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(U.S.) C2ER offering Basic Analyst training in March in DC

 

The Council for Community and Economic Research will be offering Basic Analyst Training in March in Washington, DC.  Expensive reg, but looks interesting.

 Register

(Limited seats available)

The purpose of this training is to enhance the knowledge, skills and abilities of those new to community and economic development research.  This training provides an overview of key data sources and effective techniques to conduct research in support of economic development strategies.  Participants will discover that while there is lots of data, focusing on a few important elements and using a few proven techniques can provide tremendous insight into the local economic condition and monitoring progress over time.  Training participants also engage in hands-on exercises to find and analyze data within a framework of answering practical, real-world questions that policymakers and practitioners encounter.  For example, when asked to perform quality of life benchmarking, track local trends, or develop information in support of business recruitment, industry cluster building, economic impact assessments, incentive awards, and planning efforts.  Ways to effectively communicate the results from this research to plicy leaders and practitioners are covered. Learn more here.

Participants will learn:

  • Important Data Sources by Topic Area
    • Business & Employment
    • Consumer Activity
    • Demographic
    • Education
    • Residential and Commercial Real Estate
    • Tax Structure & Incentives
    • Transportation & Utilities
    • Quality of Life
    • Workforce
  • Basic Analytic Techniques
  • Basic Industry & Cluster Analysis
  • Business Location Factors
  • Principles of Economic & Fiscal Impact Analysis
  • Primary Data Collection & Survey Methodologies
  • Key Customers & Their Information Needs

Instructors:
Patty Silverstein, President, Development Research Partners
Martin Romitti, Senior Vice President, Center for Regional Economic Competitiveness

Registration Fees:
Before March 1, 2012
C2er Members/LMI Training Institute Member States* - $650
Non-Members - $780

After March 1, 2012
C2er/LMI Training Institute Members* - $780
Non-Members - $935

*Member rates are available to LMI Training Institute Member State staff and C2ER Members. 

New members may obtain member rates by including their membership application and payment with their registration. Learn more about becoming a C2ER Mmeber here.

For registration, course content, or logistical questions, please contact Spencer Abrams (703) 522-4980 x1027.

The Denton Declaration: An Open Data Manifesto

On May 22, 2012 at the University of North Texas (UNT), a group of technologists, librarians, scholars, researchers, university administrators, and other stakeholders gathered to discuss and articulate best practices and emerging trends in research data management. This declaration bridges the converging interests of these stakeholders and promotes collaboration, transparency, and accountability across organizational and disciplinary boundaries. Declarations that emerged included the following:

  • Open access to research data is critical for advancing science, scholarship, and society.
  • Research data, when repurposed, has an accretive value.
  • Publicly funded research should be publicly available for public good.
  • Transparency in research is essential to sustain the public trust.
  • The validation of research data by the peer community is an essential function of the responsible conduct of research.
  • Managing research data is the responsibility of a broad community of stakeholders including researchers, funders, institutions, libraries, archivists, and the public.

For more information, see the web page of the Denton Declaration.

IASSIST Fellows Application Form 2013

The IASSIST Fellows Program is pleased to announce that it is now accepting applications for financial support to attend the IASSIST 2013 conference in Cologne [http://www.iassist2013.org/], from data professionals who are developing, supporting and managing data infrastructures at their home institutions.

It should be noted that funding is not intended to cover the entire cost of attending the conference and that the applicant’s home institution must provide some level of financial support to supplement an IASSIST Fellow award. Strong preference will be given to first time participants and applicants from those countries currently with insufficient representation at IASSIST. Only fully completed applications will be considered. Applicants submitting a paper for the conference will be given priority consideration for funding.

You may apply for funding via this form.The deadline for applications is the 31st of January 2013.

For more information, to apply for funding or nominate a person for a Fellowship, please send an email to the Fellows Committee Co-chairs, Luis Martínez-Uribe (lmartinez@march.es) and Stuart Macdonald (stuart.macdonald@ed.ac.uk).

