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IASSIST will be at RDAP!

For those of you attending the RDAP Summit next week in Atlanta, GA, USA, be sure to keep an eye out for IASSIST. We are a sponsoring organization—check out the advance thank you blog post from RDAP.

Our VP, Jen Green, will be on the scene with promoting IASSIST at the poster session. Be sure to stop by to say "hi" and pick up your very own IASSIST logo button. 

Looking forward to hearing the report back from RDAP!

2016 IASSIST Fellowships

The IASSIST Fellows Committee are pleased to announce that we will be awarding an IASSIST Fellowship award for the 2016 conference to the following recipients:

Marijana Glavica - Systems Librarian, University of Zagreb, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, Croatia

'As a systems librarian I work with bibliographic data and manage library automation systems. I am also involved in designing library policies and procedures. As a subject specialist I provide information services to psychology professors and students, and I teach a course about information resources in psychology. In the last few years I started to work towards establishment of data archive and services for the social sciences in Croatia, an effort supported by SERSCIDA project in the past and currently by two ongoing projects - SEEDS and CESSDA-SaW.'

Dr Bhojaraju Gunjal - Head of Central Library, National Institute of Technology Rourkela, India

'I am serving as Head, Central Library (Deputy Librarian) of our institute library since August, 2014. In this capacity, I am responsible for management of the Biju Patnaik Central Library of this institute which employs 33 people including library staff, trainees, support staff and has an annual budget of over Rs. 6 Crores.

Our library manages institutional repositories using the DSpace and e-Prints tools with a number of new initiatives  under progress such as integrating ORCID with all our repositories, research data management, etc.  In this regard, programs like IASSIST will definitely help in managing our data repositories in much more effective way.

The library also provides special services by implementing state-of-the-art technologies in various initiatives such as Research data management, Liaison Program, Migration of library software to Open Source tools, Integration of Bio-metric with RFID, Mobile Apps including SMS/email alerts, QR Code, Knowledge Management aspects, Discovery Services, etc. for our library.

I will use this acquired knowledge through the Fellows program for the development of our library data repositories in developing, supporting and managing data infrastructures for our users and help other fellow colleagues in implementing the same in other libraries of India.'

Shima Moradisomehsaraei - Lecturer, Tehran Medical University & Azad University, Iran

'I teach information science and Information technology related courses to library , Medical Information system and Medical bioinformatic students. This means I teach students on how to use softwares to manage,correct and analysis data and how to design models and graphs. Teaching on the "indexing and retrieving" course we work on big data and linked data issues. I also teach on another related course "medical information systems" which I discusses big data and how it influences medical data of the whole society.'

Ya-Chi Lin, Data Specialist, Survey Research Data Archive, Academia Sinica, Taiwan

'Our institution, Survey Research Data Archive (SRDA) is an electronic library of the largest collection of digital data in social sciences in Taiwan. Part of my work entails is to promote SRDA and help SRDA members to use data to conduct secondary data analysis. I go to the campus and launch webinars to introduce the academic survey data and government survey data, and the enquiry service of SRDA to potential users.'

We would like to welcome our fellows into the IASSIST community and we're sure that they'll be made to feel at home by all IASSIST members at our forthcoming conference in Bergen, Norway.

Stuart Macdonald & Florio Arguillas (Chairs of IASSIST Fellows Committee)

Latest Issue of IQ Available! Data Documentation Initiative - Results, Tools, and Further Initiatives

Welcome to the third issue of Volume 39 of the IASSIST Quarterly (IQ 39:3, 2015). This special issue is guest edited by Joachim Wackerow of GESIS – Leibniz Institute for the Social Sciences in Germany and Mary Vardigan of ICPSR at the University of Michigan, USA. That sentence is a direct plagiarism from the editor’s notes of the recent double issue (IQ 38:4 & 39:1). We are very grateful for all the work Mary and Achim have carried out and are developing further in the continuing story of the Data Documentation Initiative (DDI), and for their efforts in presenting the work here in the ASSIST Quarterly.

As in the recent double issue on DDI this special issue also presents results, tools, and further initiatives. The DDI started 20 years ago and much has been accomplished. However, creative people are still refining and improving it, as well as developing new areas for the use of DDI.

Mary Vardigan and Joachim Wackerow give on the next page an overview of the content of DDI papers in this issue.

