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Special Issue of International Journal of Librarianship: Data Librarianship

[Posted on behalf of Kristi Thompson]

The special issue of the International Journal of Librarianship on Data Librarianship I guest edited has been published. One feature in particular that might be of interest to IASSISTers is an article in which we interviewed a number of people who had prominent and interesting careers in the field and asked them to share their thoughts on how data services have changes over the course of their careers, as well as advice for newbies.

Our interviewees include IASSIST President Tuomas J. Alaterä, as well as Ann Green, Guangjing Li (China), Jian Qin, Wendy Watkins, and Lynn Woolfrey. Hopefully it will help spread the IASSIST word to some audiences we don't always reach! (Readership for this journal is largely in Asia so far.)

Article (open access): https://doi.org/10.23974/ijol.2017.vol2.1.35

Other articles and book reviews will also be of interest. Table of contents:

http://ojs.calaijol.org/index.php/ijol/issue/view/3

Kristi Thompson

Winner announced for first IASSIST Paper Competition

Dear IASSIST Members,

In our call for this year's conference we included a new Paper Track that would require members to submit a full paper in advance of the conference. We also created a best paper competition as an incentive to submit. I have the pleasure to announce a winner of our first IASSIST Paper Competition!

The winning paper was "Sustainability of Social Science Data Archives: A Historical Network Perspective” by Kristin R. Eschenfelder, Morgaine Gilchrist Scott, Kalpana Shankar, Ellen LeClere, Rebecca Lin, and Greg Downey. Kristin as lead author will receive a free registration for a future IASSIST conference, and the entire team will be recognized at the IASSIST Business Meeting on Wednesday, June 3 at 4:45-5:15. The paper stood out for its fit with the conference theme, relevance to IASSIST Quarterly, and research design.

We have all submitted conference papers available on our website as a way to encourage feedback from attendees (https://sites.google.com/a/umn.edu/iassist-2015/paper-submissions). Every paper will be considered for publication in IQ.

A big IASSIST thanks to our authors for helping us kick off a potentially new tradition. Also, thank you to the sub-committee members (Karen Hogenboom, Thomas Lindsay, Sara Holder, Michelle Edwards, and Berenica Vejvoda) for the hard work to select a winner.

They are helping to make IASSIST 2015 the best conference ever!  See you all soon!

Lynda & Sam
Program Committee Co-Chairs

Lynda M. Kellam Data Services & Government Information Librarian Adjunct Lecturer in Political Science University of NC at Greensboro

IASSIST election results, 2015

Hello IASSISTers!

Here are the official results of the 2015 IASSIST elections.  There was a 61% voter turnout.  The winning candidates are:

President: Tuomas Alaterä

Vice President: Jen Green

Secretary: Ryan Womack

Africa Regional Secretary: Lynn Woolfrey

Asia-Pacific Regional  Secretary: Sam Spencer

Canada Regional Secretary: Carol Perry

Europe Regional Secretary: David Schiller

USA Regional Secretary: San Cannon

AC Member, Canada: Berenica Vejvoda

AC Members, Europe: Oliver Watteler and Arne Wolters

AC Members, USA: Kate McNeill, Jen Darragh, and Ashley Jester

Many, many thanks to all candidates who agreed to stand, and congratulations to our new officers.  Newly elected officers’ terms officially begin at the end of the Annual Business Meeting of the Association at the 41st Annual IASSIST conference in Minneapolis, but they are welcome to attend the Administrative Committee meeting preceding the conference as observers if they so wish.

Melanie Wright

Chair, IASSIST Nominations and Elections Committee

Version 4, Research Data Curation Bibliography & the IQ

Another reason to write for the IQ: you might get yourself into Charles Bailey's prestigious bibliography, at

http://digital-scholarship.org/rdcb/rdcb.htm

I'm pleased to see no less than 7 IQ articles in the latest version. I didn’t count IASSISTers who published elsewhere but several of those were in the list as well.

Research Data Curation Bibliography

Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

Houston: Digital Scholarship

Version 4: 6/23/2014

Altman, Micah, and Mercè Crosas. "The Evolution of Data Citation: From Principles to Implementation" IASSIST Quarterly 37, no. 1-4 (2013): 62-70. http://www.iassistdata.org/iq/evolution-data-citation-principles-implementation

Bender, Stefam, and Jorg Heining. "The Research-Data-Centre in Research-Data-Centre Approach: A First Step towards Decentralised International Data Sharing." IASSIST Quarterly 35, no. 3 (2011): 10-16. http://www.iassistdata.org/iq/research-data-centre-research-data-centre-approach-first-step-towards-decentralised-international

