Already a member?

Sign In
Syndicate content

Blogs

Data Visualization tools & greater emphasis on teaching to be incorporated into R-Studio!

Reposted from the RStudio Blog:

Welcome Hadley, Winston, and Garrett!

RStudio’s mission from the beginning has been to create powerful tools that support the practices and techniques required for creating trustworthy, high quality analysis. For many years Hadley Wickham has been teaching and working on his own set of tools for R with many of the same core goals. We’ve been collaborating quite a bit with Hadley over the past couple of years and today we’re excited to announce that Hadley, Winston Chang, and Garrett Grolemund are joining RStudio so we can continue to work together much more closely.

You probably know Hadley from his work on ggplot2plyr, and many other packages. Garrett was a PhD student of Hadley’s at Rice, and you might also know him from the lubridate package, which makes dealing with dates and time easier; he’s also been working on new tools for visualisation and new ways of thinking about the process of data analysis. Winston has been working full-time on ggplot2 for the last couple of months, squashing many bugs and repaying a lot of the technical debt that’s accumulated over the years. Winston’s also writing an R Graphics Cookbook for O’Reilly that should be available in the near future.

What does this mean for RStudio? We’ll of course continue developing open-source software like the RStudio IDE, ggplot2, and plyr (among many other projects). One of Hadley’s core focuses at RStudio will also be expanding our mission to include education, which we plan to offer in a variety of formats ranging from in-person training to some innovative new online courses. We’ll also be working on hosted services (like RPubs) as well as some new products that address the challenges of deploying R within larger organizations.

We’re all excited to begin this next phase of work together and will have lots more details to announce later this fall!

Teaching integrity in empirical research: a soup to nuts protocol

Great work by Richard Ball, an Economics professor at Haverford College and Norm Medeiros, a Haverford librarian. I'm already planning to incorporate their protocol into my formal and informal data literacy instruction. I highly recommend a visit to their website: Teaching integrity in empirical research: a soup to nuts protocol

They've also published a paper on their work. Here's the abstract:

This article describes a protocol the authors developed for teaching undergraduates to document their statistical analyses for empirical research projects so that their results are completely reproducible and verifiable. The protocol is guided by the principle that the documentation prepared to accompany an empirical research project should be sufficient to allow an independent researcher to replicate easily and exactly every step of the data management and analysis that generated the results reported in a study. The authors hope that requiring students to follow this protocol will not only teach them how to document their research appropriately, but also instill in them the belief that such documentation is an important professional responsibility.

Knight Foundation Data Challenge (FYI)

The Knight Foundation announced a data-related grant opportunity in a kind of "tweet your grant proposal" format.   The call has closed but over 800 of the applications are viewable through Tumblr.   

In a simple search of the applications with the words "data professionals" returned 148 results.  Of these, some of the more related are: 

  1. My submission:  A passion for data, and the professionals who keep it alive
  2. A proposal for a dating service for data professionals :} DATABLE | Data based dating
  3. MetaLayer Turns Anyone into a Data Scientist

Have a look and see if there might be someone or some group out there you could be in collaboration with! 

Data Discussion Group at ALA Annual

A number of U.S. IASSISTers were at the recent American Library Association Annual Conference in Anaheim, California.  This years program (finally!) featured a number of data related topics, including the third meeting of the Association of College & Research Libraries Numeric and Geospatial Data Interest Group (DIG).  Our discussion covered topics such as content management systems, data hosting, collection development for small data, and changing professional roles.  A full report of the meeting is available at http://connect.ala.org/node/182442.  This group provides a great opportunity for IASSIST members working in U.S. libraries to meet up for open discussion while at ALA.  ACRL members can learn more about DIG here.

2012 Report from the Interest Group on Human Subjects Review Committees and Privacy and Confidentiality in Research

Topic:
For those of you exploring issues of human subjects, privacy and confidentiality, this group may be of interest.  In the coming year we hope to put together some resources and guides for those working with confidential data or human subjects related work.  Please contact libbie@ucla.edu if you are "interested"!

