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IASSIST 2016 Conference Papers Announcement

Topic:

Hello IASSISTers,

Thank you for the outstanding participation in this year's Conference Paper Competition! We received a lot of quality submissions that will be presented next week at IASSIST 2016 in Bergen, Norway. 

In advance of the conference, and on behalf of the Program Committee, I'd like to announce the winners and runner-ups for the 2016 Conference Paper Award:

Congratulations to Sophia Lafferty Hess and Thu-Mai Christian from ODUM for their paper titled "More Data, Less Process: The Applicability of MPLP to Research Data"!

And, the first runner-up: “Image Data Management as a Data Service” by Berenica Vejvoda, K. Jane Burpee and Paula Lackie

Second runner-up: “Mitigating Survey Fraud and Human Error: Lessons Learned From A Low Budget Village Census in Bangladesh” by Muhammad F. Bhuiyan and Paula Lackie

Many thanks to Berenica Vejvoda, Coordinator, and the team of evaluators:

Jennifer Green

Wendy Mann

Kathleen Fear

James Ng

Inna Kouper

Laine Ruus

Matthew Gertler

Ron Nakao

Tom Lindsay

Berenica will be giving a presentation about the papers at the business lunch (see Conference Program), so if you are attending, more information will be provided there.

All of the papers will be eligible for publication in the IASSIST Quarterly. For more information about publishing in the IQ, please contact Karsten Rasmussen


See you in Bergen!

Best, 

Amber & Florio

IASSIST 2016 Program At-A-Glance, Part 2: Data infrastructure, data processing and research data management

 

Here's another list of highlights from IASSIST2016 which is focusing on the data revolution. For previous highlights, see here.

Infrastructure

  • For those of you with an interest in technical infrastructure, the University of Applied Sciences HTW Chur will showcase an early protype MMRepo (1 June, 3F), whose function is to store qualitative and quantitative data into one big data repository.
  • The UK Data Service will present the following panel "The CESSDA Technical Framework - what is it and why is it needed?", which elaborates how the CESSDA Research Infrastructure should have modern data curation techniques rooted in sophisticated IT capabilities at its core, in order to better serve its community.

  • If you have been wondering about the various operational components and the associated technology counterparts involved with running a data science repository, then the presentation by ICPSR is for you. Participants in that panel will leave with an understanding of how the Archonnex Architecture at ICPSR is strengthening the data services offered to new researchers and much more.

Data processing

Be sure to check out the aforementioned infrastructure offerings if you’re interested in data processing, but also check out a half-day workshop on 31 May, “Text Processing with Regular Expressions,” presented by Harrison Dekker, UC Berkeley, that will help you learn regular expression syntax and how to use it in R, Python, and on the command line. The workshop will be example-driven.

Data visualisation

If you are comfortable working with quantitative data and are familiar with the R tool for statistical computing and want to learn how to create a variety of visualisations, then the workshop by the University of Minnesota on 31 May is for you. It will introduce the logic behind ggplot2 and give participants hands-on experience creating data visualizations with this package. This session will also introduce participants to related tools for creating interactive graphics from this syntax.

Programming

  • If you’re interesting in programming there’s a full-day Intro to Python for Data Wrangling workshop on 31 May, led by Tim Dennis, UC San Diego,  that will provide tools to use scientific notebooks in the cloud, write basic Python programs, integrate disparate csv files and more.

  • Also, the aforementioned Regular Expressions workshop also on 31 May will offer  in-workshop opportunities  to working with real data and perform representative data cleaning and validation operations in multiple languages.

Research data management

  • Get a behind-the-scenes look at data management and see how an organization such as the Odum Institute manages its archiving workflows, head to “Automating Archive Policy Enforcement using Dataverse and iRODS” on 31 May with presenters from the UNC Odom Institute, UNC Chapel Hill. ’Participants will see machine actionable rules in practice and be introduced to an environment where written policies can be expressed in ways an archive can automate their enforcement.