Mooney, Hailey. "A Practical Approach to Data Citation: The Special Interest Group on Data Citation and Development of the Quick Guide to Data Citation." IASSIST Quarterly 37, 1-4 (2013): 71-77. http://iassistdata.org/iq/practical-approach-data-citation-special-interest-group-data-citation-and-development-quick-guide

 Ribeiro, Cristina, Maria Eugénia, and Matos Fernandes. "Data Curation at U. Porto: Identifying Current Practices across Disciplinary Domains." IASSIST Quarterly 35, no. 4 (2011): 14-17. http://www.iassistdata.org/iq/data-curation-uporto-identifying-current-practices-across-disciplinary-domains

 Schumann, Natascha. "Tried and Trusted: Experiences with Certification Processes at the GESIS Data Archive." IASSIST Quarterly 36, no. 3/4 (2012): 24-27. http://www.iassistdata.org/iq/tried-and-trusted-experiences-certification-processes-gesis-data-archive-0.

 Schumann, Natascha, and Astrid Recker. "De-mystifying OAIS compliance: Benefits and challenges of mapping the OAIS reference model to the GESIS Data Archive." IASSIST Quarterly 36, no. 2 (2012): 6-11. http://www.iassistdata.org/iq/de-mystifying-oais-compliance-benefits-and-challenges-mapping-oais-reference-model-gesis-data-arc

 Yoon, Ayoung, and Helen Tibbo. "Examination of Data Deposit Practices in Repositories with the OAIS Model." IASSIST Quarterly 35, no. 4 (2011): 6-13. http://www.iassistdata.org/downloads/iqvol35_tibbo.pdf

 Congratulations to the authors.

Robin Rice, IASSIST Web Editor

White Paper Urges New Approaches to Assure Access to Scientific Data

Press release posted on behalf of Mark Thompson-Kolar, ICPSR.

12/12/2013:  (Ann Arbor, MI)—More than two dozen data repositories serving the social, natural, and physical sciences today released a white paper recommending new approaches to funding sharing and preservation of scientific data. The document emphasizes the need for sustainable funding of domain repositories—data archives with ties to specific scientific communities.

“Sustaining Domain Repositories for Digital Data: A White Paper,” is an outcome of a meeting convened June 24-25, 2013, in Ann Arbor. The meeting, organized by the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR) and supported by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, was attended by representatives of 22 data repositories from a wide spectrum of scientific disciplines.

Domain repositories accelerate intellectual discovery by facilitating data reuse and reproducibility. They leverage in-depth subject knowledge as well as expertise in data curation to make data accessible and meaningful to specific scientific communities. However, domain repositories face an uncertain financial future in the United States, as funding remains unpredictable and inadequate. Unlike our European competitors who support data archiving as necessary scientific infrastructure, the US does not assure the long-term viability of data archives.

“This white paper aims to start a conversation with funding agencies about how secure and sustainable funding can be provided for domain repositories,” said ICPSR Director George Alter. “We’re suggesting ways that modifications in US funding agencies’ policies can help domain repositories to achieve their mission.”

Five recommendations are offered to encourage data stewardship and support sustainable repositories: 

  •  Commit to sustaining institutions that assure the long-term preservation and viability of research data
  • Promote cooperation among funding agencies, universities, domain repositories, journals, and other stakeholders 
  •  Support the human and organizational infrastructure for data stewardship as well as the hardware
  •  Establish review criteria appropriate for data repositories
  • Incentivize Principal Investigators (PIs) to archive data

While a single funding model may not fit all disciplines, new approaches are urgently needed, the paper says.

“What’s really remarkable about this effort—the meeting and the resulting white paper—has been the consensus across disciplines from astronomy to archaeology to proteomics,” Alter said. “More than two dozen domain repositories from so many disciplines are saying the same thing: Data sharing can produce more science, but data stewards must know the needs of their scientific communities.”

This white paper is a must read for anyone who wants to understand the role of scientific domain repositories and their critical role in the advancement of science. It can be downloaded at http://datacommunity.icpsr.umich.edu

 

The Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR), based in Ann Arbor, MI, is the largest archive of behavioral and social science research data in the world. It advances research by acquiring, curating, preserving, and distributing original research data. www.icpsr.umich.edu

The Alfred P. Sloan Foundation is a philanthropic, not-for-profit grantmaking institution based in New York City. Established in 1934, the Foundation makes grants in support of original research and education in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and economic performance. www.sloan.org

###

IASSIST 2014 Call for Papers

ALIGNING DATA AND RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURE
IASSIST 2014 Annual Conference Call for Paper and Session Proposals

This year’s conference theme touches upon the international and interdisciplinary requirements of aligning data and research infrastructure. The 2013 OECD Global Science Forum report on New Data for Understanding the Human Condition identifies key challenges for international data collaboration that beg for new solutions. Among these challenges is the mounting pressure for new forms of social science data. In today’s abundance of personal data, new methods are being sought to combine traditional social science data (administrative, survey, and census data) with new forms of personal data (social networking, biomarkers or transaction data) or with data from other domains. Similarly, the need for open data, archiving, and long-term curation infrastructures has been identified for research data in the natural, physical, and life sciences. Funders in all areas are pushing to enable the replication and/or reuse of research data. What alignments are needed between data and research infrastructure to enable these possibilities?

