Already a member?

Sign In

March 2016

Latest Issue of IQ Available! Data Documentation Initiative - Results, Tools, and Further Initiatives

Welcome to the third issue of Volume 39 of the IASSIST Quarterly (IQ 39:3, 2015). This special issue is guest edited by Joachim Wackerow of GESIS – Leibniz Institute for the Social Sciences in Germany and Mary Vardigan of ICPSR at the University of Michigan, USA. That sentence is a direct plagiarism from the editor’s notes of the recent double issue (IQ 38:4 & 39:1). We are very grateful for all the work Mary and Achim have carried out and are developing further in the continuing story of the Data Documentation Initiative (DDI), and for their efforts in presenting the work here in the ASSIST Quarterly.

As in the recent double issue on DDI this special issue also presents results, tools, and further initiatives. The DDI started 20 years ago and much has been accomplished. However, creative people are still refining and improving it, as well as developing new areas for the use of DDI.

Mary Vardigan and Joachim Wackerow give on the next page an overview of the content of DDI papers in this issue.

Let me then applaud the two guest editors and also the many authors who made this possible:

  • Alerk Amin, RAND Cooperation, www.rand.org, USA
  • Ingo Barkow, Associate Professor for Data Management at the University for Applied Sciences Eastern Switzerland (HTW Chur), Switzerland
  • Stefan Kramer, American University, Washington, DC, USA
  • David Schiller, Research Data Centre (FDZ) of the German Federal Employment Agency (BA) at the Institute for Employment Research (IAB)
  • Jeremy Williams, Cornell Institute for Social and Economic Research, USA
  • Larry Hoyle, senior scientist at the Institute for Policy & Social Research at the University of Kansas, USA
  • Joachim Wackerow, metadata expert at GESIS - Leibniz Institute for the Social Sciences, Germany
  • William Poynter, UCL Institute of Education, London, UK
  • Jennifer Spiegel, UCL Institute of Education, London, UK
  • Jay Greenfield, health informatics architect working with data standards, USA
  • Sam Hume, vice president of SHARE Technology and Services at CDISC, USA
  • Sanda Ionescu, user support for data and documentation, ICPSR, USA
  • Jeremy Iverson, co-founder and partner at Colectica, USA
  • John Kunze, systems architect at the California Digital Library, USA
  • Barry Radler, researcher at the University of Wisconsin Institute on Aging, USA
  • Wendy Thomas, director of the Data Access Core in the Minnesota Population Center (MPC) at the University of Minnesota, USA
  • Mary Vardigan, archivist at the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR), USA
  • Stuart Weibel, worked in OCLC Research, USA
  • Michael Witt, associate professor of Library Science at Purdue University, USA.

I hope you will enjoy their work in this issue, and I am certain that the contact authors will enjoy hearing from you
about new potential results, tools, and initiatives.

Articles for the IASSIST Quarterly are always very welcome. They can be papers from IASSIST conferences or other
conferences and workshops, from local presentations or papers especially written for the IQ. When you are preparing
a presentation, give a thought to turning your one-time presentation into a lasting contribution to continuing development. As an author you are permitted ‘deep links’ where you link directly to your paper published in the IQ. Chairing a conference session with the purpose of aggregating and integrating papers for a special issue IQ is also much appreciated as the information reaches many more people than the session participants, and will be readily available on the IASSIST website at http://www.iassistdata.org.

Authors are very welcome to take a look at the instructions and layout: http://iassistdata.org/iq/instructions-authors. Authors can also contact me via e-mail: kbr@sam.sdu.dk.

Should you be interested in compiling a special issue for the IQ as guest editor(s) I will also be delighted to hear from you.

Karsten Boye Rasmussen
September 2015
Editor

New Perspectives on DDI

This issue features four papers that look at leveraging the structured metadata provided by DDI in
different ways. The first, “Design Considerations for DDI-Based Data Systems,“ aims to help decisionmakers
by highlighting the approach of using relational databases for data storage in contrast to
representing DDI in its native XML format. The second paper, “DDI as a Common Format for Export
and Import for Statistical Packages,” describes an experiment using the program Stat/Transfer to
move datasets among five popular packages with DDI Lifecycle as an intermediary format. The paper
“Protocol Development for Large-Scale Metadata Archiving Using DDI Lifecycle” discusses the use
of a DDI profile to document CLOSER (Cohorts and Longitudinal Studies Enhancement Resources,
www.closer.ac.uk), which brings together nine of the UK’s longitudinal cohort studies by producing a
metadata discovery platform (MDP). And finally, “DDI and Enhanced Data Citation“ reports on efforts in
extend data citation information in DDI to include a larger set of elements and a taxonomy for the role
of research contributors.

Mary Vardigan - vardigan@umich.edu
Joachim Wackerow - Joachim.Wackerow@gesis.org

Digital Scholarship Librarian Opening at Kansas City Fed

Topic:

Please see the announcement below for a new position created here in the Center for the Advancement of Data and Research in Economics at the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City .  It will be part of the content support team that works with our technology specialists to support, enhance and advance data or computationally intensive research in economics.   This position reports to me and has supervisory responsibility for our library staff.  Please let me know if I can answer any questions.

