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2016 IASSIST Fellowships

The IASSIST Fellows Committee are pleased to announce that we will be awarding an IASSIST Fellowship award for the 2016 conference to the following recipients:

Marijana Glavica - Systems Librarian, University of Zagreb, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, Croatia

'As a systems librarian I work with bibliographic data and manage library automation systems. I am also involved in designing library policies and procedures. As a subject specialist I provide information services to psychology professors and students, and I teach a course about information resources in psychology. In the last few years I started to work towards establishment of data archive and services for the social sciences in Croatia, an effort supported by SERSCIDA project in the past and currently by two ongoing projects - SEEDS and CESSDA-SaW.'

Dr Bhojaraju Gunjal - Head of Central Library, National Institute of Technology Rourkela, India

'I am serving as Head, Central Library (Deputy Librarian) of our institute library since August, 2014. In this capacity, I am responsible for management of the Biju Patnaik Central Library of this institute which employs 33 people including library staff, trainees, support staff and has an annual budget of over Rs. 6 Crores.

Our library manages institutional repositories using the DSpace and e-Prints tools with a number of new initiatives  under progress such as integrating ORCID with all our repositories, research data management, etc.  In this regard, programs like IASSIST will definitely help in managing our data repositories in much more effective way.

The library also provides special services by implementing state-of-the-art technologies in various initiatives such as Research data management, Liaison Program, Migration of library software to Open Source tools, Integration of Bio-metric with RFID, Mobile Apps including SMS/email alerts, QR Code, Knowledge Management aspects, Discovery Services, etc. for our library.

I will use this acquired knowledge through the Fellows program for the development of our library data repositories in developing, supporting and managing data infrastructures for our users and help other fellow colleagues in implementing the same in other libraries of India.'

Shima Moradisomehsaraei - Lecturer, Tehran Medical University & Azad University, Iran

'I teach information science and Information technology related courses to library , Medical Information system and Medical bioinformatic students. This means I teach students on how to use softwares to manage,correct and analysis data and how to design models and graphs. Teaching on the "indexing and retrieving" course we work on big data and linked data issues. I also teach on another related course "medical information systems" which I discusses big data and how it influences medical data of the whole society.'

Ya-Chi Lin, Data Specialist, Survey Research Data Archive, Academia Sinica, Taiwan

'Our institution, Survey Research Data Archive (SRDA) is an electronic library of the largest collection of digital data in social sciences in Taiwan. Part of my work entails is to promote SRDA and help SRDA members to use data to conduct secondary data analysis. I go to the campus and launch webinars to introduce the academic survey data and government survey data, and the enquiry service of SRDA to potential users.'

We would like to welcome our fellows into the IASSIST community and we're sure that they'll be made to feel at home by all IASSIST members at our forthcoming conference in Bergen, Norway.

Stuart Macdonald & Florio Arguillas (Chairs of IASSIST Fellows Committee)

IASSIST Fellows Program 2015-16

The IASSIST Fellows Program is pleased to announce that it is now accepting applications for financial support to attend the IASSIST 2016 conference in Bergen [http://iassist2016.org/] from data professionals who are developing, supporting and managing data infrastructures at their home institutions.

Please be aware that funding is not intended to cover the entire cost of attending the conference. The applicant's home institution must provide some level of financial support to supplement an IASSIST Fellow award. Strong preference will be given to first time participants and applicants from those countries currently with insufficient representation at IASSIST. Only fully completed applications will be considered. Applicants submitting a paper for the conference will be given priority consideration for funding.

You may apply for funding via this form<http://tinyurl.com/jsutx9z>. The deadline for applications is the 31st of January 2016.

For more information, to apply for funding or nominate a person for a Fellowship, please send an email to the Fellows Committee chairs, Florio Arguillas (foa2@cornell.edu) and Stuart Macdonald (stuart.macdonald@ed.ac.uk)

All best wishes
Stuart Macdonald & Florio Arguillas

New IQ now available!