If you need further information please let us know
Best wishes,

Luis Martinez-Uribe and Stuart Macdonald
IASSIST Fellows Committee Co-chairs

ICPSR Webinar on working with IRB's

For those of you who follow the IASSIST Interest Group on Human Subjects Review Committees and Privacy and Confidentiality in Research, you might be interested in this webinar:

Amy Pienta and Kaye Marz of ICPSR's National Addiction and HIV Data Archive Program will present a webinar on Nov. 28 titled "Navigating Your IRB to Share Research Data."

They will share guidelines for working with Institutional Review Boards to release data that may contain sensitive information, such as studies on substance abuse. This session will be relevant both to older data collections, which may not have been designed with sharing in mind, as well as newer studies that may have more complex designs. Please join us by reserving a seat at https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/225075386.

Now Accepting Proposals for IASSIST 2013

IASSIST 2013 will be hosted by GESIS – Leibniz Institute for the Social Sciences at Maternushaus in Cologne, Germany from May 28-31.

The Conference Website can be accessed here: http://www.iassist2013.org/iassist-2013-home/

As announced previously, the theme of this year’s conference is Data Innovation: Increasing Accessibility, Visibility and Sustainability

This theme reflects recent efforts across the globe by the largest government agencies down to the smaller independent research units to make data (be it survey, administrative, geospatial, or scientific) more open, accessible and understandable for all.

With an ever-increasing availability of new technologies offering unparalleled opportunities to sustainably deliver, share, model and visualize data, we anticipate that there is much to share with and much to learn from one another.  Interdisciplinarity is a large part of where innovation comes from, and we hope to receive submissions from those in the social sciences, humanities, sciences, and computer science fields.

We welcome submissions on the theme outlined above, and encourage conference participants to propose papers and sessions that would be of interest to a diverse audience. In order to make session formation and scheduling more streamlined, we have created three distinct tracks.  If you are not sure where your submission fits, or feel that it fits into more than one track, that’s perfectly fine. Please do still make your submission, and if accepted, we will find an appropriate fit.

Online submission forms and guidelines for BOTH conference content and workshops are be found here: http://www.iassist2013.org/conference/calls/

NOTE: The top of the page is for sessions/papers/posters/round tables/pecha kuchas the bottom is for workshops – please note that the submission forms are completely separate.

All submissions are due by December 5, 2012.  Notification of acceptance will be made by February 5, 2012

Questions about session/paper submissions may be sent to iassist.twentythirteen@gmail.com
Questions about workshop submission may be sent to the Workshop Coordinator, Lynda Kellam at lmkellam@uncg.edu

Social Sciences Librarian

Position: Social Sciences Librarian
Available: January 1, 2013

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill seeks a creative, enthusiastic, and collaborative Social Sciences Librarian to join the Davis Library Research and Instructional Services Department as the Subject Librarian for the departments of Sociology and Political Science. The Social Sciences Librarian will apply state of the art technology to reference and research work, innovative outreach, evolving collection development, and dynamic data services.

The Social Sciences Librarian will develop and maintain high quality outreach to the faculty and students in departments in the Social Sciences, primarily the departments of Sociology and Political Science; create and deliver innovative and effective instructional resources (workshops, class sessions, course pages, research guides) to enhance learning and research skills; participate in general and specialized reference services (in-person consultations, phone, email, chat) including some weekend work; and collaborate with other librarians to provide data services, concentrating on social science resources including economic and international data sets.

The individual in this position will also select materials relevant to Sociology and Political Science for library purchase, ensuring collections in these areas that meet the University's research and curricular needs; and serve on the Social Sciences collection development team, which collaborates in the evaluation and selection of resources for library purchase.

Librarians at UNC are expected to serve on committees and task forces as needed; be actively involved with local library consortia; participate in regional, national, or international professional and scholarly organizations; and maintain an awareness of emerging research tools, methodologies, and trends in scholarly communication.