  • Another good half-day workshop, targeted to for people tasked with teaching good research data management practices to researchers is  “Teaching Research Data Management Skills Using Resources and Scenarios Based on Real Data,” 31 May, with presenters from ICPSR, the UK Data Archive and FORS. The organisers of this workshop will showcase recent examples of how they have developed teaching resources for hands-on-training, and will talk about successes and failures in this regard.

Tools

If you’re just looking to add more resources to your data revolution toolbox, whether it’s metadata, teaching, data management, open and restricted access, or documentation, here’s a quick list of highlights:

  • At Creating GeoBlacklight Metadata: Leveraging Open Source Tools to Facilitate Metadata Genesis (31 May), presenters from New York University will provide hands-on experience in creating GeoBlacklight geospatial metadata, including demos on how to capture, export, and store GeoBlacklight metadata.

  • DDI Tools Demo (1 June). The Data Documentation Initiative (DDI) is an international standard for describing statistical and social science data.

  • DDI tools: No Tools, No Standard (3 June), where participants will be introduced to the work of the DDI Developers Community and get an overview of tools available from the community.

Open-access

As mandates for better accessibility of data affects more researchers, dive into the Conversation with these IASSIST offerings:

Metadata

Don’s miss IASSIST 2016’s offerings on metadata, which is the data about the data that makes finding and working with data easier to do. There are many offerings, with a quick list of highlights below:

  • Creating GeoBlacklight Metadata: Leveraging Open Source Tools to Facilitate Metadata Genesis (Half-day workshop, 31 May), with presenters from New York University

  • At Posters and Snacks on 2 June, Building A Metadata Portfolio For Cessda, with presenters from the Finnish Social Science Data Archive; GESIS – Leibniz-Institute for the Social Sciences; and UK Data Service

Spread the word on Twitter using #IASSIST16. 


A story by Dory Knight-Ingram (
ICPSR)

New to IASSIST or Willing to Mentor Someone New?

Topic:

 

New to IASSIST or Willing to Mentor Someone New?

We are excited to have new members in IASSIST. IASSIST is a home for data services professionals across many disciplines: librarians, data archivists, open data proponents, data support staff, etc. For some, it is an organization where you don’t have to explain what you do because our members already understand. We get metadata, data support, data access issues, database challenges, the challenge of replication and so much more! Although we are a long-established organization, new members are the lifeblood of IASSIST!
  Networking is a great benefit of attending the IASSIST conference but the week quickly goes by and and it can be daunting to join a lively group like this. To get the most out of your membership, we encourage everyone to join the IASSIST mentorship program. Please answer the following questions so we can match mentors and mentees. We will try to match you with someone who has similar interests and experiences. If you know of anyone who will be participating that you would like to be matched with, please indicate below. Please sign up by Friday, May 13. Conference contact assignments for IASSIST will be emailed by the end of the day Tuesday, May 17.You can register in Google Forms 
https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1l1M58RqsGiamN2z1wPQwzCyqwdU9Z3ETMbnJoZzpPvY/viewform?c=0&w=1

If you have any questions, please contact Bobray Bordelon (bordelon@princeton.edu). Thank you for participating & see you in Bergen!

Interested in the “data revolution” and what it means for research? Here’s why you should attend IASSIST2016

 

Part 1: Data sharing, new data sources and data protection

IASSIST is an international organisation of information technology and data services professionals which aims to provide support to research and teaching in the social sciences. It has over 300 members ranging from data archive staff and librarians to statistical agencies, government departments and non-profit organisations.

The theme of this year’s conference is Embracing the ‘data revolution’: opportunities and challenges for research” and it is the 42nd of its kind, taking place every year. IASSIST2016 will take place in Bergen, Norway, from 31 May to 3 June, hosted by NSD - Norwegian Centre for Research Data.

Here is a first snapshot of what is there and why it is important.