San Cannon

sandra.cannon@kc.frb.org

To apply:  https://frb.taleo.net/careersection/jobdetail.ftl?job=244803

Digital scholarship Librarian

This new position will manage a team of three library staff as part of the Center for the Advancement for Data and Research in Economics (CADRE). In addition to continuing to provide reference services, strategic collection development, and other information services, this team will spearhead new research support initiatives such as curation of research data, promotion of Bank research and analytical output, and educating the research staff on issues related to intellectual property and emerging measures and metrics for assessing the scholarly impact of publications and other forms of scholarly expression. Specific responsibilities for the position include:

  • Develop and implement data management, data curation, and data publication and access initiatives, working closely with the technology staff, researchers, and others. 
  • Lead the library and the Bank in developing a vision for policies, strategies, programs, and staffing that supports and advances scholarly expression by researchers across the variety of business lines engaged in such work. Work with Board and System library and research staff to fully account for potential partnerships and shared services, leveraging existing relationships and collaborations where available and appropriate and suggesting new connections or associations where necessary.
  • Work closely with Legal, Public Affairs, Information Security, and others to develop mechanisms that can enable the dissemination of research products such as computer code and data and help address specific questions regarding intellectual property and licensing, as well as related questions with confident and reliable answers.
  • Actively and purposefully manage current library staff to ensure full engagement and appropriate application of talents and resources while making measurable strides towards the strategic vision of operating as a vital and vibrant organization focused on connecting users with information and data to support activities along the entire span of the research lifecycle .

The successful candidate is expected to be active professionally and to contribute to developments in the field.

Qualifications

Required: ALA-accredited graduate degree or accredited graduate degree in an appropriate discipline. At least 5 years of professional experience with at least 3 years of a progressively growing portfolio in leadership and administration of research libraries.

Preferred: Demonstrated and broad knowledge and expertise regarding scholarly communications and scholarly publishing issues. Deep understanding of scholarly and research enterprise at research universities or other research oriented institutions. Comprehensive knowledge and understanding of the evolving digital context for scholarship, research, teaching, and creative expression. Wide-ranging knowledge and understanding of scholarly publishing initiatives in research libraries, including technology platforms for publishing, staffing options, and business models. Experience with new information technologies. Strong interpersonal, collaboration, and teambuilding skills. Impeccable presentation, written, and oral communication skills.

 To apply: https://frb.taleo.net/careersection/jobdetail.ftl?job=244803

International Digital Curation Conference 2016 (IDCC16)

The International Digital Curation Conference 2016 was in Amsterdam between 23-24 February.

IASSIST was again a sponsor, and presented a poster on IASSIST members’ activities. In addition, plenty of familiar faces were present including our current IASSIST president and three former ones.

This year’s conference was the eleventh IDCC and took the title of "Visible data, invisible infrastructure". This asks what can we do to make the hard work of preserving data and making it and keeping it usable as easy as possible for researchers to use and as unobtrusive as possible in their work.

One feature of this year’s conference was the importance of terminology. In his opening keynote, Barend Mons made a good point that accessible data is not open data and sharing data does not make it reusable. Reusable is what is important. In his plenary, Andrew Sallans spoke of openness and sharing as core to scientific activity. His presentation was insightful on how data is lost (paywalls, broken links, TIF walls), as was his call for five percent of research budgets be reserved for data stewardship and the need for Europe to train 500,000 data experts in the next decade. The final keynote from Susan Halford was a warning about sloppy research methodology as researchers gorge on new big data sources. Using social media as an example, she cautioned on how these are not “naturally occurring” data but mediated by private companies using methods we do not know about.

The rest of the conference split into concurrent sessions with either a national or institutional focus, or featuring demonstrations and elaborations on tools and services. It is interesting to see how ventures like Dataverse and DMPonline/Tool fit into national infrastructure initiatives like Australian National Data Service or Canada’s Portage and institutional ones like those demonstrated by the universities of Oxford and California. If they are to do so successfully, it will be with a vison of enabling researchers to do better science rather than compelling researchers to comply with bureaucracy, and that the route to achieving this will be through open standards and building on existing initiatives rather than going back to constructing new tools to do essentially the same job.

An impressive feature of IDCC is the methodological rigour applied to research papers. An example to highlight from the programme was Renata Curty’s research on Factors influencing research data reuse in social sciences.

The final notable aspect of IDCC16 was how almost none of the suggestions in keynotes and tools presented supported “traditional” academic publishing. Reuse needs discoverable, machine readable, contextualised data with minimal barriers to access and minimal limits on usage – not the business model on which some well-known academic publishers thrive.

All presentations, posters, demonstrations, as well as blogs reporting on IDCC16 can be found on the DCC website.

  • IASSIST Quarterly

    Publications Special issue: A pioneer data librarian
    Welcome to the special volume of the IASSIST Quarterly (IQ (37):1-4, 2013). This special issue started as exchange of ideas between Libbie Stephenson and Margaret Adams to collect

    more...

  • Resources

    Resources

    A space for IASSIST members to share professional resources useful to them in their daily work. Also the IASSIST Jobs Repository for an archive of data-related position descriptions. more...

  • community

    • LinkedIn
    • Facebook
    • Twitter

    Find out what IASSISTers are doing in the field and explore other avenues of presentation, communication and discussion via social networking and related online social spaces. more...