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Data-related blog posts coming out of Open Repositories 2012 conference

I 'd been meaning to write an IASSIST blog post about OR 2012, hosted by the University of Edinburgh's Host Organising Committee led by Co-Chair and IASSISTer Stuart Macdonald in July, because it had such good DATA content.

Fortunately Simon Hodson, the UK's JISC Managing Research Data Programme Manager, has provided this introduction and has allowed me to post it here, with further links to his analytic blog posts, and even those contain further links to OTHER blog posts talking about OR2012 and data!

There are also more relevant pointers from the OR 2012 home page here: http://or2012.ed.ac.uk/2012/08/20/another-round-of-highlights/

I think there's enough here to easily keep people going until next year's conference in Prince Edward Island next July. Oh, and Peter Burnhill, Past President IASSIST, made a good plug for IASSIST in his closing keynote, pointing it out to repository professionals as a source of expertise and community for would-be data professionals.

Enjoy! - Robin Rice, University of Edinburgh

---Forward----

It has been widely remarked that OR 2012 saw the arrival of research data in the repository world.  Using a wordle of #or2012 tweets in his closing summary, Peter Burnhill noted that ‘Data is the big arrival. There is a sense in which data is now mainstream.’  (See Peter’s summary on the OR2012 You Tube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0jQRDWq-dhc&feature=plcp).

I have written a series of blog posts reflecting on the contributions made by *some* those working on research data repositories, and particularly the development of research data services http://or2012.ed.ac.uk/2012/08/20/another-round-of-highlights/.

These posts may be of interest to subscribers to this list and are listed below.

Institutional Data Repositories and the Curation Hierarchy: reflections on the DCC-ICPSR workshop at OR2012 and the Royal Society’s Science as an Open Enterprise report
http://researchdata.jiscinvolve.org/wp/2012/08/06/institutional-data-repositories-and-the-curation-hierarchy-reflections-on-the-dcc-icpsr-workshop-at-or2012-and-the-royal-societys-science-as-an-open-enterprise-report/

‘Data is now Mainstream’: Research Data Projects at OR2012 (Part 1…)
http://researchdata.jiscinvolve.org/wp/2012/08/13/data-is-now-mainstream-research-data-projects-at-or2012-part-1/

Pulling it all Together: Research Data Projects at OR2012 (Part 2…)
http://researchdata.jiscinvolve.org/wp/2012/08/14/pulling-it-all-together-research-data-projects-at-or2012-part-2/

Making the most of institutional data assets: Research Data Projects at OR2012 (Part 3…)
http://researchdata.jiscinvolve.org/wp/2012/08/15/making-the-most-of-institutional-data-assets-research-data-projects-at-or2012-part-3/

Manage locally, discover (inter-)nationally: research data management lessons from Australia at OR2012
http://researchdata.jiscinvolve.org/wp/2012/08/16/manage-locally-discover-inter-nationally-research-data-management-lessons-from-australia-at-or2012/

Simon Hodson [reposted with permission]

- Friday posting -

One of the highlights of the after hours hanging out during IASSIST conferences is getting to play some pool and make geeky data jokes you don't have to explain to anyone.  

For you pool-playing enthusiasts, I share this YouTube of a potential future IASSIST conference goer .. (note, none of us can play anywhere near the level of this 5 yr old.) 

Happy Weekend everyone! 

Data Visualization tools & greater emphasis on teaching to be incorporated into R-Studio!

Reposted from the RStudio Blog:

Welcome Hadley, Winston, and Garrett!

RStudio’s mission from the beginning has been to create powerful tools that support the practices and techniques required for creating trustworthy, high quality analysis. For many years Hadley Wickham has been teaching and working on his own set of tools for R with many of the same core goals. We’ve been collaborating quite a bit with Hadley over the past couple of years and today we’re excited to announce that Hadley, Winston Chang, and Garrett Grolemund are joining RStudio so we can continue to work together much more closely.

You probably know Hadley from his work on ggplot2plyr, and many other packages. Garrett was a PhD student of Hadley’s at Rice, and you might also know him from the lubridate package, which makes dealing with dates and time easier; he’s also been working on new tools for visualisation and new ways of thinking about the process of data analysis. Winston has been working full-time on ggplot2 for the last couple of months, squashing many bugs and repaying a lot of the technical debt that’s accumulated over the years. Winston’s also writing an R Graphics Cookbook for O’Reilly that should be available in the near future.

What does this mean for RStudio? We’ll of course continue developing open-source software like the RStudio IDE, ggplot2, and plyr (among many other projects). One of Hadley’s core focuses at RStudio will also be expanding our mission to include education, which we plan to offer in a variety of formats ranging from in-person training to some innovative new online courses. We’ll also be working on hosted services (like RPubs) as well as some new products that address the challenges of deploying R within larger organizations.

We’re all excited to begin this next phase of work together and will have lots more details to announce later this fall!

Teaching integrity in empirical research: a soup to nuts protocol

Great work by Richard Ball, an Economics professor at Haverford College and Norm Medeiros, a Haverford librarian. I'm already planning to incorporate their protocol into my formal and informal data literacy instruction. I highly recommend a visit to their website: Teaching integrity in empirical research: a soup to nuts protocol

They've also published a paper on their work. Here's the abstract:

This article describes a protocol the authors developed for teaching undergraduates to document their statistical analyses for empirical research projects so that their results are completely reproducible and verifiable. The protocol is guided by the principle that the documentation prepared to accompany an empirical research project should be sufficient to allow an independent researcher to replicate easily and exactly every step of the data management and analysis that generated the results reported in a study. The authors hope that requiring students to follow this protocol will not only teach them how to document their research appropriately, but also instill in them the belief that such documentation is an important professional responsibility.