Editor notes: 

Data, the whole Data, and nothing but the Data … and the Metadata, and the Access to Data

Welcome to the third issue of volume 38 of the IASSIST Quarterly (IQ 38:3, 2014). This issue is unquestionably about data. There are three papers on projects for improving delivery of data to users.

The first paper is ‘Distributing Access to Data, not Data’ by David Schiller from the Institute for Employment Research (IAB) at Nuremberg (Germany) and Richard Welpton at UK Data Archive, University of Essex (UK). They focus on the problem that access to European microdata for researchers is restricted by national borders and the barriers for performing comparative analyses between the member states. The ‘Data without Boundaries’ project now has an initiative to build a ‘European Remote Access Network’ (EuRAN). The problem is that prevention of identifying respondents in the microdata conflicts with the importance for modern research methods of access to detailed data. Some control is necessary and the paper describes remote access as the appropriate answer in the forms of job submission, remote execution, and remote desktop. As an example, one version of secure remote desktop access encrypts pictures of the desktop screens to make secure the transport over the Internet. The authors reference a set of principles for access, e.g., that it is not desirable to physically move data and that access should come through a single point that can access multiple sources of data. The researchers’ need to analyse the data is supported by a ‘Virtual Research Environment’ that includes software for generating and presenting results through the EuRAN project.

The next paper presents a two-year metadata project based upon two well-known series of studies: the American National Election Study (ANES) and the US General Social Survey (GSS). The goal is to improve their metadata and build demonstration tools to illustrate the value of structured, machine-actionable metadata as reported in ‘Creating Rich, Structured Metadata: Lessons Learned in the Metadata Portal Project’. The authors are Mary Vardigan (Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR)), Darrell Donakowski (American National Election Studies (ANES), University of Michigan), Pascal Heus (Metadata Technology North America (MTNA)), Sanda Ionescu (ICPSR), and Julia Rotondo (NORC at University of Chicago). The article reports on their experiences, and also includes recommendations. The National Science Foundation funded the project under the ‘Metadata for Long-standing Large-Scale Social Science Surveys’ (META-SSS) program. ICPSR and ANES are co-distributors of most of the ANES studies while the GSS is co-distributed by NORC, the Roper Center, and ICPSR. In the project metadata tools revealed small differences between supposed identical datasets, for instance in study titles, variable names, etc. The project also decided which types of content to include. Both of the the series are huge collections - as the 58 ANES surveys contain 79,521 variables and the cumulative GSS has 5,558 variables. Marking up this legacy documentation is laborious and time-intensive and the future naturally lies in capturing the metadata at the source. In conclusion, the project learned a great deal about converting legacy documentation and identified several steps for documentation development, including the areas of paradata and versions of datasets. The concept of versions of datasets relates to the solution described in the first paper of not bringing data but access to data to the users.

The third paper demonstrates further work in the project described above. In the paper ‘Mapping the General Social Survey to the Generic Statistical Business Process Model: NORC’s Experience’ the three authors - Scot Ausborn, Julia Rotondo, and Tim Mulcahy – all from NORC at the University of Chicago - present how they carried out the mapping of the GSS workflow to the Generic Statistical Business Process Model (GSBPM). An analysis of the business processes for the production of survey data was carried out with the intention of direct capture of survey cycle DDI-based metadata, thus avoiding the need to generate it retroactively. The work is based upon an internal survey of GSS staff, asking them to explicate their respective roles on the survey in terms of the GSBPM. Connecting aspects of the GSS workflow to elements of the GSBPM produced a comprehensive and integrative view of the individual efforts that together produce the survey. Of the lessons learned, I noticed that they later found that it may have been more fruitful to have held a workshop in which GSS staff could discuss the workflow processes together, rather than having a survey with each person providing his or her input in isolation. They mention that they think an expert in GSBPM could have conducted the mapping of the workflow; however they did identify points for improvement in the workflow relating to both metadata and paradata.