The international research community is in the midst of building a global data ecosystem that consists of a mixture of domain data repositories, data archives, data libraries, and data services and that seeks ways to facilitate data discovery, integration, access, and preservation. Evidence of this transformation is found in the recently established ICSU World Data System and in the Research Data Alliance. Like IASSIST, these organisations are contributing to the development of a global data ecosystem. Alignment or unification of strategies must take place at many levels to achieve this. How do we proceed? What advancements are needed in research data management, research infrastructure, and the development of new expertise?

Conference Tracks

We welcome submissions on the theme outlined above and encourage conference participants to propose papers and sessions that will be of interest to a diverse audience. To facilitate the organisation and scheduling of sessions, three distinct tracks have been established. If you are unsure which track your submission belongs or you feel that it applies to more than one track, submit your proposal and if accepted, the Programme Committee will find an appropriate fit.

Track 1: Research Data Management

  • New data types and their management
  • Challenges in exchanging research data across disciplines
  • Using social science data with data from other domains
  • Data linkage in the creation of new social science data
  • Data management within the global research data ecosystem
  • Data archives and repositories in the global data ecosystem
  • Best practices in the global data ecosystem
  • Metadata enabling the interoperability of research data
  • Application of DDI, SDMX, other metadata schema, taxonomies or ontologies in research data management
  • Data management policies and workflow systems
  • Data attribution and citation systems

Track 2: Professional Development

  • Training challenges given the growing number of professional positions within the global data ecosystem, which includes data curators, data scientists, data librarians, data archivists, etc.
  • Teaching end-users to work with research data
  • Data and statistical literacy
  • Data collection development in libraries and other institutions
  • Explorations of data across subject areas and geographic regions
  • Copyright clearance, privacy and confidential data
  • Working with ethics review boards and research service offices
  • Interdisciplinarity – promoting the cross-use of data
  • Training researchers about research data management planning
  • Liaison librarians’ roles in research data

Track 3: Data Developers and Tools

  • New infrastructure requirements in the global data ecosystem
  • Infrastructure supporting Data Without Borders
  • Tools to develop and support new social science data
  • Crowdsourcing applications in producing new social science data
  • Data dives or hackathons
  • API development supporting research data management
  • Open data web services
  • Applications of research data visualisation in the social sciences
  • Preservation tools for research data
  • Tools for data mining
  • Data technology platforms: cloud computing and open stack storage
Conference Formats

The Programme Committee welcomes submissions employing any of the following formats:

Individual proposal
This format consists of a 15 to 20 minute talk that is typically accompanied with a written paper. If your individual proposal is accepted, you will be grouped into an appropriate session with similarly themed presentations.
Session proposal
Session proposals consist of an identified set of presenters and their topics. Such proposals can suggest a variety of formats, e.g. a set of three to four presentations, a discussion panel, a discussion with the audience, etc. If accepted, the person who proposed the session becomes the session organiser and is responsible for securing speakers/participants and a chair/moderator (if not standing in that role him/herself).
Pecha Kucha proposal
A proposal for this programme event consists of a presentation of 20 slides shown for 20 seconds each, with heavy emphasis on visual content. Presentations in this event are timed and speakers are restricted to seven minutes.
Poster or demonstrations proposal
Proposals in this category should identify the message being conveyed in a poster or the nature of the demonstration being made.
Round table discussion proposal
Round table discussions typically take place during lunch and have limited seating. Please indicate how you plan to share the output of your round table discussion with all of IASSIST.

Session formats are not limited to the ideas above and session organisers are welcome to suggest other formats.

All submissions should include the proposed title and an abstract no longer than 200 words (note: longer abstracts will be returned to be shortened before being considered). Please note that all presenters are required to register and pay the registration fee for the conference. Registration for individual days will be available.

Please use this online submission form to submit your proposal. If you are unsure which track your submission fits or if you feel it belongs in more than one track, the Program Committee will find an appropriate place.

