about which issues to include in the questionnaire.

As in the past, ANES will continue to emphasize best practices in sample design, respondent recruitment, and interviewing.  As always, we aim to provide top-quality service in many respects, including: (1) the careful and extensive planning that must be done before the field work begins, (2) the hard work that will be done by interviewers, supervisors, and study managers during data collection to monitor productivity and make adjustments in strategy to maximize the quality of the final product, and (3) the extensive data processing efforts (including integration of an extensive contextual data file) that will be required to assemble and document the final data set.

 

About the Online Commons

Content for the ANES 2012 Time Series Study will primarily evolve from two sources:  previous ANES Time Series questionnaires and new proposals received via the ANES Online Commons (OC).  The OC is an Internet-based system designed to promote communication among scholars and to yield innovative proposals about the most effective ways to measure electorally-relevant concepts and relationships. The goal of the OC is to improve the quality and scientific value of ANES data collections, to encourage the submission of new ideas, and to make such experiences more beneficial to and enjoyable for investigators. In the last study cycle, more than 700 scholars sent over 200 proposals through the OC.

Proposals for the inclusion of questions must include clear theoretical and empirical rationales. All proposals must also clearly state how the questions will increase the value of the respective studies. In particular, proposed questions must have the potential to help scholars understand the causes and/or consequences of turnout or candidate choice.

The ANES Online Commons will accept proposals until 3:00pm Eastern Time on August 30, 2011. The deadline for members of the Online Commons community to comment on proposals is September 8, 2011. The deadline for revisions to proposals is at 3:00pm Eastern Time on September 14, 2011.

For additional information about how to submit a proposal, please visit:

http://www.electionstudies.org/

 

Proposal Evaluation Criteria

The following criteria will guide the PIs and the ANES Board in evaluating proposals made through the Online Commons. We strongly encourage anyone who is considering making a proposal to read the following carefully.

1. Problem-Relevant. Are the theoretical motivations, proposed concepts and survey items relevant to ongoing controversies among researchers? How will the data that the proposers expect to observe advance the debate?

What specific analyses of the data will be performed? What might these analyses reveal? How would these findings be relevant to specific questions or controversies?

2. Suitability to ANES. The primary mission of the ANES is to advance our understanding of voter choice and electoral participation. Ceteris paribus, concepts and instrumentation that are relevant to our understanding of these phenomena will be considered more favorably than items tapping other facets of politics, public opinion, American culture or society.

3. Building on Solid Theoretical Footing. Does the proposed instrumentation follow from a plausible theory of political behavior?

4. Demonstrated Validity and Reliability of Proposed Items. Proposed items should be accompanied by evidence demonstrating their validity and reliability. Validity has various facets: e.g., construct validity, concurrent validity, discriminant validity and predictive validity. Any assessment of predictive validity should keep in mind criterion 2, above.

Reliability can be demonstrated in various ways; one example is test-retest reliability. We understand that proposals for novel concepts and/or instrumentation will almost always lack empirical evidence demonstrating validity and/or reliability. Proposals for truly "novel" instrumentation might be best suited for the series of smaller, cross-sectional studies ANES will field in the period 2010 through the summer of 2012; as a general matter, we are highly unlikely to field untested instrumentation on the Fall 2012 pre-election and post-election surveys.

5. Breadth of Relevance and Generalizability. Will the research that results from the proposed instrumentation be useful to many scholars?

Given the broad usage of ANES data, we may be unable to accommodate requests to include items that are relevant for one -or only a few- hypothesis tests. Ceteris paribus, items that are potentially relevant for a wide range of analyses will be considered more favorably than items that would seem to have less applicability.

When the 2012 questionnaires are designed, the status of the standard questions will be central considerations. Standard questions do not have an infinite shelf life -- Science advances and new insights can reveal more effective ways of asking important questions or can show that some questions do not in fact meet the requirements of remaining a standard question.  However, proposed changes made to standard questions will be scrutinized with recognition of the value of continuity over time.  While we will welcome proposals to change standard questions, the burden of proof required for making such changes will be high. We will take most seriously arguments that are backed by concrete evidence and strong theory.

All proposals that include a change to a particular question (standard or non-standard) should name the specific question that would be altered and provide a full explanation as to why the ANES user community will benefit by such a change.