Let me then applaud the two guest editors and also the many authors who made this possible:

  • Alerk Amin, RAND Cooperation, www.rand.org, USA
  • Ingo Barkow, Associate Professor for Data Management at the University for Applied Sciences Eastern Switzerland (HTW Chur), Switzerland
  • Stefan Kramer, American University, Washington, DC, USA
  • David Schiller, Research Data Centre (FDZ) of the German Federal Employment Agency (BA) at the Institute for Employment Research (IAB)
  • Jeremy Williams, Cornell Institute for Social and Economic Research, USA
  • Larry Hoyle, senior scientist at the Institute for Policy & Social Research at the University of Kansas, USA
  • Joachim Wackerow, metadata expert at GESIS - Leibniz Institute for the Social Sciences, Germany
  • William Poynter, UCL Institute of Education, London, UK
  • Jennifer Spiegel, UCL Institute of Education, London, UK
  • Jay Greenfield, health informatics architect working with data standards, USA
  • Sam Hume, vice president of SHARE Technology and Services at CDISC, USA
  • Sanda Ionescu, user support for data and documentation, ICPSR, USA
  • Jeremy Iverson, co-founder and partner at Colectica, USA
  • John Kunze, systems architect at the California Digital Library, USA
  • Barry Radler, researcher at the University of Wisconsin Institute on Aging, USA
  • Wendy Thomas, director of the Data Access Core in the Minnesota Population Center (MPC) at the University of Minnesota, USA
  • Mary Vardigan, archivist at the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR), USA
  • Stuart Weibel, worked in OCLC Research, USA
  • Michael Witt, associate professor of Library Science at Purdue University, USA.

I hope you will enjoy their work in this issue, and I am certain that the contact authors will enjoy hearing from you
about new potential results, tools, and initiatives.

Articles for the IASSIST Quarterly are always very welcome. They can be papers from IASSIST conferences or other
conferences and workshops, from local presentations or papers especially written for the IQ. When you are preparing
a presentation, give a thought to turning your one-time presentation into a lasting contribution to continuing development. As an author you are permitted ‘deep links’ where you link directly to your paper published in the IQ. Chairing a conference session with the purpose of aggregating and integrating papers for a special issue IQ is also much appreciated as the information reaches many more people than the session participants, and will be readily available on the IASSIST website at http://www.iassistdata.org.

Authors are very welcome to take a look at the instructions and layout: http://iassistdata.org/iq/instructions-authors. Authors can also contact me via e-mail: kbr@sam.sdu.dk.

Should you be interested in compiling a special issue for the IQ as guest editor(s) I will also be delighted to hear from you.

Karsten Boye Rasmussen
September 2015
Editor

New Perspectives on DDI

This issue features four papers that look at leveraging the structured metadata provided by DDI in
different ways. The first, “Design Considerations for DDI-Based Data Systems,“ aims to help decisionmakers
by highlighting the approach of using relational databases for data storage in contrast to
representing DDI in its native XML format. The second paper, “DDI as a Common Format for Export
and Import for Statistical Packages,” describes an experiment using the program Stat/Transfer to
move datasets among five popular packages with DDI Lifecycle as an intermediary format. The paper
“Protocol Development for Large-Scale Metadata Archiving Using DDI Lifecycle” discusses the use
of a DDI profile to document CLOSER (Cohorts and Longitudinal Studies Enhancement Resources,
www.closer.ac.uk), which brings together nine of the UK’s longitudinal cohort studies by producing a
metadata discovery platform (MDP). And finally, “DDI and Enhanced Data Citation“ reports on efforts in
extend data citation information in DDI to include a larger set of elements and a taxonomy for the role
of research contributors.

Mary Vardigan - vardigan@umich.edu
Joachim Wackerow - Joachim.Wackerow@gesis.org

Digital Scholarship Librarian Opening at Kansas City Fed

Topic:

Please see the announcement below for a new position created here in the Center for the Advancement of Data and Research in Economics at the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City .  It will be part of the content support team that works with our technology specialists to support, enhance and advance data or computationally intensive research in economics.   This position reports to me and has supervisory responsibility for our library staff.  Please let me know if I can answer any questions.