We also welcome workshop proposals around the same themes. Successful proposals will blend lecture and active learning techniques. The conference planning committee will provide the necessary classroom space and computing supplies for workshops. For previous examples of IASSIST workshops, please see the descriptions of 2011 workshops and 2013 workshops. Typically workshops are half-day with 2-hour and 3-hour options.

  • Deadline for submission: December 9, 2013 (2013.12.09)
  • Notification of acceptance: February 7, 2014 (2014.02.07).
Program Chairs
  • Johan Fihn
  • Jen Green
  • Chuck Humphrey

Scientific Data Repositories Issue Call for Change on Funding Models for Data Archives

For Immediate Release
September 16, 2013
Contact: Mark Thompson-Kolar, 734-615-7904
mdmtk@umich.edu

(Ann Arbor, MI) — Representatives of 25 organizations that archive scientific data today released a Call for Action urging the creation of sustainable funding streams for domain repositories — data archives with close ties to scientific communities.

The document was developed after a meeting of data repositories across the social and natural sciences June 24-25, 2013, in Ann Arbor. The meeting was organized by the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR) at the University of Michigan and supported by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation to discuss challenges facing domain repositories, particularly in light of the February 2013 memorandum from the U.S. Government’s Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) requiring public access to federally funded data.

Domain repositories in the natural and social sciences are built upon close relationships to the scientific communities that they service. By leveraging in-depth knowledge of the subject matter, domain repositories add value to the stored data beyond merely preserving the bits. As a result, repositories contribute to scientific discovery while ensuring that data curation methods keep pace as science evolves. “However, the systems currently in place for funding repositories in the US are inadequate for these tasks,” the document states.

The Call for Action argues that “Domain repositories must be funded as the essential piece of the US research infrastructure that they are,” emphasizing the importance of:

•    Ensuring funding streams that are long-term, uninterrupted and flexible
•    Creating systems that promote good scientific practice
•    Assuring equity in participation and access

The document expresses concerns regarding current and future funding models in consideration of the OSTP rules. “The push toward open access, while creating more equity of access for the community of users, creates more of a burden for domain repositories because it narrows their funding possibilities.”

“We are memory institutions,” ICPSR Director George Alter said. “One of our missions is to ensure data will be available for a long time, yet we’re being funded by short-term grants. There is a mismatch between our mission and the way we are funded. Widening access to data is a good thing. Everyone agrees on that. But it has to be done in a way that provides sustainable funding to the organizations that preserve and distribute the data.”

Repositories may require varied funding models, based on their scientific domain, the document states. “But in every case, creating sustainable funding streams will require the coordinated response of multiple stakeholders in the scientific, archival, academic, funding, and policy communities.”

The statement is endorsed by 30 domain repository representatives. It can be viewed on the ICPSR’s website at http://tinyurl.com/dataarchives.

The Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR), based in Ann Arbor, MI, is the largest archive of behavioral and social science research data in the world. It advances research by acquiring, curating, preserving, and distributing original research data. www.icpsr.umich.edu

The Alfred P. Sloan Foundation is a philanthropic, not-for-profit grantmaking institution based in New York. Established in 1934, the Foundation makes grants in support of original research and education in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and economic performance. www.sloan.org

Posted by request to the editor, in line with IASSIST members' interests.

IASSIST needs YOU to write a blog post about some aspect of the conference

Topic:

I could say this is needed because the videos and wifi weren't working, but in fact I'd be asking anyway.

Just think how helpful it is for members who could not be with us (and potential members) to get a snapshot of views about what happened. Serious, silly, short, verbose, objective, or ridiculously opinionated impressions of one session, the social events or overall are very welcome.

Turn your personal notes into a gift that keeps on giving.

If you have any trouble posting (as a member) simply contact iassistwebmaster@gmail.com and we'll sort you out.

Robin Rice

IASSIST Communications Chair & Website Editor

Newly elected IASSIST officials

Dear IASSISTers,

With a 59% voter turnout, the following people have been elected as our IASSIST Officers, whose terms begin at the end of the Annual Business Meeting of the Association, at lunchtime on Thursday 30 May 2013:

President: Bill Block

Vice President: Tuomas J. Alaterä

Treasurer: Thomas Lindsay

Secretary: Kristin Partlo

African Regional Secretary: Lynn Woolfrey

Asia-Pacific Regional Secretary: Sam Spencer

Canadian Regional Secretary: Michelle Edwards

European Regional Secretary: Tanvi Desai

US Regional Secretary: San Cannon

Admin committee member-at-large, Canada: Maxine Tedesco

Admin committee member-at-large, Europe: Laurence Horton

Admin committee members-at-large, USA: Amy Pienta, Lynda Kellam and Harrison Dekker

Congratulations to our newly elected officials, and I hope more people are encouraged to come forward and stand for positions in the next IASSIST election, which will be held in March 2015!