The successful candidate will join a vibrant and service-oriented department that supports teaching and research in the humanities and social sciences. The person will report to the Head of the Subject Specialists Section of Davis Research and Instructional Services. The department comprises 14 librarians, 4 support staff, and several student assistants and includes GIS, Data Services, and Government Documents.

Qualifications

Required:
ALA-accredited master's degree in library or information science. Background or experience in the social sciences. Excellent verbal and written communication skills. Experience teaching, training or providing instruction. Strong time management and organizational skills, with an ability to set priorities. Commitment to supporting a diverse user population and an ability to work collaboratively and cooperatively with a diverse group of colleagues.

Preferred:
Advanced degree in a social science discipline. Background or experience in the fields of sociology and/or political science. Experience in an academic library. Experience providing outreach services in a subject specialty. Working knowledge of RefWorks and EndNote. Working knowledge of statistical software packages such as SPSS, STATA, SAS or similar products. Experience using data in the social sciences.

The University and The Libraries
The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is the country's oldest state university. UNC Chapel Hill has an enrollment of approximately 29,000 students, employs more than 3,500 members of the faculty, and offers 69 doctoral degrees as well as professional degrees in dentistry, medicine, pharmacy and law. Library collections include over 6.5 million volumes. The Library is a member of the Association of Research Libraries and the Center for Research Libraries. Together with the libraries at Duke University, North Carolina Central University, and North Carolina State University, the members of the Triangle Research Libraries Network (TRLN) provide services and collections to their students, faculty, and staff in support of the education, research, and service missions of the universities.

The University Library invests proudly in its employees, strives to create a diverse environment of respect and collaboration, and encourages vision and innovation.

The Region
The Triangle region is one of the most desirable places to live and work in North America and offers its residents a wide array of recreational, cultural, and intellectual activities. The mountains or the seashore are less than half day's drive from Chapel Hill.

The University of North Carolina is an equal opportunity employer and is strongly committed to the diversity of our faculty and staff.

Salary and Benefits
This is a twelve-month academic librarian appointment; salary is commensurate with qualifications and experience. Standard state benefits of annual leave, sick leave, and State or optional retirement plan. At the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, librarians enjoy the benefit of academic status and are members of the faculty council.

Deadline for Application
Review of applications will begin on October 1, 2012. Applications will be accepted until the position is filled, but preference will be given to applications received by the begin review date.

To Apply:
Please visit http://unc.peopleadmin.com/postings/8226 and complete the online application. Please include a letter of application, a resume and the name, mailing address, email address, and telephone number of three professional references, one of which must be a current supervisor. Additionally, please indicate in your cover letter where you first learned of this position.

Data-related blog posts coming out of Open Repositories 2012 conference

I 'd been meaning to write an IASSIST blog post about OR 2012, hosted by the University of Edinburgh's Host Organising Committee led by Co-Chair and IASSISTer Stuart Macdonald in July, because it had such good DATA content.

Fortunately Simon Hodson, the UK's JISC Managing Research Data Programme Manager, has provided this introduction and has allowed me to post it here, with further links to his analytic blog posts, and even those contain further links to OTHER blog posts talking about OR2012 and data!

There are also more relevant pointers from the OR 2012 home page here: http://or2012.ed.ac.uk/2012/08/20/another-round-of-highlights/

I think there's enough here to easily keep people going until next year's conference in Prince Edward Island next July. Oh, and Peter Burnhill, Past President IASSIST, made a good plug for IASSIST in his closing keynote, pointing it out to repository professionals as a source of expertise and community for would-be data professionals.

Enjoy! - Robin Rice, University of Edinburgh

---Forward----

It has been widely remarked that OR 2012 saw the arrival of research data in the repository world.  Using a wordle of #or2012 tweets in his closing summary, Peter Burnhill noted that ‘Data is the big arrival. There is a sense in which data is now mainstream.’  (See Peter’s summary on the OR2012 You Tube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0jQRDWq-dhc&feature=plcp).