Data sharing

If you have ever wondered whether data sharing is to the advantage of researchers, there will be a session led by Utrecht University Library exploring the matter. The first results of a survey which explores personal beliefs, intention and behaviour regarding the sharing of data will also be presented by GESIS. The relationship between data sharing and data citation, relatively overlooked until now, will then be addressed by the Australian Data Archive.

If you are interested in how a data journal could incentivise replications in economics, you should think about attending a session by ZBW Leibniz Information Centre for Economics which will present some studies describing the outcome of replication attempts and discuss the meaning of failed replications in economics.

GESIS will then look into improving research data sharing by addressing different scholarly target groups such as individual researchers, academic institutions, or scientific journals, all of which place diverse demands on a data sharing tool. They will focus on the tools offered by GESIS as well as a joint tool, “SowiDataNet”, offered together with the Social Science Centre Berlin, the German Institute for Economic Research, and the German National Library of Economic.

The UKDA and UKDS will present a paper which seeks to explore the role that case studies of research can play in regard to effective data sharing, reuse and impact.

The Data Archive in Finland (FSD) will also be presented as a case study of an archive that is broadening its services to the health sciences and humanities, disciplines in which data sharing practices have not yet been established.

If you’d like to know more about data accessibility, which is being required by journals and mandated by government funders, join a diverse group of open data experts as IASSIST dives into open data dialogue that includes presentations on Open Data and Citizen Empowerment and 101 Cool Things to do with Open Data as part of the “Opening up on open data workshop.” Presenters will be from archives from across the globe.

New data sources

A talk entitled “Data science: The future of social science?” by UKDA will introduce its conceptual and technical work in developing a big data platform for social science and outline preliminary findings from work using energy data.

If you have been wondering about the role of social media data in the academic environment, the session by the University of California will include an overview of the social media data landscape and the Crimson Hexagon product.

The three Vs of big data, volume, variety and velocity, are being explored in the “Hybrid Data Lake” being built by UKDA using the Universal Decimal Classification platform and expanding “topics” search while using big data management. Find out more about it as well as possible future applications.

Data protection

If you follow data protection issues, the panel on “Data protection: legal and ethical reviews” is for you, starting off with a presentation of the Administrative Data Research Network's (ADRN) Citizen's Panel, which look at public concerns about research using administrative data, the content of which is both personal and confidential. The ADRN was set up as part of the UK Government’s Big Data initiative as a UK-wide partnership between universities, government bodies, national statistics authorities and the wider research community.

The next ADRN presentation within this session will outline their application process and the role of the Approvals Panel in relation to ethical review. The aim is “to expand the discussion towards a broader reflection on the ethical dilemmas that administrative data pose”, as well as present some steps taken to address these difficulties.

NSD will then present the new EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), recently adopted at EU level, and explain how it will affect data collection, data use, data preservation and data sharing. If you have been wondering how the regulation will influence the possibilities for processing personal data for research purposes, or how personal data are defined, what conditions apply to an informed consent, or in which cases it is legal and ethical to conduct research without the consent of the data subjects, this presentation is for you.

The big picture

Wednesday 1 June will kick-off with a plenary entitled “Data for decision-makers: Old practice - new challenges” by Gudmund Hernes, the current president of the International Social Science Council and Norway’s former Minister of Education and Research 1990-95, and Minister of Health 1995-97.

The third day of the conference (2 June) will begin with a plenary - “Embracing the ‘Data Revolution’: Opportunities and Challenges for Research’ or ‘What you need to know about the data landscape to keep up to date”, by Matthew Woollard, Director of the UK Data Archive at the University of Essex and Director of the UK Data Service.

If you want to know more about the three European projects under the framework of the Horizon 2020 programme of the European Commission that CESSDA is involved in, one on big data (Big Data Europe - Empowering Communities with Data Technologies), another on - strengthening and widening the European infrastructure for social science data archives (CESSDA SaW) and a third on synergies for Europe's Research Infrastructures in the Social Sciences (SERISS), this panel is for you.  