Knight Foundation Data Challenge (FYI)

The Knight Foundation announced a data-related grant opportunity in a kind of "tweet your grant proposal" format.   The call has closed but over 800 of the applications are viewable through Tumblr.   

In a simple search of the applications with the words "data professionals" returned 148 results.  Of these, some of the more related are: 

  1. My submission:  A passion for data, and the professionals who keep it alive
  2. A proposal for a dating service for data professionals :} DATABLE | Data based dating
  3. MetaLayer Turns Anyone into a Data Scientist

Have a look and see if there might be someone or some group out there you could be in collaboration with! 

Data Discussion Group at ALA Annual

A number of U.S. IASSISTers were at the recent American Library Association Annual Conference in Anaheim, California.  This years program (finally!) featured a number of data related topics, including the third meeting of the Association of College & Research Libraries Numeric and Geospatial Data Interest Group (DIG).  Our discussion covered topics such as content management systems, data hosting, collection development for small data, and changing professional roles.  A full report of the meeting is available at http://connect.ala.org/node/182442.  This group provides a great opportunity for IASSIST members working in U.S. libraries to meet up for open discussion while at ALA.  ACRL members can learn more about DIG here.

2012 Report from the Interest Group on Human Subjects Review Committees and Privacy and Confidentiality in Research

Topic:
For those of you exploring issues of human subjects, privacy and confidentiality, this group may be of interest.  In the coming year we hope to put together some resources and guides for those working with confidential data or human subjects related work.  Please contact libbie@ucla.edu if you are "interested"!

Interest Group on Human Subjects Review Committees and Privacy and Confidentiality in Research
This group will focus on issues related to conducting research using human subjects in the social sciences. Particular areas of focus and discussion will include, but are not limited to the following:
· The role and function of the human subjects review board as social science research enters the digital age.
· The human subject review influences and effects on data management, dissemination, curation and preservation practices.
· Issues related to protection of human subjects laws and policies established in IASSIST member countries.
· Issues related to privacy and confidentiality of human subjects in research.
We will seek out and take advantage of opportunities for education, outreach and advocacy on subjects related to human subjects review committees, including proposing sessions with rele vant presentations at IASSIST conferences and creating web based resources and tools for members.
2011-2012 Chair: Libbie Stephenson, libbie@ucla.edu

2011-2012 report:  The Interest group has been largely inactive this past year; however two efforts are worthy of mention.  In the U.S. the Department of Health and Human Services circulated an Advanced Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (ANPRM): Human Subjects Research and Reducing Burden, Delay and Ambiguity for Investigators.  The research community was invited to comment.  Given time constraints it was decided that IASSIST (via email discussion with IASSIST AC members) would not make a formal statement; however individual members of IASSIST were encouraged to submit comments.  A link to the details on this effort is here: http://www.hhs.gov/ohrp/humansubjects/anprm2011page.html and contains directions to individual comments. The Interest Group would like to thank George Alter (DataPASS, ICPSR) Micah Altman (MIT) and Joann Juhnke for their support and collaboration on responses to this ANPRM.

A second activity involved a U.S. Office of Science and Technology Request for Information: Public Access to Digital Data Resulting from Federally Funded Scientific Research.  This RFI was broad in scope however, several of the questions were of a human subjects nature and again, IASSIST members were encouraged to submit responses and a number did so. Details on the RFI can be found here: https://www.federalregister.gov/articles/2011/12/23/2011-32947/request-for-information-public-access-to-digital-data-resulting-from-federally-funded-scientific.  The Interest Group would like to thank George Alter (DataPASS, ICPSR) Micah Altman (MIT) for their support and collaboration on responses to this RFI.

The Interest Group would like to continue for another year and unless there is someone else who would like to become Chair, the current Chair is willing to continue in this role.  The Interest Group would welcome suggestions for further activities from the AC if any are forthcoming.

Respectfully submitted,
Libbie Stephenson, Chair

Data Citation Brochure published by the UK's Economic and Social Research Council

Topic:

Just to let you all know that here at the Economic and Social Data Service in the UK we have been working with the ESRC on a brochure to encourage data citation amongst our social scientists and journal publishers.

In October 2011 we minted over 5000 DOIs for our ESDS Collection with Datacite, using a methodology we developed to deal with version changes to our data.  You can view our Webinar that explains how we do this. We have also spoken at various Datacite events.

We are currently sending out over 1000 brochures to all the major UK and key European social science publishers and professional societies in the UK.  View our brochure and feel free to borrow from it!

Louise Corti, ESDS

iassist 2012 conference song

Topic:

My thanks to Vince Gray, Lisa Neidert, and Melanie Wright for help with the lyrics, Melanie for the great guitar accompaniment, and Melanie, Vince, and Kate McNeill for singing along (and thereby drowning out the sound of what passes for my singing voice :)

(Sung, sort of, to the tune of "America the beautiful")

It's 2012 in Washington,
We met for IASSIST;
Unfortunately we're all done,
But memories persist -
     IASSIST oh IASSIST,
     We look forward to you;
     The meetings and the people
     Give us so much to do.

Meetings started Sunday
And all day Monday too;
Workshops took up Tuesday -
Evening reception too.
     Wednesday's plenary began
     Things in a proper way;
     Talks on research management,
     Pecha kuchas filled the day.

Thursday was a special day
Will lots of talks to view;
The boat cruise on a special night -
Eight presidents hove to.
     Wordles, wordles everywhere,
     And metadata too;
     Captain Carrot's data cows
     Make data folks say "mooooo".

On Friday things start winding down -
We all start going home.
The song starts getting written down -
The banner finds a new home.
     IASSISTers, please persist;
     We'll meet you all next year
     In 2013 in Cologne,
     We'll drink the better beer!

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