I have written a series of blog posts reflecting on the contributions made by *some* those working on research data repositories, and particularly the development of research data services http://or2012.ed.ac.uk/2012/08/20/another-round-of-highlights/.

These posts may be of interest to subscribers to this list and are listed below.

Institutional Data Repositories and the Curation Hierarchy: reflections on the DCC-ICPSR workshop at OR2012 and the Royal Society’s Science as an Open Enterprise report
http://researchdata.jiscinvolve.org/wp/2012/08/06/institutional-data-repositories-and-the-curation-hierarchy-reflections-on-the-dcc-icpsr-workshop-at-or2012-and-the-royal-societys-science-as-an-open-enterprise-report/

‘Data is now Mainstream’: Research Data Projects at OR2012 (Part 1…)
http://researchdata.jiscinvolve.org/wp/2012/08/13/data-is-now-mainstream-research-data-projects-at-or2012-part-1/

Pulling it all Together: Research Data Projects at OR2012 (Part 2…)
http://researchdata.jiscinvolve.org/wp/2012/08/14/pulling-it-all-together-research-data-projects-at-or2012-part-2/

Making the most of institutional data assets: Research Data Projects at OR2012 (Part 3…)
http://researchdata.jiscinvolve.org/wp/2012/08/15/making-the-most-of-institutional-data-assets-research-data-projects-at-or2012-part-3/

Manage locally, discover (inter-)nationally: research data management lessons from Australia at OR2012
http://researchdata.jiscinvolve.org/wp/2012/08/16/manage-locally-discover-inter-nationally-research-data-management-lessons-from-australia-at-or2012/

Simon Hodson [reposted with permission]

- Friday posting -

One of the highlights of the after hours hanging out during IASSIST conferences is getting to play some pool and make geeky data jokes you don't have to explain to anyone.  

For you pool-playing enthusiasts, I share this YouTube of a potential future IASSIST conference goer .. (note, none of us can play anywhere near the level of this 5 yr old.) 

Happy Weekend everyone! 

Data Visualization tools & greater emphasis on teaching to be incorporated into R-Studio!

Reposted from the RStudio Blog:

Welcome Hadley, Winston, and Garrett!

RStudio’s mission from the beginning has been to create powerful tools that support the practices and techniques required for creating trustworthy, high quality analysis. For many years Hadley Wickham has been teaching and working on his own set of tools for R with many of the same core goals. We’ve been collaborating quite a bit with Hadley over the past couple of years and today we’re excited to announce that Hadley, Winston Chang, and Garrett Grolemund are joining RStudio so we can continue to work together much more closely.

You probably know Hadley from his work on ggplot2plyr, and many other packages. Garrett was a PhD student of Hadley’s at Rice, and you might also know him from the lubridate package, which makes dealing with dates and time easier; he’s also been working on new tools for visualisation and new ways of thinking about the process of data analysis. Winston has been working full-time on ggplot2 for the last couple of months, squashing many bugs and repaying a lot of the technical debt that’s accumulated over the years. Winston’s also writing an R Graphics Cookbook for O’Reilly that should be available in the near future.

What does this mean for RStudio? We’ll of course continue developing open-source software like the RStudio IDE, ggplot2, and plyr (among many other projects). One of Hadley’s core focuses at RStudio will also be expanding our mission to include education, which we plan to offer in a variety of formats ranging from in-person training to some innovative new online courses. We’ll also be working on hosted services (like RPubs) as well as some new products that address the challenges of deploying R within larger organizations.

We’re all excited to begin this next phase of work together and will have lots more details to announce later this fall!

  • IASSIST Quarterly

    Publications Special issue: A pioneer data librarian
    Welcome to the special volume of the IASSIST Quarterly (IQ (37):1-4, 2013). This special issue started as exchange of ideas between Libbie Stephenson and Margaret Adams to collect

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