"Don't Hate the Player, Hate the Game": Strategies for Discussing and Communicating Data Services” considers how libraries might strategically reconsider communications about data services.

Keep an eye on this blog for more news in the run-up to IASSIST2016.

Find out more on the IASSIST2016 website.

Spread the word on Twitter using #IASSIST16.

We are looking forward to seeing you in Bergen! 


A story by Eleanor Smith (CESSDA)

IASSIST will be at RDAP!

For those of you attending the RDAP Summit next week in Atlanta, GA, USA, be sure to keep an eye out for IASSIST. We are a sponsoring organization—check out the advance thank you blog post from RDAP.

Our VP, Jen Green, will be on the scene with promoting IASSIST at the poster session. Be sure to stop by to say "hi" and pick up your very own IASSIST logo button. 

Looking forward to hearing the report back from RDAP!

2016 IASSIST Fellowships

The IASSIST Fellows Committee are pleased to announce that we will be awarding an IASSIST Fellowship award for the 2016 conference to the following recipients:

Marijana Glavica - Systems Librarian, University of Zagreb, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, Croatia

'As a systems librarian I work with bibliographic data and manage library automation systems. I am also involved in designing library policies and procedures. As a subject specialist I provide information services to psychology professors and students, and I teach a course about information resources in psychology. In the last few years I started to work towards establishment of data archive and services for the social sciences in Croatia, an effort supported by SERSCIDA project in the past and currently by two ongoing projects - SEEDS and CESSDA-SaW.'

Dr Bhojaraju Gunjal - Head of Central Library, National Institute of Technology Rourkela, India

'I am serving as Head, Central Library (Deputy Librarian) of our institute library since August, 2014. In this capacity, I am responsible for management of the Biju Patnaik Central Library of this institute which employs 33 people including library staff, trainees, support staff and has an annual budget of over Rs. 6 Crores.

Our library manages institutional repositories using the DSpace and e-Prints tools with a number of new initiatives  under progress such as integrating ORCID with all our repositories, research data management, etc.  In this regard, programs like IASSIST will definitely help in managing our data repositories in much more effective way.

The library also provides special services by implementing state-of-the-art technologies in various initiatives such as Research data management, Liaison Program, Migration of library software to Open Source tools, Integration of Bio-metric with RFID, Mobile Apps including SMS/email alerts, QR Code, Knowledge Management aspects, Discovery Services, etc. for our library.

I will use this acquired knowledge through the Fellows program for the development of our library data repositories in developing, supporting and managing data infrastructures for our users and help other fellow colleagues in implementing the same in other libraries of India.'

Shima Moradisomehsaraei - Lecturer, Tehran Medical University & Azad University, Iran

'I teach information science and Information technology related courses to library , Medical Information system and Medical bioinformatic students. This means I teach students on how to use softwares to manage,correct and analysis data and how to design models and graphs. Teaching on the "indexing and retrieving" course we work on big data and linked data issues. I also teach on another related course "medical information systems" which I discusses big data and how it influences medical data of the whole society.'

Ya-Chi Lin, Data Specialist, Survey Research Data Archive, Academia Sinica, Taiwan

'Our institution, Survey Research Data Archive (SRDA) is an electronic library of the largest collection of digital data in social sciences in Taiwan. Part of my work entails is to promote SRDA and help SRDA members to use data to conduct secondary data analysis. I go to the campus and launch webinars to introduce the academic survey data and government survey data, and the enquiry service of SRDA to potential users.'

We would like to welcome our fellows into the IASSIST community and we're sure that they'll be made to feel at home by all IASSIST members at our forthcoming conference in Bergen, Norway.