San Cannon

sandra.cannon@kc.frb.org

To apply:  https://frb.taleo.net/careersection/jobdetail.ftl?job=244803

Digital scholarship Librarian

This new position will manage a team of three library staff as part of the Center for the Advancement for Data and Research in Economics (CADRE). In addition to continuing to provide reference services, strategic collection development, and other information services, this team will spearhead new research support initiatives such as curation of research data, promotion of Bank research and analytical output, and educating the research staff on issues related to intellectual property and emerging measures and metrics for assessing the scholarly impact of publications and other forms of scholarly expression. Specific responsibilities for the position include:

  • Develop and implement data management, data curation, and data publication and access initiatives, working closely with the technology staff, researchers, and others. 
  • Lead the library and the Bank in developing a vision for policies, strategies, programs, and staffing that supports and advances scholarly expression by researchers across the variety of business lines engaged in such work. Work with Board and System library and research staff to fully account for potential partnerships and shared services, leveraging existing relationships and collaborations where available and appropriate and suggesting new connections or associations where necessary.
  • Work closely with Legal, Public Affairs, Information Security, and others to develop mechanisms that can enable the dissemination of research products such as computer code and data and help address specific questions regarding intellectual property and licensing, as well as related questions with confident and reliable answers.
  • Actively and purposefully manage current library staff to ensure full engagement and appropriate application of talents and resources while making measurable strides towards the strategic vision of operating as a vital and vibrant organization focused on connecting users with information and data to support activities along the entire span of the research lifecycle .

The successful candidate is expected to be active professionally and to contribute to developments in the field.

Qualifications

Required: ALA-accredited graduate degree or accredited graduate degree in an appropriate discipline. At least 5 years of professional experience with at least 3 years of a progressively growing portfolio in leadership and administration of research libraries.

Preferred: Demonstrated and broad knowledge and expertise regarding scholarly communications and scholarly publishing issues. Deep understanding of scholarly and research enterprise at research universities or other research oriented institutions. Comprehensive knowledge and understanding of the evolving digital context for scholarship, research, teaching, and creative expression. Wide-ranging knowledge and understanding of scholarly publishing initiatives in research libraries, including technology platforms for publishing, staffing options, and business models. Experience with new information technologies. Strong interpersonal, collaboration, and teambuilding skills. Impeccable presentation, written, and oral communication skills.

 To apply: https://frb.taleo.net/careersection/jobdetail.ftl?job=244803

International Digital Curation Conference 2016 (IDCC16)

The International Digital Curation Conference 2016 was in Amsterdam between 23-24 February.

IASSIST was again a sponsor, and presented a poster on IASSIST members’ activities. In addition, plenty of familiar faces were present including our current IASSIST president and three former ones.

This year’s conference was the eleventh IDCC and took the title of "Visible data, invisible infrastructure". This asks what can we do to make the hard work of preserving data and making it and keeping it usable as easy as possible for researchers to use and as unobtrusive as possible in their work.

One feature of this year’s conference was the importance of terminology. In his opening keynote, Barend Mons made a good point that accessible data is not open data and sharing data does not make it reusable. Reusable is what is important. In his plenary, Andrew Sallans spoke of openness and sharing as core to scientific activity. His presentation was insightful on how data is lost (paywalls, broken links, TIF walls), as was his call for five percent of research budgets be reserved for data stewardship and the need for Europe to train 500,000 data experts in the next decade. The final keynote from Susan Halford was a warning about sloppy research methodology as researchers gorge on new big data sources. Using social media as an example, she cautioned on how these are not “naturally occurring” data but mediated by private companies using methods we do not know about.

The rest of the conference split into concurrent sessions with either a national or institutional focus, or featuring demonstrations and elaborations on tools and services. It is interesting to see how ventures like Dataverse and DMPonline/Tool fit into national infrastructure initiatives like Australian National Data Service or Canada’s Portage and institutional ones like those demonstrated by the universities of Oxford and California. If they are to do so successfully, it will be with a vison of enabling researchers to do better science rather than compelling researchers to comply with bureaucracy, and that the route to achieving this will be through open standards and building on existing initiatives rather than going back to constructing new tools to do essentially the same job.

An impressive feature of IDCC is the methodological rigour applied to research papers. An example to highlight from the programme was Renata Curty’s research on Factors influencing research data reuse in social sciences.

The final notable aspect of IDCC16 was how almost none of the suggestions in keynotes and tools presented supported “traditional” academic publishing. Reuse needs discoverable, machine readable, contextualised data with minimal barriers to access and minimal limits on usage – not the business model on which some well-known academic publishers thrive.

All presentations, posters, demonstrations, as well as blogs reporting on IDCC16 can be found on the DCC website.

Share Your Story: Case Studies of Data Reuse

Late last year, a colleague at Innovations for Poverty Action, Stephanie Wykstra, and I started having conversations about reuse of open data and what we do and don’t know about the re-use of existing data sets, particularly which data sets and how they are used.  We are also interested in the specific challenges researchers face as they try to re-use data sets collected for other research purposes.  Stephanie and I would like to start filling this gap so we are putting out a call for case studies.