Articles for the IASSIST Quarterly are always very welcome. They can be papers from IASSIST conferences or other conferences and workshops, from local presentations or papers especially written for the IQ. When you are preparing a presentation, give a thought to turning your one-time presentation into a lasting contribution to continuing development. As an author you are permitted ‘deep links’ where you link directly to your paper published in the IQ. Chairing a conference session with the purpose of aggregating and integrating papers for a special issue IQ is also much appreciated as the information reaches many more people than the session participants, and will be readily available on the IASSIST website at http://www.iassistdata.org.

Authors are very welcome to take a look at the instructions and layout:http://iassistdata.org/iq/instructions-authors.

Authors can also contact me via e-mail: kbr@sam.sdu.dk. Should you be interested in compiling a special issue for the IQ as guest editor(s) I will also be delighted to hear from you.


Karsten Boye Rasmussen
March 2015
Editor

New 'Special Issue' IQ now available!

Editor’s notes

Special issue: A pioneer data librarian

Welcome to the special volume of the IASSIST Quarterly (IQ (37):1-4, 2013). This special issue started as exchange of ideas between Libbie Stephenson and Margaret Adams to collect papers relating to the work of Sue A. Dodd. Margaret Adams (Peggy) acted as the guest editor and the background and content of this volume is described in her preface to this volume on the following page. As editor I want to especially thank Peggy and Libbie for pursuing and finalizing their excellent idea. I also want to thank all the authors that contributed to produce this volume. As one of the authors I can witness that Peggy did a great job.

Articles for the IASSIST Quarterly are always very welcome. They can be papers from IASSIST conferences or other conferences and workshops, from local presentations or papers especially written for the IQ. When you are preparing a presentation, give a thought to turning your one-time presentation into a lasting contribution to continuing development. As an author you are permitted “deep links” where you link directly to your paper published in the IQ. Chairing a conference session with the purpose of aggregating and integrating papers for a special issue IQ is also much appreciated as the information reaches many more people than the session participants, and will be readily available on the IASSIST website at http://www.iassistdata.org.

Authors are very welcome to take a look at the instructions and layout:
http://iassistdata.org/iq/instructions-authors

Authors can also contact me via e-mail: kbr@sam.sdu.dk. Should you be interested in compiling a special issue for the IQ as guest editor(s) I will also be delighted to hear from you.

 

Karsten Boye Rasmussen

April 2014

Editor

New IASSIST Quarterly now available!

Editor’s notes

Special issue: The organizational dimension of  digital preservation

Welcome to the special double issue 3 & 4 of the IASSIST Quarterly (IQ) volume 36 (2012). This special issue addresses the organizational dimension of digital preservation as it was presented and discussed at the IASSIST conference in May 2013 in Cologne, Germany.

The two guest editors Astrid Recker and Natascha Schumann from the GESIS Leibniz Institute for the Social Sciences in Cologne have earned special thanks. If you find their names familiar it is because they co-wrote a paper in the IQ 36-2. They are concerned with data preservation and curation at the Data Archive for the Social Sciences, and as a member of the Archive and Data Management Training Center, Astrid also trains others in these areas. Furthermore, they co-chaired the  panel on ‘Beyond Bits and Bytes: the Organizational Dimension of Digital Preservation’ at IASSIST 2013, both also participating as panelists in the session. They have now persuaded the other panelists to contribute to this combined special issue. Thanks also therefore to Michelle Lindlar, Stefan Strathmann and Achim Oßwald, and Yvonne Friese.

Articles for the IASSIST Quarterly are always very welcome. They can be papers from IASSIST conferences or other conferences and workshops, from local presentations or papers especially written for the IQ. Authors are permitted “deep links” where you link directly to your paper published in the IQ. Chairing a conference session with the purpose of aggregating and integrating papers for a special issue IQ is also much appreciated as the information reaches many more people than the session participants, and will be readily available on the IASSIST website at http://www.iassistdata.org.