Stuart Macdonald & Florio Arguillas (Chairs of IASSIST Fellows Committee)

Latest Issue of IQ Available! Data Documentation Initiative - Results, Tools, and Further Initiatives

Welcome to the third issue of Volume 39 of the IASSIST Quarterly (IQ 39:3, 2015). This special issue is guest edited by Joachim Wackerow of GESIS – Leibniz Institute for the Social Sciences in Germany and Mary Vardigan of ICPSR at the University of Michigan, USA. That sentence is a direct plagiarism from the editor’s notes of the recent double issue (IQ 38:4 & 39:1). We are very grateful for all the work Mary and Achim have carried out and are developing further in the continuing story of the Data Documentation Initiative (DDI), and for their efforts in presenting the work here in the ASSIST Quarterly.

As in the recent double issue on DDI this special issue also presents results, tools, and further initiatives. The DDI started 20 years ago and much has been accomplished. However, creative people are still refining and improving it, as well as developing new areas for the use of DDI.

Mary Vardigan and Joachim Wackerow give on the next page an overview of the content of DDI papers in this issue.

Let me then applaud the two guest editors and also the many authors who made this possible:

  • Alerk Amin, RAND Cooperation, www.rand.org, USA
  • Ingo Barkow, Associate Professor for Data Management at the University for Applied Sciences Eastern Switzerland (HTW Chur), Switzerland
  • Stefan Kramer, American University, Washington, DC, USA
  • David Schiller, Research Data Centre (FDZ) of the German Federal Employment Agency (BA) at the Institute for Employment Research (IAB)
  • Jeremy Williams, Cornell Institute for Social and Economic Research, USA
  • Larry Hoyle, senior scientist at the Institute for Policy & Social Research at the University of Kansas, USA
  • Joachim Wackerow, metadata expert at GESIS - Leibniz Institute for the Social Sciences, Germany
  • William Poynter, UCL Institute of Education, London, UK
  • Jennifer Spiegel, UCL Institute of Education, London, UK
  • Jay Greenfield, health informatics architect working with data standards, USA
  • Sam Hume, vice president of SHARE Technology and Services at CDISC, USA
  • Sanda Ionescu, user support for data and documentation, ICPSR, USA
  • Jeremy Iverson, co-founder and partner at Colectica, USA
  • John Kunze, systems architect at the California Digital Library, USA
  • Barry Radler, researcher at the University of Wisconsin Institute on Aging, USA
  • Wendy Thomas, director of the Data Access Core in the Minnesota Population Center (MPC) at the University of Minnesota, USA
  • Mary Vardigan, archivist at the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR), USA
  • Stuart Weibel, worked in OCLC Research, USA
  • Michael Witt, associate professor of Library Science at Purdue University, USA.

I hope you will enjoy their work in this issue, and I am certain that the contact authors will enjoy hearing from you
about new potential results, tools, and initiatives.

Articles for the IASSIST Quarterly are always very welcome. They can be papers from IASSIST conferences or other
conferences and workshops, from local presentations or papers especially written for the IQ. When you are preparing
a presentation, give a thought to turning your one-time presentation into a lasting contribution to continuing development. As an author you are permitted ‘deep links’ where you link directly to your paper published in the IQ. Chairing a conference session with the purpose of aggregating and integrating papers for a special issue IQ is also much appreciated as the information reaches many more people than the session participants, and will be readily available on the IASSIST website at http://www.iassistdata.org.

Authors are very welcome to take a look at the instructions and layout: http://iassistdata.org/iq/instructions-authors. Authors can also contact me via e-mail: kbr@sam.sdu.dk.

Should you be interested in compiling a special issue for the IQ as guest editor(s) I will also be delighted to hear from you.

Karsten Boye Rasmussen
September 2015
Editor

New Perspectives on DDI

This issue features four papers that look at leveraging the structured metadata provided by DDI in
different ways. The first, “Design Considerations for DDI-Based Data Systems,“ aims to help decisionmakers
by highlighting the approach of using relational databases for data storage in contrast to
representing DDI in its native XML format. The second paper, “DDI as a Common Format for Export
and Import for Statistical Packages,” describes an experiment using the program Stat/Transfer to
move datasets among five popular packages with DDI Lifecycle as an intermediary format. The paper
“Protocol Development for Large-Scale Metadata Archiving Using DDI Lifecycle” discusses the use
of a DDI profile to document CLOSER (Cohorts and Longitudinal Studies Enhancement Resources,
www.closer.ac.uk), which brings together nine of the UK’s longitudinal cohort studies by producing a
metadata discovery platform (MDP). And finally, “DDI and Enhanced Data Citation“ reports on efforts in
extend data citation information in DDI to include a larger set of elements and a taxonomy for the role
of research contributors.