If you have re-used data for your own research (or know someone else who has), we would love to hear about it! The parameters and further details for the call can be found in this blog post on the Mozilla Science Lab blog: https://www.mozillascience.org/share-your-story.

We are particularly interested in stories of data re-use that are not from large-scale surveys or census data sets as there are many examples of those.  We are also aware of some instances where large data repositories collect information on use of data sets housed in their collections (see ICPSR Bibliography of Data-related Literature and UK Data Archive).  While we will be incorporating some of those cases in our report, we’d like to hear more about stories that may not be included in those collections.

There is a very simple form at the blog post linked above.  We are basically interested in:

1) What made the data that you re-used valuable for your own research?

2) What made the data easy or challenging to re-use?

and

3) Your advice to researchers who are sharing their data for re-use.  

The deadline for submitting case studies is March 10, 2016.  We will make all responses publicly available in a report after an analysis of the responses (with your permission). Depending on funding, we may be able to sponsor researchers who provide case studies to a workshop on data re-use.  Please spread this call far and wide to any you think would be interested in participating.  

If you have questions, feel free to tweet or email either Stephanie Wykstra (@Swykstr) or myself, Stephanie Wright (@shefw).  We appreciate any support you can provide!

IASSIST Quarterly back issues all online

Dear Friends,

The IASSIST Communications Committee is very happy to announce that the back issues of IQ--ALL of the back issues, back to 1976--are now available on the IASSIST web site.  In the left sidebar where you are able to select from a few back issues, you may recall there is a link at the bottom to More issues.  That link can now transport you back to the early days of the association.  Older issues are wonderful to peruse, offering a window into how far we've come and at the same time putting in perspective the many on-going issues with which we're still grappling, all these years later.  Please take a moment to take a walk down memory lane and reflect on the past and future of IASSIST.  And please congratulate Robin Rice and Harrison Dekker for all their work in getting these issues online.

All the Best,

Michele Hayslett

For the Communications Committee

Data Viz Position at UNC at Chapel Hill

Topic:

Please see the announcement below for a new position created here in the Libraries at UNC at Chapel Hill.  It will be based in our Digital Research Services Department (you’d get to work with me and a bunch of other great people!) supporting the mission of our Research Hub in Davis Library.  Note that there is a requirement for an advanced degree, but a master’s or PhD in a related subject field is admissible in place of a library degree.  Please let me know if I can answer any questions.

Michele Hayslett

michele_hayslett@unc.edu

======================

Data Visualization Services Librarian

Available: March 1, 2016

UNC Chapel Hill invites applications for the position of Data Visualization Services Librarian in the Digital Research Services department. Based in the Davis Library Research Hub, the Data Visualization Services Librarian is responsible for expanding data analysis and visualization services in support of teaching and research.

The Data Visualization Services Librarian:

  • Advises, consults, instructs, and serves as technical lead on data visualization projects with UNC students and faculty from all academic disciplines.
  • Identifies, evaluates and recommends new and emerging digital research tools for the Libraries and UNC research community.
  • Develops and supports visualization services in response to current trends, campus needs and Libraries priorities.
  • Shares ideas and concepts effectively across diverse interdisciplinary audiences and serves as the point person for data visualization and analysis efforts in the Libraries.
  • Develops relationships with campus units supporting digital research, including the Odum Institute for Research in Social Science.

The Data Visualization Services Librarian works with staff from the Digital Research Services and Library Information & Technology departments to identify hardware and software needs, and to develop scalable, sustainable practices related to data visualization services. The librarian designs and delivers workshops and training sessions on data visualization tools and methods, and develops a range of instructional materials to support patrons with data visualization needs.

The Data Visualization Services Librarian may share some program coordination responsibilities with other Research Hub staff and may supervise student employees.

Qualifications

Required

  • ALA-accredited master’s degree in Library or Information Science OR advanced degree in Geography, Sociology, Psychology, Design, Informatics, Statistics, or a related field.
  • Demonstrated experience with data visualization tools and programming libraries.
  • Proficiency with at least one programming language (such as Python, Ruby, JavaScript, Java, R).
  • Ability to use a variety of tools to extract and manipulate data from various sources (such as relational databases, XML, web services and APIs).
  • Demonstrated technical expertise and experience using technology to support research and teaching.
  • Experience providing instruction or research consultations.
  • Strong communication and interpersonal skills.
  • Strong commitment to public service.

Preferred

Experience working effectively with a team to plan and complete projects.