Interest Group on Human Subjects Review Committees and Privacy and Confidentiality in Research
This group will focus on issues related to conducting research using human subjects in the social sciences. Particular areas of focus and discussion will include, but are not limited to the following:
· The role and function of the human subjects review board as social science research enters the digital age.
· The human subject review influences and effects on data management, dissemination, curation and preservation practices.
· Issues related to protection of human subjects laws and policies established in IASSIST member countries.
· Issues related to privacy and confidentiality of human subjects in research.
We will seek out and take advantage of opportunities for education, outreach and advocacy on subjects related to human subjects review committees, including proposing sessions with rele vant presentations at IASSIST conferences and creating web based resources and tools for members.
2011-2012 Chair: Libbie Stephenson, libbie@ucla.edu

2011-2012 report:  The Interest group has been largely inactive this past year; however two efforts are worthy of mention.  In the U.S. the Department of Health and Human Services circulated an Advanced Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (ANPRM): Human Subjects Research and Reducing Burden, Delay and Ambiguity for Investigators.  The research community was invited to comment.  Given time constraints it was decided that IASSIST (via email discussion with IASSIST AC members) would not make a formal statement; however individual members of IASSIST were encouraged to submit comments.  A link to the details on this effort is here: http://www.hhs.gov/ohrp/humansubjects/anprm2011page.html and contains directions to individual comments. The Interest Group would like to thank George Alter (DataPASS, ICPSR) Micah Altman (MIT) and Joann Juhnke for their support and collaboration on responses to this ANPRM.

A second activity involved a U.S. Office of Science and Technology Request for Information: Public Access to Digital Data Resulting from Federally Funded Scientific Research.  This RFI was broad in scope however, several of the questions were of a human subjects nature and again, IASSIST members were encouraged to submit responses and a number did so. Details on the RFI can be found here: https://www.federalregister.gov/articles/2011/12/23/2011-32947/request-for-information-public-access-to-digital-data-resulting-from-federally-funded-scientific.  The Interest Group would like to thank George Alter (DataPASS, ICPSR) Micah Altman (MIT) for their support and collaboration on responses to this RFI.

The Interest Group would like to continue for another year and unless there is someone else who would like to become Chair, the current Chair is willing to continue in this role.  The Interest Group would welcome suggestions for further activities from the AC if any are forthcoming.

Respectfully submitted,
Libbie Stephenson, Chair

Data Citation Brochure published by the UK's Economic and Social Research Council

Topic:

Just to let you all know that here at the Economic and Social Data Service in the UK we have been working with the ESRC on a brochure to encourage data citation amongst our social scientists and journal publishers.

In October 2011 we minted over 5000 DOIs for our ESDS Collection with Datacite, using a methodology we developed to deal with version changes to our data.  You can view our Webinar that explains how we do this. We have also spoken at various Datacite events.

We are currently sending out over 1000 brochures to all the major UK and key European social science publishers and professional societies in the UK.  View our brochure and feel free to borrow from it!

Louise Corti, ESDS

iassist 2012 conference song

Topic:

My thanks to Vince Gray, Lisa Neidert, and Melanie Wright for help with the lyrics, Melanie for the great guitar accompaniment, and Melanie, Vince, and Kate McNeill for singing along (and thereby drowning out the sound of what passes for my singing voice :)

(Sung, sort of, to the tune of "America the beautiful")

It's 2012 in Washington,
We met for IASSIST;
Unfortunately we're all done,
But memories persist -
     IASSIST oh IASSIST,
     We look forward to you;
     The meetings and the people
     Give us so much to do.

Meetings started Sunday
And all day Monday too;
Workshops took up Tuesday -
Evening reception too.
     Wednesday's plenary began
     Things in a proper way;
     Talks on research management,
     Pecha kuchas filled the day.

Thursday was a special day
Will lots of talks to view;
The boat cruise on a special night -
Eight presidents hove to.
     Wordles, wordles everywhere,
     And metadata too;
     Captain Carrot's data cows
     Make data folks say "mooooo".

On Friday things start winding down -
We all start going home.
The song starts getting written down -
The banner finds a new home.
     IASSISTers, please persist;
     We'll meet you all next year
     In 2013 in Cologne,
     We'll drink the better beer!

IASSIST Publishes a Quick Guide to Data Citation

Topic:

The IASSIST Special Interest Group on Data Citation is very pleased to announce the publication of its Quick Guide to Data Citation!

These professionally-printed guides, provided by IASSIST, will be available at the IASSIST 2012 conference; come by the SIGDC poster to pick up your complimentary copies!

http://iassistdata.org/sites/default/files/quick_guide_to_data_citation_high-res_printer-ready.pdf

Learn more about printing or downloading more copies at http://iassistdata.org/community/sigdc.

In other SIGDC news, Elizabeth Moss and Hailey Mooney will be taking over as co-chairs from Mary Vardigan and Michael Witt. As we head into our second year, thanks to everyone for their continued interest and participation in the group.