Mary Vardigan - vardigan@umich.edu
Joachim Wackerow - Joachim.Wackerow@gesis.org

Digital Scholarship Librarian Opening at Kansas City Fed

Topic:

Please see the announcement below for a new position created here in the Center for the Advancement of Data and Research in Economics at the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City .  It will be part of the content support team that works with our technology specialists to support, enhance and advance data or computationally intensive research in economics.   This position reports to me and has supervisory responsibility for our library staff.  Please let me know if I can answer any questions.

San Cannon

sandra.cannon@kc.frb.org

To apply:  https://frb.taleo.net/careersection/jobdetail.ftl?job=244803

Digital scholarship Librarian

This new position will manage a team of three library staff as part of the Center for the Advancement for Data and Research in Economics (CADRE). In addition to continuing to provide reference services, strategic collection development, and other information services, this team will spearhead new research support initiatives such as curation of research data, promotion of Bank research and analytical output, and educating the research staff on issues related to intellectual property and emerging measures and metrics for assessing the scholarly impact of publications and other forms of scholarly expression. Specific responsibilities for the position include:

  • Develop and implement data management, data curation, and data publication and access initiatives, working closely with the technology staff, researchers, and others. 
  • Lead the library and the Bank in developing a vision for policies, strategies, programs, and staffing that supports and advances scholarly expression by researchers across the variety of business lines engaged in such work. Work with Board and System library and research staff to fully account for potential partnerships and shared services, leveraging existing relationships and collaborations where available and appropriate and suggesting new connections or associations where necessary.
  • Work closely with Legal, Public Affairs, Information Security, and others to develop mechanisms that can enable the dissemination of research products such as computer code and data and help address specific questions regarding intellectual property and licensing, as well as related questions with confident and reliable answers.
  • Actively and purposefully manage current library staff to ensure full engagement and appropriate application of talents and resources while making measurable strides towards the strategic vision of operating as a vital and vibrant organization focused on connecting users with information and data to support activities along the entire span of the research lifecycle .

The successful candidate is expected to be active professionally and to contribute to developments in the field.

Qualifications

Required: ALA-accredited graduate degree or accredited graduate degree in an appropriate discipline. At least 5 years of professional experience with at least 3 years of a progressively growing portfolio in leadership and administration of research libraries.

Preferred: Demonstrated and broad knowledge and expertise regarding scholarly communications and scholarly publishing issues. Deep understanding of scholarly and research enterprise at research universities or other research oriented institutions. Comprehensive knowledge and understanding of the evolving digital context for scholarship, research, teaching, and creative expression. Wide-ranging knowledge and understanding of scholarly publishing initiatives in research libraries, including technology platforms for publishing, staffing options, and business models. Experience with new information technologies. Strong interpersonal, collaboration, and teambuilding skills. Impeccable presentation, written, and oral communication skills.

 To apply: https://frb.taleo.net/careersection/jobdetail.ftl?job=244803

International Digital Curation Conference 2016 (IDCC16)

The International Digital Curation Conference 2016 was in Amsterdam between 23-24 February.

IASSIST was again a sponsor, and presented a poster on IASSIST members’ activities. In addition, plenty of familiar faces were present including our current IASSIST president and three former ones.

This year’s conference was the eleventh IDCC and took the title of "Visible data, invisible infrastructure". This asks what can we do to make the hard work of preserving data and making it and keeping it usable as easy as possible for researchers to use and as unobtrusive as possible in their work.