  • Background working in a large academic library.
  • Experience supporting data analysis and visualization in a research setting.
  • Proficiency using tools and programming libraries to support text analysis.
  • Familiarity with geospatial technology.
  • Experience identifying and recommending new tools or technologies.
  • Graphic design skills and proficiency using relevant software.

The University and The Libraries

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is the country’s oldest state university. UNC Chapel Hill has an enrollment of approximately 29,000 students, employs more than 3,500 members of the faculty, and offers 69 doctoral degrees as well as professional degrees in dentistry, medicine, pharmacy and law. The UNC Health Sciences Library is a recognized leader within the Association of Academic Health Science Libraries.  University Library collections include over 6.5 million volumes. The Library is a member of the Association of Research Libraries and the Center for Research Libraries. Together with the libraries at Duke University, North Carolina Central University, and North Carolina State University, the members of the Triangle Research Libraries Network (TRLN) provide services and collections to their students, faculty, and staff in support of the education, research, and service missions of the universities.

The University Library invests proudly in its employees, strives to create a diverse environment of respect and collaboration, and encourages vision and innovation.

The Region

The Triangle region is one of the most desirable places to live and work in North America and offers its residents a wide array of recreational, cultural, and intellectual activities. The mountains or the seashore are less than half day’s drive from Chapel Hill.

The University of North Carolina is an equal opportunity employer and is strongly committed to the diversity of our faculty and staff.

Salary and Benefits

This is twelve-month academic librarian appointment.  Salary is commensurate with qualifications and experience. Standard state benefits of annual leave, sick leave, and State or optional retirement plan.

Deadline for Application

Review of applications will begin on February 11, 2016. Applications will be accepted until the position is filled, but preference will be given to applications received by the begin review date.

To Apply

Please visit http://unc.peopleadmin.com/postings/90462 and complete the online application. Please include a letter of application, a resume and the name, mailing address, email address, and telephone number of three professional references, one of whom must be a current supervisor.  Additionally, please indicate in your cover letter where you first learned of this position.

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is an equal opportunity employer that welcomes all to apply, including protected veterans and individuals with disabilities.

======================

IASSIST Fellows Program 2015-16

The IASSIST Fellows Program is pleased to announce that it is now accepting applications for financial support to attend the IASSIST 2016 conference in Bergen [http://iassist2016.org/] from data professionals who are developing, supporting and managing data infrastructures at their home institutions.

Please be aware that funding is not intended to cover the entire cost of attending the conference. The applicant's home institution must provide some level of financial support to supplement an IASSIST Fellow award. Strong preference will be given to first time participants and applicants from those countries currently with insufficient representation at IASSIST. Only fully completed applications will be considered. Applicants submitting a paper for the conference will be given priority consideration for funding.

You may apply for funding via this form<http://tinyurl.com/jsutx9z>. The deadline for applications is the 31st of January 2016.

For more information, to apply for funding or nominate a person for a Fellowship, please send an email to the Fellows Committee chairs, Florio Arguillas (foa2@cornell.edu) and Stuart Macdonald (stuart.macdonald@ed.ac.uk)

All best wishes
Stuart Macdonald & Florio Arguillas

IQ double issue 38(4)/39(1) is up, and so is vol 39(2)!

Hi folks!  A lovely gift for your reading pleasure over the holidays, we present two, yes, TWO issues of the IASSIST Quarterly.  The first is the double issue, 38(4)/39(1) with guest editors, Joachim Wacherow of GESIS – Leibniz Institute for the Social Sciences in Germany and Mary Vardigan of ICPSR at the University of Michigan, USA.  This issue focuses on the Data Documentation Initiative (DDI) and how it makes meta-analysis possible.  The second issue is 39(2), and is all about data:  avoiding statistical disclosure, using data, and improving digital preservation.  Although we usually post the full text of the Editor's Notes in the blog post, it seems lengthy to do that for both issues.  You will find them, though, on the web site: the Editor's Notes for the double issue, and the Editor's Notes for issue 39(2).

Michele Hayslett, for the IQ Publications Committee

  • IASSIST Quarterly

    Publications Special issue: A pioneer data librarian
    Welcome to the special volume of the IASSIST Quarterly (IQ (37):1-4, 2013). This special issue started as exchange of ideas between Libbie Stephenson and Margaret Adams to collect

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  • Resources

    Resources

    A space for IASSIST members to share professional resources useful to them in their daily work. Also the IASSIST Jobs Repository for an archive of data-related position descriptions. more...

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    Find out what IASSISTers are doing in the field and explore other avenues of presentation, communication and discussion via social networking and related online social spaces. more...