Authors are very welcome to take a look at the instructions and layout:http://iassistdata.org/iq/instructions-authors.
Authors can also contact me via e-mail: kbr@sam.sdu.dk.

Should you be interested in compiling a special issue for the IQ as guest editor(s) I will also be delighted to hear from you.

Karsten Boye Rasmussen

January 2014

Editor

IASSIST Fellows Program 2013-14

The IASSIST Fellows Program is pleased to announce that it is now accepting applications for financial support to attend the IASSIST 2014 conference in Toronto [http://www.library.yorku.ca/cms/iassist/], from data professionals who are developing, supporting and managing data infrastructures at their home institutions.

Please be aware that funding is not intended to cover the entire cost of attending the conference. The applicant’s home institution must provide some level of financial support to supplement an IASSIST Fellow award. Strong preference will be given to first time participants and applicants from those countries currently with insufficient representation at IASSIST. Only fully completed applications will be considered. Applicants submitting a paper for the conference will be given priority consideration for funding.

You may apply for funding via this form.The deadline for applications is the 31st of January 2014.

For more information, to apply for funding or nominate a person for a Fellowship, please send an email to the Fellows Committee chairs, Luis Martínez-Uribe (
lmartinez@march.es) and Stuart Macdonald (srm262@cornell.edu).

New IASSIST Quarterly now available!

Editor notes: 

Data bring maps, archive brings data, and accreditation brings research

This issue (volume 36-1, 2012) of the IASSIST Quarterly (IQ) is the first of the 2012 issues. This editorial is written in March 2013 when many IASSIST people have received acceptance for their papers at the upcoming conference IASSIST 2013 in Cologne. I am certain there will be many interesting presentations at the conference. However, presenters can reach a greater audience by having their paper published in forthcoming issues of the IQ.

The three papers in this issue bring reports on the presentation and availability of data in a geographical portal for geospatial data, the collection and dissemination of holdings in a data archive, and on access to trans-national data and the accreditation involved.

The first paper is Scholars GeoPortal: A new platform for geospatial data discovery, exploration and access in Ontario universities. The authors are Elizabeth Hill and Leanne Trimble (formerly Hindmarch) of University of Western Ontario and Scholars Portal, Toronto. The paper was presented at the IASSIST 2011 conference Data Science Professionals: A Global Community of Sharing at Simon Fraser University and the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, in the session Power of Partnerships in Data Creation and Sharing. Sharing was the theme for the conference, the session, and certainly also the paper on the Scholars GeoPortal. Data collections are no longer only numeric data collections. This paper focuses on the use of geospatial data for learning, reporting a project carried out for universities in the province of Ontario on the initiative of the Ontario Council of University Libraries (OCUL). The paper describes the background - the need and the vision - and the components of the Geospatial Portal Project. The project needs to have very good metadata handling in order to provide valid results and the paper demonstrates how the GeoPortal presents the various different types of data. The portal is also used for research and has further involved policy makers and legal experts.

The second paper was presented at the IASSIST 2012 conference Data Science for a Connected World: Unlocking and Harnessing the Power of Information in Washington, DC hosted by NORC. In the session National Data Landscapes: Policies, Strategies, and Contrasts, the paper Strategies of Promoting the Use of Survey Research Data Archive was presented by the Meng-Li Yang from the Center For Survey Research, RCHSS, Academia Sinica, in Taiwan. The paper is a report from the largest data archive in Asia: the Survey Research Data Archive, Taiwan, whose collection includes government statistics raw data. The data archive was established in 1994 and now has 1400 members who can draw on the facilities of the archive including direct downloading of datasets. In 2011 a survey showed that about 20% of a relevant group of researchers were members of the data archive. This result and other findings led to strategies on improving the search facility and active promotion of the service. The paper goes into details on the tasks that were necessary to improve the search facility. These details and other observations and experiences are provided for others in the data archive arena.