One feature of this year’s conference was the importance of terminology. In his opening keynote, Barend Mons made a good point that accessible data is not open data and sharing data does not make it reusable. Reusable is what is important. In his plenary, Andrew Sallans spoke of openness and sharing as core to scientific activity. His presentation was insightful on how data is lost (paywalls, broken links, TIF walls), as was his call for five percent of research budgets be reserved for data stewardship and the need for Europe to train 500,000 data experts in the next decade. The final keynote from Susan Halford was a warning about sloppy research methodology as researchers gorge on new big data sources. Using social media as an example, she cautioned on how these are not “naturally occurring” data but mediated by private companies using methods we do not know about.

The rest of the conference split into concurrent sessions with either a national or institutional focus, or featuring demonstrations and elaborations on tools and services. It is interesting to see how ventures like Dataverse and DMPonline/Tool fit into national infrastructure initiatives like Australian National Data Service or Canada’s Portage and institutional ones like those demonstrated by the universities of Oxford and California. If they are to do so successfully, it will be with a vison of enabling researchers to do better science rather than compelling researchers to comply with bureaucracy, and that the route to achieving this will be through open standards and building on existing initiatives rather than going back to constructing new tools to do essentially the same job.

An impressive feature of IDCC is the methodological rigour applied to research papers. An example to highlight from the programme was Renata Curty’s research on Factors influencing research data reuse in social sciences.

The final notable aspect of IDCC16 was how almost none of the suggestions in keynotes and tools presented supported “traditional” academic publishing. Reuse needs discoverable, machine readable, contextualised data with minimal barriers to access and minimal limits on usage – not the business model on which some well-known academic publishers thrive.

All presentations, posters, demonstrations, as well as blogs reporting on IDCC16 can be found on the DCC website.

Share Your Story: Case Studies of Data Reuse

Late last year, a colleague at Innovations for Poverty Action, Stephanie Wykstra, and I started having conversations about reuse of open data and what we do and don’t know about the re-use of existing data sets, particularly which data sets and how they are used.  We are also interested in the specific challenges researchers face as they try to re-use data sets collected for other research purposes.  Stephanie and I would like to start filling this gap so we are putting out a call for case studies.

If you have re-used data for your own research (or know someone else who has), we would love to hear about it! The parameters and further details for the call can be found in this blog post on the Mozilla Science Lab blog: https://www.mozillascience.org/share-your-story.

We are particularly interested in stories of data re-use that are not from large-scale surveys or census data sets as there are many examples of those.  We are also aware of some instances where large data repositories collect information on use of data sets housed in their collections (see ICPSR Bibliography of Data-related Literature and UK Data Archive).  While we will be incorporating some of those cases in our report, we’d like to hear more about stories that may not be included in those collections.

There is a very simple form at the blog post linked above.  We are basically interested in:

1) What made the data that you re-used valuable for your own research?

2) What made the data easy or challenging to re-use?

and

3) Your advice to researchers who are sharing their data for re-use.  

The deadline for submitting case studies is March 10, 2016.  We will make all responses publicly available in a report after an analysis of the responses (with your permission). Depending on funding, we may be able to sponsor researchers who provide case studies to a workshop on data re-use.  Please spread this call far and wide to any you think would be interested in participating.  

If you have questions, feel free to tweet or email either Stephanie Wykstra (@Swykstr) or myself, Stephanie Wright (@shefw).  We appreciate any support you can provide!

  • IASSIST Quarterly

    Publications Special issue: A pioneer data librarian
    Welcome to the special volume of the IASSIST Quarterly (IQ (37):1-4, 2013). This special issue started as exchange of ideas between Libbie Stephenson and Margaret Adams to collect

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    Resources

    A space for IASSIST members to share professional resources useful to them in their daily work. Also the IASSIST Jobs Repository for an archive of data-related position descriptions. more...

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    Find out what IASSISTers are doing in the field and explore other avenues of presentation, communication and discussion via social networking and related online social spaces. more...