IASSIST 2012 - Registration Now Open

Topic:

We are pleased to announce that registration is now open for the IASSIST 2012 Conference!

IASSIST 2012 conference site: http://www.iassist2012.org/index.html

Conference Theme: Data Science for a Connected World: Unlocking and Harnessing the Power of Information

Dates: June 4th – 8th, Washington D.C. USA.

Register before May 1st to take advantage of special conference and workshops rates. Fees and other details are available at: http://www.iassist2012.org/indexfolder/Register/index.php

The theme “Data Science for a Connected World: Unlocking and Harnessing the Power of Information” reflects the growing desire of research communities, government agencies and other organizations to build connections and benefit from the better use of data through practicing good management, dissemination and preservation techniques.

Information about the papers, panels, and other events can be found at: http://www.iassist2012.org/indexfolder/program

The theme for IASSIST 2012 is also reflective of this year's host city and nation's capital: Washington, DC. The seat of many US government agencies, as well as major international institutions like the World Bank and IMF, Washington is an ideal backdrop for discussing the importance of data sharing and management or international best practices. The city is also known for its vibrant nightlife, emerging cultural scene, historical sites, and free museums (check out post- conference tours options!).

We look forward to welcoming you to Washington DC for the IASSIST 2012 Conference.

Results of Data Management Plan Poll

Those members who follow IASST-L may recall that about a month ago I launched an informal poll to find out whether or not your data management plan services include reading and reviewing draft plans. I had a total of 22 respondents with the following results:

Does your data management plan service include reading and reviewing draft plans?

  • 18% (4) - Yes, as a matter of  policy.
  • 36% (8) - Not a policy, but I have reviewed them in the past.
  • 36% (8) - Not a policy, but I'd seriously consider doing it.
  • 9% (2) - Not a policy but I most likely wouldn't do it.
  • 0% (0) - No, as a matter of policy.

Several repondents posted the following  comments. (All commenters identified themselves by name in the poll, but I'll keep their identities anonymous here, just in case.)

  • I coordinate development of the DCC's DMP Online data management planning tool. One of the functions we are adding for v3.0 (which is set to launch this Spring) is a facility to share read/write permissions with other users. We'll be very interested in seeing how popular this proves, as it will enable more collaborative development of DMPs by the researchers AND the research support staff, data librarians, IT people, etc who are also stakeholders in the data management endeavour.
  • We are on record as making the offer to help formulate and/or review DM plans. No written policy as yet, but it's something we're targetting as a service.
  • I've always offered this service in my dept. The LSE is currently looking at formalising a data management policy. One of the main aims of this is supporting researchers who need to make data available for reuse as part of their funding conditions. As part of this it is likely that some support for DMPs would be offered, but whether this would be generic, on-line tools, or one-to-one support has not been decided yet.
  • We offer this as an optional service had about 70 such reviews in our first year. We do have a caveat about the service on our website - see "limitations to services" on https://confluence.cornell.edu/display/rdmsgweb/About.
  • The review is optional, not mandatory, and offered as an advertised service.
  • I have read through a few plans when people have asked me to but I don't edit them and have commented when asked directly but have concerns about doing that. I usually state what I can and cannot give advice on and refer to appropriate office on campus when necessary (e.g., technology transfer for IP issues). Fortunately, most of the comments have had to do with where to put their data at the end (which I guess is more of a question on where to archive things rather than reviewing the plans). Typically I refer people back to sources and examples to help support writing their plans. I just find that when researchers ask me to look at their plans, most of the time they are really asking me questions about specific details with data management and not so much with editing the plan. If they did want me to edit it I would say no.

Many thanks to all of you who took the time to respond. I'm sure many will find this information useful.

Harrison Dekker, UC Berkeley Data Lab

  • IASSIST Quarterly

    Publications Special issue: A pioneer data librarian
    Welcome to the special volume of the IASSIST Quarterly (IQ (37):1-4, 2013). This special issue started as exchange of ideas between Libbie Stephenson and Margaret Adams to collect

    more...

  • Resources

    Resources

    A space for IASSIST members to share professional resources useful to them in their daily work. Also the IASSIST Jobs Repository for an archive of data-related position descriptions. more...

  • community

    • LinkedIn
    • Facebook
    • Twitter

    Find out what IASSISTers are doing in the field and explore other avenues of presentation, communication and discussion via social networking and related online social spaces. more...