Paola Tubaro, University of Greenwich and CNRS has, with Marie Cros, Université de Lille and Roxane Silberman, CNRS - Réseau Quetelet, written the paper Access to official data and researcher accreditation in Europe: existing barriers and a way forward. The authors perceive that the barriers against trans-national access to data in Europe are based upon accreditation and that there are major inconsistencies across the countries. One obvious barrier is that some descriptions are available only in the national language, other barriers are at the policy-level and will require negotiation and coordination. The paper presents the information collected on European accreditation procedures based on the trio: eligibility, application, and service. Accreditation is found to involve the criteria of eligibility (who is a researcher etc.), the procedure of application (how to request access etc.), and the level of service (who approves applications etc.). This work is part of the Data without Boundaries project in the EC 7th Framework. The positive conclusion is that almost all European countries provide research access to micro-data, enabled by the Open Data movement and other factors. But there still remain areas where improvement is needed for better trans-national data access.

Articles for the IASSIST Quarterly are always very welcome. They can be papers from IASSIST conferences or other conferences and workshops, from local presentations or papers especially written for the IQ. Authors are permitted “deep links” where you link directly to your paper published in the IQ. Chairing a conference session with the purpose of aggregating and integrating papers for a special issue IQ is also much appreciated as the information reaches many more people than the session participants, and will be readily available on the IASSIST website at http://www.iassistdata.org.

Authors are very welcome to take a look at the instructions and layout:
http://iassistdata.org/iq/instructions-authors.

Authors can also contact me via e-mail: kbr@sam.sdu.dk. Should you be interested in compiling a special issue for the IQ as guest editor(s) I will also be delighted to hear from you.

Karsten Boye Rasmussen

March 2013

Editor

IASSIST Fellows Application Form 2013

The IASSIST Fellows Program is pleased to announce that it is now accepting applications for financial support to attend the IASSIST 2013 conference in Cologne [http://www.iassist2013.org/], from data professionals who are developing, supporting and managing data infrastructures at their home institutions.

It should be noted that funding is not intended to cover the entire cost of attending the conference and that the applicant’s home institution must provide some level of financial support to supplement an IASSIST Fellow award. Strong preference will be given to first time participants and applicants from those countries currently with insufficient representation at IASSIST. Only fully completed applications will be considered. Applicants submitting a paper for the conference will be given priority consideration for funding.

You may apply for funding via this form.The deadline for applications is the 31st of January 2013.

For more information, to apply for funding or nominate a person for a Fellowship, please send an email to the Fellows Committee Co-chairs, Luis Martínez-Uribe (lmartinez@march.es) and Stuart Macdonald (stuart.macdonald@ed.ac.uk).

If you need further information please let us know
Best wishes,

Luis Martinez-Uribe and Stuart Macdonald
IASSIST Fellows Committee Co-chairs

IASSIST Quarterly (2011: Fall)

Sharing data and building information

With this issue (volume 35-3, 2011) of the IASSIST Quarterly (IQ) we return to the regular format of a collection of articles not within the same specialist subject area as we have seen in recent special issues of IQ. Naturally the three articles presented here are related to the IQ subject area in general, as in: assisting research with data, acquiring data from research, and making good use of the user community. This last topic could also be spelled “involvement”. The hope is that these articles will carry involvement to the IASSIST community, so that the gained knowledge can be shared and practised widely.