Tools To Assist Your Proposal Development

As previously mentioned, researchers can access the ANES Question Inventory at:

ftp://ftp.electionstudies.org/ftp/anes/OC/CoreUtility/ALT2010core.htm

This Inventory provides the list of standard and non-standard questions that have been part of the Time Series, and includes frequencies for the most recent studies.

We have also created a second resource to review questions that have been asked previously.  The ANES Time Series Codebook Search utility searches existing codebooks from studies in the ANES Time Series.   You can access the utility at http://ftp.nes.isr.umich.edu/backup/searchhelp.htm  

(Please note that there are some limitations to the utility that are documented on the search help page, the link to that page is at the top of the utility page.)

We hope that you will find these tools useful as you prepare your proposals.

The opportunity to submit proposals is open to anyone who wants to make a constructive contribution to the development of the ANES 2012 Time Series Study. Feel free to pass this invitation along to anyone (e.g., your colleagues and students) who you think might be interested. We hope to hear from you.

For additional resources and information on how to submit a proposal, please visit http://www.electionstudies.org/onlinecommons/

 

Darrell Donakowski

Director of Studies

American National Election Studies (ANES)

10 significant visualisation developments

Interesting collection of visualization developments:

 

10 significant visualisation developments: January to June 2011 Visualising Data (July 7th, 2011)

Videos from the IASSIST 2011 Plenaries

Hello - for those who were not able to attend IASSIST 2011 and for those asking to have access to video presentations, the two videos of the Plenaries from IASSIST 2011 are now available for viewing:

Chuck Humphrey - Data Library Coordinator, University of Alberta
Research Data Infrastructure: Are the Social Sciences on Main Street or a Side Road?

Chuck Humphrey is passionate about data and has been examining research data infrastructure with a global perspective. His talk will locate the social sciences in the broader E-science picture and give us a glimpse of the future.

Plenary II 

Date: Thursday, June 02 

Video   

 

Andrea Reimer - Councillor, City of Vancouver
Open Data in Vancouver: The Inspiration and the Vision


Andrea Reimer is a Councillor for the city of Vancouver and is a passionate advocate for democracy and civic engagement. The City of Vancouver has led the way with the adoption of a resolution in May [2009] that endorsed open and accessible data, open standards, and open source software. Ms Reimer has been heavily involved in this initiative and will share her passion with IASSIST.

Plenary III 

Date: Friday, June 03 

Video

 

The QuickTime .mov files are available in a variety of viewing formats: via desktops, iPhone, iPod, iPad, smartphones.

We have had various and mixed reports on streaming successes. These are large Video files (each over an Hour in length), so patience is required.


IASSIST SIGDC Meeting Held in Vancouver

The IASSIST Special Interest Group on Data Citation (SIGDC) met in Vancouver on Wednesday, June 1, with 15 people in attendance. The group discussed ways in which IASSIST members could influence data citation standards and behavior. Suggestions were made to:

  • Inventory the resources that the SIG maintains and knows about
  • Create a set of simple slides to share with faculty and students; these might include guidelines on citation format with examples but would not endorse a certain format
  • Create posters on data citation to hang in prominent places
  • Contact bibliographic software companies to make sure they include data as a specific resource type
  • Contact style guides – APA, Chicago, MLA – to ensure that they are providing appropriate citations for data and including DOIs
  • Create a set of Web pages on this topic on the IASSIST site
  • Contact Google Scholar with a list of issues related to data

Joachim Wackerow presented information on ways to make DOIs more machine-actionable. He pointed out that CrossRef has a new project to provide for HTTP negotiation. This would permit the DOI to link to rich structured metadata like DDI in addition to a human-readable metadata record.

Updated Guide on Data Citation Available

Topic:

The Australian National Data Service has updated its Guide on Data Citation.

  • IASSIST Quarterly

    Publications Special issue: A pioneer data librarian
    Welcome to the special volume of the IASSIST Quarterly (IQ (37):1-4, 2013). This special issue started as exchange of ideas between Libbie Stephenson and Margaret Adams to collect

    more...

  • Resources

    Resources

    A space for IASSIST members to share professional resources useful to them in their daily work. Also the IASSIST Jobs Repository for an archive of data-related position descriptions. more...

  • community

    • LinkedIn
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    Find out what IASSISTers are doing in the field and explore other avenues of presentation, communication and discussion via social networking and related online social spaces. more...