Melanie Wright

IASSIST Past President and Elections Chair

IASSISTers and librarians are doin' it for themselves

See video

 

Hey IASSISTers (gents, pardon for the video pun - couldnt' resist),

Are librarians at your institutions struggling to get up to speed with research data management (RDM)? If they're not, they probably should be. Library organisations are publishing reports and issuing recommendations left and right, such as the LIBER (Association of European Research Libraries) 2012 report, "Ten Recommendations for Libraries to Get Started with Research Data Management" (PDF). Just last week Nature published an article highlighting what the Great and the Good are doing in this area: Publishing Frontiers: The Library Reboot.

So the next question is, as a data professional, what are you doing to help the librarians at your institution get up to speed with RDM? Imagine (it isn't that hard for some of us) having gotten your Library masters degree sometime in the last century and now being told your job includes helping researchers manage their data? Librarians are sturdy souls, but that notion could be a bitter pill for someone who went into librarianship because of their love of books, right?

So you are a local expert who can help them. No doubt there will be plenty of opportunities for them to return the favour.

If you don't consider yourself a trainer, that's okay. Tell them about the Do-It-Yourself Research Data Management Training Kit for Librarians, from EDINA and Data Library, University of Edinburgh. They can train themselves in small groups, making use of reading assignments in MANTRA, reflective writing questions, group exercises from the UK Data Archive, and plenty of discussion time, to draw on their existing rich professional experience.

And then you can step in as a local expert to give one or more of the short talks to lead off the two hour training sessions in your choice of five RDM topics.Or if you're really keen, you can offer to be a facilitator for the training as a whole.Either way it's a great chance to build relationships across the institution, review your own knowledge, and raise your local visibility. If you're with me so far, read on for the promotional message about the training kit.

DIY Research Data Management Training Kit for Librarians

EDINA and Data Library, University of Edinburgh is pleased to announce the public release of the Do-It-Yourself Research Data Management Training Kit for Librarians, under a CC-BY licence:

http://datalib.edina.ac.uk/mantra/libtraining.html.

 The training kit is designed to contain everything needed for librarians in small groups to get themselves up to speed on five key topics in research data management - with or without expert speakers.

 The kit is a package of materials used by the Data Library in facilitating RDM training with a small group of librarians at the University of Edinburgh over the winter of 2012-13. The aim was to reuse the MANTRA course developed by the Data Library for early career researchers in a blended learning approach for academic liaison librarians.

 The training comprises five 2-hour face-to-face sessions. These open with short talks followed by group exercises from the UK Data Archive and long discussions, in a private collegiate setting. Emphasis is placed on facilitation and individual learning rather than long lectures and passive listening. MANTRA modules are used as reading assignments and reflective writing questions are designed to help librarians 'put themselves in the shoes of the researcher'. Learning is reinforced and put into practice through an independent study assignment of completing and publishing an interview with a researcher using the Data Curation Profile framework developed by D2C2 at Purdue University Libraries.

 The kit includes:

 * Promotional slides for the RDM Training Kit

* Training schedule

* Research Data MANTRA online course by EDINA and Data Library, University of Edinburgh: http://datalib.edina.ac.uk/mantra

* Reflective writing questions

* Selected group exercises (with answers) from UK Data Archive, University of Essex - /Managing and sharing data: Training resources./ September, 2011 (PDF). Complete RDM Resources Training Pack available: http://data-archive.ac.uk/create-manage/training-resources

* Podcasts (narrated presentations) for short talks by the original Edinburgh speakers (including from the DCC) if running course without ‘live’ speakers.

* Presentation files - if learners decide to take turns presenting each topic.

* Evaluation forms

* Independent study assignment: Data Curation Profile, from D2C2, Purdue University Libraries. Resources available: http://datacurationprofiles.org/

 As data librarians, we are aware of a great deal of curiosity and in some cases angst on the part of academic librarians regarding research data management. The training kit makes no assumptions about the role of librarians in supporting research data management, but aims to empower librarians to support each other in gaining confidence in this area of research support, whether or not they face the prospect of a new remit in their day to day job. It is aimed at practicing librarians who have much personal and professional experience to contribute to the learning experience of the group.

  • IASSIST Quarterly

    Publications Special issue: A pioneer data librarian
    Welcome to the special volume of the IASSIST Quarterly (IQ (37):1-4, 2013). This special issue started as exchange of ideas between Libbie Stephenson and Margaret Adams to collect

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