“Mind the gap” is a caveat to passengers on the London Underground. The authors of this article are Susan Noble, Celia Russell and Richard Wiseman, all affiliated with ESDS-International hosted by Mimas at the University of Manchester in the UK. The ESDS, standing for “Economic and Social Data Service”, are extending their reach beyond the UK. In the article “Mind the Gap: Global Data Sharing” they are looking into how today’s research on the important topics of climate change, economic crises, migration and health requires cross-national data sharing. Clearly these topics are international (e.g. the weather or air pollution does not stop at national borders), but the article discusses how existing barriers prevent global data sharing. The paper is based on a presentation in a session on “Sharing data: High Rewards, Formidable Barriers” at the IASSIST 2009 conference. It is demonstrated how even international data produced by intergovernmental organizations like the International Monetary Fund, the International Energy Agency, OECD, the United Nations and the World Bank are often only available with an expensive subscription, presented in complex incomprehensible tables, through special interfaces; such barriers are making the international use of the data difficult. Because of missing metadata standards it is difficult to evaluate the quality of the dataset and to search for and locate the data resources required. The paper highlights the development of e-learning materials that can raise awareness and ease access to international data. In this case the example is e-learning for the “United Nations Millennium Development Goals”.


The second paper is also related to the sharing of data with an introduction to the international level. “The Research-Data-Centre in Research-Data-Centre Approach: A First Step Towards Decentralised International Data Sharing” is written by Stefan Bender and Jörg Heining from the Institute for Employment Research (IAB) in Nuremberg, Germany. In order to preserve the confidentiality of single entities, access to complete datasets is often restricted to monitored on-site analysis. Although off-site access is facilitated in other countries, Germany has relied on on-site security. However, an opportunity has been presented where Research Data Centre sites are placed at Statistical Offices around Germany, and also at a Michigan centre for demography. The article contains historical information on approaches and developments in other countries and has a special focus on the German solution. The project will gain experience in the complex balance between confidentiality and analysis, and the differences between national laws.


The paper by Stuart Macdonald from EDINA in Scotland originated as a poster session at the IASSIST 2010 conference. The name of the paper is “AddressingHistory: a Web2.0 community engagement tool and API”. The community consists of members within and outside academia, as local history groups and genealogists are using the software to enhance and combine data from historical Scottish Post Office Directories with large-scale historical maps. The background and technical issues are presented in the paper, which also looks into issues and perspectives of user generated content. The “crowdsourcing” tool did successfully generate engagement and there are plans for further development, such as upload and attachment of photos of people, buildings, and landmarks to enrich the collection.

Articles for the IQ are always very welcome. They can be papers from IASSIST conferences or other conferences and workshops, from local presentations or papers especially written for the IQ. If you don’t have anything to offer right now, then please prepare yourself for the next IASSIST conference and start planning for participation in a session there. Chairing a conference session with the purpose of aggregating and integrating papers for a special issue IQ is much appreciated as the information in the form of an IQ issue reaches many more people than the session participants and will be readily available on the IASSIST website at http://www.iassistdata.org.

Authors are very welcome to take a look at the instructions and layout:
http://iassistdata.org/iq/instructions-authors


Authors can also contact me via e-mail: kbr@sam.sdu.dk. Should you be interested in compiling a special issue for the IQ as guest editor(s) I will also be delighted to hear from you.

 

Karsten Boye Rasmussen

December 2011

Open Data Fellowships at University of Michigan

Students with research interests in scientific data management, sharing and reuse have a unique opportunity to participate in the Open Data fellowship program. Open Data is an Integrative Graduate Education and Research Traineeship (IGERT) sponsored by NSF. Open Data fellows engage in a vibrant set of research activities at the University of Michigan in the conduct of responsible data-intensive science and engineering involving faculty and doctoral students from SI, Computer Science and Engineering, Bioinformatics, Materials Science, and Chemical Engineering. more...

  • IASSIST Quarterly

    Publications Special issue: A pioneer data librarian
    Welcome to the special volume of the IASSIST Quarterly (IQ (37):1-4, 2013). This special issue started as exchange of ideas between Libbie Stephenson and Margaret Adams to collect

    more...

  • Resources

    Resources

    A space for IASSIST members to share professional resources useful to them in their daily work. Also the IASSIST Jobs Repository for an archive of data-related position descriptions. more...

  • community

    • LinkedIn
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    • Twitter

    Find out what IASSISTers are doing in the field and explore other avenues of presentation, communication and discussion via social networking and related online social spaces. more...